A Hundred Miles or More: A Collection

April 3, 2007 | Format: MP3

$0.00
Also available in CD Format
Song Title Artist
Time
Popularity  


Product Details

  • Original Release Date: April 3, 2007
  • Label: Rounder
  • Total Length: 1:07:28
  • Genres:
  • ASIN: B000UDTKB2
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (256 customer reviews)

Customer Reviews

Great voice, great songs!
Jim Altfeld
The song lyrics were beautiful; and Alison Krauss's voice was angelic.
Virginia Ceresa
Alison Krauss has an angelic voice.
Michael Wheeler

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

152 of 163 people found the following review helpful By Alan Dorfman VINE VOICE on April 3, 2007
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
As far as I'm concerned Alison Krauss sings like an angel, fiddles like the devil and can do no wrong. If you don't agree you might as well stop reading now.

This is a collection of gems that Alison has provided to others as duet partners, for tribute albums and for movies plus 5 new or unreleased tracks. It includes Best Song Oscar Nominees "The Scarlet Tide" and "You Will Be My Ain True Love" both from Cold Mountain, the Grammy nominated duet with James Taylor "How's The World Treating You" from a Louvin Brothers tribute CD and the multiple 2004 CMA Award Winner (Best Song, Best Vocal Event and Best Video), her duet with Brad Paisely on the perfect "Whiskey Lullabye." Speaking of lullabies, there's also "Baby Mine" from a collection of Disney songs.

If that's not enough to satisfy you, there's more movie music her - the immensely touching "I Give You To His Heart" from The Prince Of Egypt and the sheer brilliance of the a capella "Down To The River To Pray" from O Brother! Where Art Thou. Other collaborators include the Chieftains and John Waite with whom she remakes his hit "Missing You" and reveals a more forceful, earthy power to her usually ethereal voice and they also duet on Don Williams' "Lay Down Beside Me" which is one of the previously unreleased songs on the CD.

But it is the other 4 we've not heard before that start off the CD and are the true treasures here. "You're Just A Country Boy" warns a guy about the dangers of going after a higher class woman, "Simple Love" describes exactly that and the singer's desire for one, "Jacob's Dream" is the stunning narrative of two little boys who go missing and the heartbreaking "Away Down The River" in which a dying woman comforts the one she leaves behind.
Read more ›
9 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
72 of 78 people found the following review helpful By William Merrill TOP 1000 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on April 3, 2007
Format: Audio CD
Alison Krauss' sweet singing style is something I love to listen to, really even more than her bluegrass work. As such, this is mostly a welcome collection, especially as it gathers together songs from a variety of sources such as soundtracks and tribute albums. I had heard many of them before, but a few were new to me, such as "The Scarlet Tide" from the Cold Mountain soundtrack (a real gem). There are many duets, some of which - with James Taylor on "How's The World Treating You" - work better than others (Brad Paisley). Then there are the five new songs... The CD starts right out with four of them, and they are pretty, but also fairly uniform in terms of being slow, weepy tunes. I guess that's handy for hardcore fans who already have the other songs on the CD, but I think the producers made an error in starting the disc out that way. It kind of gets the proceedings off to a sluggish start. I'm thinking that Alison would not do four brand new songs in a row in a concert setting - she wouldn't want to destroy the momentum. So why do it on a collection of some of her best other work? So the new songs should have been spread throughout the album. Still, the volume and diversity of the material on Hundred Miles makes it a CD that more than justifies its existence. (My final musing (rant?) ... The overwhelming dominance of 5-star customer reviews for EVERYTHING new that comes out on this site makes me wonder what it would take for some of those reviewers to EVER rate something less than five stars... It must be nice to live in a world where everything is perfect!)
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
88 of 97 people found the following review helpful By Dave Goldberg on April 9, 2007
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
I get the sense that this album is a filler: something to put out there until Alison and Union Station come out with their next, hopefully soon.

It's still good _ more a pop album than country or bluegrass (other than "Sawing On the Strings'' and its all-star cast that includes Tony Rice, Sam Bush and Stuart Duncan as well as Union Station.) Nothing wrong with that _ Alison would be a pop diva (I actually hate that term) if she wanted to be. But it's still doesn't have the sequenced feel of most of her albums. More like One from Column A, another from column B, a third from Column C.

Again, a lot of it is really good. "Jacob's Dream'' is a striking folk tale _ I thought of a different version of the much-recorded "Long Black Veil.'' I'm sure I've heard "Country Boy,'' _ it sounds like something from a Broadway musical. What surprised me is that one of the writers is Fred Hellerman, who has to be the same Fred Hellerman who teamed with Pete Seeger and others with the Weavers, a huge folk act in the early '50s until they were blacklisted.

In any case, a nice collection while we wait for more.
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
82 of 91 people found the following review helpful By ifromtennessee on April 8, 2007
Format: Audio CD
This CD, which does not pretend to be bluegrass music, suffers from the absence of the Union Station musicians and the lack of upbeat songs. The best song, "Jacob's Dream," is about the death of two pioneer children. Alison Krauss has beautiful vocals, but I was not entertained by the material. The last CD by Alison Krauss and Union Station, "Lonely Runs Both Ways." is terrific.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
63 of 71 people found the following review helpful By Crawford D. Ferguson on April 7, 2007
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
This Girl sings like no one else, but this CD could use a little jacking up. If it's mood music you want this may do it but don't look for any peppy stuff in this CD. Had I heard what was on it I would have passed it up.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
64 of 76 people found the following review helpful By Douglas Allen on April 13, 2007
Format: Audio CD
I had such high hopes for this album before it was showed up. Her previous releases with Union Station were artistic wonders - brilliant musicianship and thoughtful lyrics that required repeated listening to fully understand the complex relationships and stories that were presented. I couldn't wait to hear what they had been cooking up. Unfortunately, they didn't do any cooking on this album and I sincerely hope this is an aberration. I WANT to assume that someone simply gave her some bad advice or pushed her (I like to think kicking and screaming) to release some pabulum and make a quick buck. Until I hear differently, I'll continue to hold out hope that she's in the recording studio with Union Station working on another wonderful album.

The song writing here doesn't hold a candle to "New Favorite" and "Lonely Runs Both Ways" and the performances themselves are pleasant enough (upon repeated listening, about four of the songs on "Miles" are keepers) but they are not the excellent work that I have associated with her in the past. Alison has the capability to sing the most beautiful, clear tone and only occasionally (to good effect) let a breathy tone in. "Hundred Miles" reverses this trend as she over-uses a breathy tone and in doing so lowers herself into the sea of mediocre, but pleasant singers that she previously soared above. Her song choices (please tell me that someone ELSE chose this mess of tunes for this album) are an embarrassment.
Read more ›
2 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Search

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?