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The Hundredth Name Library Binding – September 1, 1995


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Product Details

  • Age Range: 5 and up
  • Library Binding: 32 pages
  • Publisher: Boyds Mills Pr; 1st edition (September 1995)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1563971836
  • ISBN-13: 978-1563971839
  • Product Dimensions: 11.2 x 10.2 x 0.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.2 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 3.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (5 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #3,300,833 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

Originally published in Cricket magazine, this quiet tale set "far back in time" in Muslim Egypt conveys the lessons of a foreign culture and its enduring religiosity. Salah is distressed because his camel, Quadiim, seems sad. His father tries to reassure him: "Here on earth we poor mortals must live and die knowing only ninety-nine names for Allah, our God, though there are, in truth, one hundred names, and the last one is the most important. But do we walk about dejected, head down, shuffling our feet? No! We work, we eat, we care for each other." And, he concludes, "We pray!" Drawing his own interpretation, Salah fervently bids Allah to let the camel learn the 100th name. The following day, the animal stands proud and tall, a "look of infinite wisdom" on its face. Oppenheim's (Appleblossom) lucid, gentle storytelling conjures up the worshipful atmosphere of Salah's home, even if the exact significance of specific points (like Allah's 100 names) may elude the target audience. Hays's (The Boy Who Loved Morning) paintings, obviously carefully researched, ably suggest a timeless setting. Rendered in acrylics on gessoed linen canvas so that the grain shows through, effectively hazy art captures the spiritual quality of the tale. Ages 4-8.
Copyright 1995 Reed Business Information, Inc.

From School Library Journal

Kindergarten-Grade 3?Set in a Muslim village in Egypt, this tale of friendship and faith is warm and satisfying. Salah lives in a mud-brick house on the banks of the Nile. Contented with his own life, he feels sad because his beloved camel, Qadiim, always seems so solemn and unhappy. Father does not understand the boy's concern for an animal he thinks of as an "...obstinate, stupid, ugly beast," but he comforts his son. He explains that mortals must learn to live knowing only 99 names for Allah, when it is the 100th name that is most important. That night, Salah thinks about his father's words, deciding that Qadiim should be told the 100th name. Outside, beneath the moon, he unrolls his father's prayer rug and makes his first prayer to Allah. In the morning, Qadiim stands tall and proud, wearing a look of "infinite wisdom." Told with sincerity and dignity, this tale skillfully weaves together cultural and religious images. The plot is filled with details of everyday life, and many descriptive phrases are tied to the landscape. With their textures, patterns, and muted color scheme, Hays's handsome acrylic-on-linen illustrations create a strong sense of place. Smaller, more detailed insets sometimes accompany the larger paintings, and the visual story unrolls with the grace and serenity of Father's prayer rug.?Joy Fleishhacker, New York Public Library
Copyright 1996 Reed Business Information, Inc.

Customer Reviews

3.6 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Freda C. Shamma on May 27, 2008
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I wish the author had done his research - his description of Muslim prayer is wrong; he is geographically inaccurate - Egyptian farmers do not use camels - they use donkeys and water buffalos. The story itself is lovely, showing warm relationships between father and son, and an admirable desire to be good to animals.
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10 of 12 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on June 10, 1999
Format: Paperback
I'm ordering this book to use at a summer school for Baha'i children. Baha'is believe that we know the Hundreth Name which is also the Greatest Name of God and we often call ourselves the Community of the Greatest Name. To find this book in our local library was a gift. It is such a generous view of an Islamic family and shows much love between a father and son. It will be very popular story with my children.
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By Barbie on January 11, 2012
Format: Paperback
A touching story about a good father, his gentle son and a camel that is granted a reason to smile (It prompted me and the kids to look at pictures of camels afterwards to see if they really do look like they are smiling. It's like one of those "How the zebra got its stripes" book). I'm not a Muslim (this was required school reading), but I rate the book due to the good example shown for children that a father is praying to God and that his young son follows suit out of love for his beloved camel. Being a city dwelling nature lover, I also like the pictures of simple and happy village life.
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0 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Dr_A. on December 3, 2009
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
My daughter and I loved this tale about a boy and his camel. This could be a good book for both an English-speaking Muslim-American child or a non-Muslim looking for ethnic and international flavor to add to a book shelf. For the younger set, the book is just long enough and interesting enough to hold them to the very end and not too long that the adult tires of reading. For an early reader it might be a challenge, but certainly appropriate for a 3rd-4th grade independent reader. What fun!
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0 of 20 people found the following review helpful By Scott on October 14, 2009
Format: Paperback
I found this book in a public school library. What a travesty that our children can be presented with stories that praise the name of Allah in prayer, yet cannot find one book about praising the name of Jesus Christ. If separation between church and state exists at all, then it should exist for all faiths, not just the Christian faith. Either all or none my friends! Sadly, this book was paid for by federal tax dollars as a part of a Title I public school library. Where's the uproar we hear anytime the name of Jesus is mentioned? Our federal tax dollars at work!
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