Hunger and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Buy New
$5.76
Qty:1
  • List Price: $5.99
  • Save: $0.23 (4%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Only 5 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
Add to Cart
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Hunger Paperback – January 1, 2008


See all 2 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
$5.76
$3.95 $3.74

Special Offers and Product Promotions


Frequently Bought Together

Hunger + The Stranger
Price for both: $14.07

Buy the selected items together
  • The Stranger $8.31

Customers Who Viewed This Item Also Viewed

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

New Adult Fiction by Rainbow Rowell
Acclaimed author Rainbow Rowell's latest book, Landline, offers a poignant, humorous look at relationships and marriage. Learn more

Product Details

  • Paperback: 104 pages
  • Publisher: Digireads.com (January 1, 2008)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1420931253
  • ISBN-13: 978-1420931259
  • Product Dimensions: 9 x 6 x 0.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 6.4 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #958,232 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

4.0 out of 5 stars
5 star
0
4 star
2
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
See both customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

Format: Kindle Edition
In Knut Hamsun's Hunger, the narrator and protagonist roams the streets of Kristiania (Oslo) and searches for food and later lodging. A writer of questionable success, he submits his writings to a journal but rarely gets the story accepted. Without money, he often doesn't eat for days.

As we read the novel, we dwell into the mind occasionally delusion of a man trying to maintain his dignity in poverty. Though he had no food, he gives money to children and vagrants. And though he fancies a girl, he feels unworthy of her. His unstable state of mind reminds us of Raskolnikov in Dostoyevsky's Crime and Punishment. And indeed, Hunger is as much a psychological novel as Dostoyevsky's classic work but it dwells into the unstable mind in greater details.

Through the novel, Hamsun comments on Oslo's coming of age and on civilization crossing into the twentieth century. The narrator's interactions with others reveal the alienation in a modern city. His plight and despair, and his suffering and struggles are those of modern men and women. In the end, he leaves Kristiania, a symbol of his escaping from the modern life.

Hunger is a powerful tale of the currents of history sweeping individuals off their grounds of existence and tossing them into an ocean of despair. Even now, more than a hundred years later, we confront similar challenges and the novel remains relevant. The question was and is: how shall we respond to such challenges?
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 5 people found the following review helpful By EliteLamo on March 13, 2010
Format: Paperback
The writing may not seem vagrant in regards to other in its genre. I thank Hamsun for that at best. The book seemingly turns the pages itself. It reads like a hurricane, simply lending its hand to our minds eye and lets us into the jaded world of the protagonist and that is what glues the text together, his emotions.

While I don't share the accolades of it being stark reality and frighteningly stark and realistic, in fact I don't believe it to be worded harshly at all, in fact it makes hunger and the struggle for success in absolute poverty all the more appealing, and even more poetic as such.

This was a recommendation from my Harvard Creative writing teacher, who said pay particular attention to who translates it, as it is the key to really understanding Knut's true feelings.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Customer Images

Search

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?