Hunger Mountain: A Field Guide to Mind and Landscape and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Qty:1
  • List Price: $14.00
  • Save: $2.05 (15%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
In Stock.
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
Hunger Mountain: A Field ... has been added to your Cart
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: Book has minimal wear. The pages are clean and unmarked. Pages are straight. Prime available. Guaranteed delivery by Amazon.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 3 images

Hunger Mountain: A Field Guide to Mind and Landscape Paperback – November 13, 2012


See all 2 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
$11.95
$6.86 $6.54

Best Books of the Year
See the Best Books of 2014
Looking for something great to read? Browse our editors' picks for 2014's Best Books of the Year in fiction, nonfiction, mysteries, children's books, and much more.
$11.95 FREE Shipping on orders over $35. In Stock. Ships from and sold by Amazon.com. Gift-wrap available.

Frequently Bought Together

Hunger Mountain: A Field Guide to Mind and Landscape + Mountain Home: The Wilderness Poetry of Ancient China + Classical Chinese Poetry: An Anthology
Price for all three: $49.15

Buy the selected items together

Editorial Reviews

Review

"A gorgeous book, a book of power, the very opposite of mystical. If you have a special mountain in your life, you'll read it with understanding; if you don't, it will make you want to get one!"—Bill McKibben, author of The End of Nature and Eaarth: Making a Life on a Tough New Planet

"A beautiful and compelling meditation on consciousness and the cosmos through a series of peregrinations around and beyond the intricacies of Chinese philosophy. The erudition is staggering, the spiritual aspiration profoundly moving. I couldn’t put this guidebook down, into the night, a diamond moon over my shoulder, and suddenly it was radiant dawn. A unique and dazzling achievement."—Anne Waldman, author of The Iovis Trilogy

About the Author

David Hinton, through his many translations of classical Chinese poetry, has earned wide acclaim for creating compelling contemporary poems that convey the actual texture and density of the originals. He is also the first translator in over a century to translate the four seminal masterworks of Chinese philosophy: the Tao Te Ching, Chuang Tzu, the Analects, and Mencius. He has been awarded a Guggenheim Fellowship, numerous fellowships from the National Endowment for the Arts and the National Endowment for the Humanities, and both of the major awards given for poetry translation in the United States: the Landon Translation Award, from the Academy of American Poets, and the PEN Translation Award, from the PEN American Center. His most recent book is his monumental Classical Chinese Poetry: An Anthology.
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Best Books of the Month
Best Books of the Month
Want to know our Editors' picks for the best books of the month? Browse Best Books of the Month, featuring our favorite new books in more than a dozen categories.

Product Details

  • Paperback: 144 pages
  • Publisher: Shambhala (November 13, 2012)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1611800161
  • ISBN-13: 978-1611800166
  • Product Dimensions: 5 x 0.5 x 7.7 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 5.6 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (17 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #89,878 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

4.5 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

15 of 15 people found the following review helpful By Howard Herscovici on November 30, 2012
Format: Paperback
This book by David Hinton, well known translator of classic Chinese literature, is a fully human book. It is the meditations of a man whose relationship with the world has been shaped by his intimate knowledge of the peoples and ideas of ancient China. It is a rare book that both educates (I am starting to learn how to create Chinese characters and his explanations are precise and evocative) and inspires. He is both rigorously academic and openly emotional about his relationship to his world and to his area of study.

I would recommend this book for anyone who has studied Chinese thought, Taoism in particular, but also for those spiritual seekers who are inspired by nature writing of the highest order.

I can't recommend this book more highly.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
11 of 11 people found the following review helpful By Ikkyu Jones on December 13, 2012
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
"Hunger Mountain" appears to be the culmination of David Hinton's many years as a translator of ancient China's finest, most singular poets. For those seeking a clear-eyed, insightful, poetic explication on the subtle twists of language meets Tao, meets Zen, meets the human mind: "Hunger Mountain" is the place. Hinton has brought to life what often passes as a jangle of abstractions and second hand revelations regarding the nature of the Way, at least in today's "Zen and the art of everything" culture. Simply put, he opens a window into some of the Tao's most arcane subjects while managing to entertain with his own inner-narrative. Worth more than one read.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
13 of 15 people found the following review helpful By Acorn on April 22, 2013
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Hunger Mountain is in the Green Mountains of Vermont in the United States. David Hinton, a prize-winning translator of classical Chinese poetry and philosophical works, lives with his family near the mountain and regularly climbs the peak for the purposes of solitude and reflection. His understanding of the worldview of classical Chinese literature informs the way he looks at the mountain. Mountains were significant for ancient Chinese sages and poets because they linked heaven and earth. Many ancients lived as hermits in mountain caves and retreats and their writing and paintings were often inspired by their experiences of communing with nature.

Each of the chapters in this book has a Chinese character or group of characters as its title, with a literal English translation beneath. (Where Hinton does provide a transliteration of the Chinese, he uses the old Wade-Giles system rather than pinyin.) Hinton explores the meanings of the characters, often reaching back to early pictograms that were precursors of classical Chinese script. He sees the pictorial nature of Chinese script as an important element in classical Chinese thought which rejected the dualism of a self reflecting on the world in favour of an empirical perception of the world unmediated by a framework of ideas.

This drive for an immediate community with the empirical world is a fundamental feature of both Taoism and Chan (later Zen) Buddhism. Techniques such as meditation, seclusion, walking in wild places and pondering insoluble riddles were all aimed at overcoming the confines of conscious thought and being at one with the world. Hinton has tried some of these and they influence how he experiences Hunger Mountain.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Toinette Lippe on January 30, 2013
Format: Paperback
David Hinton writes here not only about his mountain peregrinations but about ancient Chinese cosmology, which was based on the relationship between vast emptiness and continual regeneration--the constant shift between nothing and everything. His book has completely revolutionized how I see the world. He writes exquisitely about how forgetting is the way creation is set up. Letting go of what has just happened enables us to be in the present again and again. Now, instead of seeing increasing forgetfulness as a minus, I see it as a way of releasing what I don't need right now, enabling me to come into the present moment. And I find that whatever I need to remember floats back into my mind at just the right time, so I've learned to trust this.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By tao man on March 28, 2013
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This is a great book for anyone interested in the Taoist or Buddhist concept of emptiness. Hinton is a wonderful translator of Classical Chinese literature and in this book shares his own understanding and wisdom as it has grown through the exposure to that body of work. The book is full of rich, vivid writing about nature, poetry, and the Chinese language.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Secluded Path on February 10, 2013
Format: Paperback
In this fine little book David Hinton gives us his thoughts and insights arising from his experiences walking along mountain trails. To his beautiful style the author adds many scholarly details on Chinese culture, cosmology and language. As a big fan of his translations, the quality of this book and the depth of the poetry did not come as a surprise. I enjoyed this book utterly!
Having said that, I also think that the book is not for everyone. Some parts are dense and I doubt that people not already in love with Nature, poetry and also seriously acquainted with Chinese poetry and culture will withstand, let alone enjoy, the book. In my opinion this book is perfect for a very particular type of person (like me!) who loves and enjoys Nature and poetry, while also loving, admiring and sometimes practicing philosophy in the ancient Chinese way. People with different tastes might surely need to consider reading something else.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews

Set up an Amazon Giveaway

Amazon Giveaway allows you to run promotional giveaways in order to create buzz, reward your audience, and attract new followers and customers. Learn more
Hunger Mountain: A Field Guide to Mind and Landscape
This item: Hunger Mountain: A Field Guide to Mind and Landscape
Price: $11.95
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?