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Hunters of Dune Unknown Binding – January 1, 2006


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Product Details

  • Unknown Binding
  • Publisher: TOR (2006)
  • ASIN: B004VT588U
  • Average Customer Review: 3.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (227 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #10,074,232 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Customer Reviews

He reads the book.
Dan Shaffer
In Brian Herbert and Kevin J Anderson's Dune the Plot drives the Characters.
Demishadow
I suffered through this book just to get to the end of the overall story.
Mateos

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

195 of 204 people found the following review helpful By Jonathan C. Pike on September 1, 2006
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I really did. I went into this novel with the most optimistic mindframe possible. Brian's work with the original Dune Prequels (the "House" ones) were really not that bad. I enjoyed them, to some extent, because at least he wasn't messing around too much with the Dune timeline we were familiar with. The "Butlerian Jihad" trilogy was... less impressive. It left a sour taste in my mouth. But nevertheless, I resolved to give "Hunters" a fair chance. I told myself: "I accept Frank Herbert's genius was not passed onto his son. I understand Brian will use a different literary style, with less emphasis on the complex interplay of politics, religion, and philosophy. He'll include a lot of meaningless action scenes and write at a lower level. It won't bother me".

It did bother me. A whole lot. Here why:

The * NO spoiler * parts that sucked

- He's writing for middle school kids. Seriously. The writing style is so simplistic it's insulting to an adult reader. He's basically telling us all we're morons who can't remember what happened 20 pages ago, let alone what happened in previous Dune novels. The result? TONS of unnecesary recap of previous storylines, both Frank's and Brian's. Conversations involving characters who both know the same thing, yet explain it to each other for 5 pages (i.e. the audience is dumb, let's break it down for them). And overuse of the same stupid words over and over. I swear, between his 2 prequel trilogies and "Hunters" he's used the word "esoteric" 156 times. Get a thesaurus!

- The characters are denser than blocks of wood. They're all so stupid it's insane. Remember the incredible intuitive leaps characters like Odrade would make?
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279 of 304 people found the following review helpful By Bart Leahy on August 27, 2006
Format: Hardcover
I have been a long-time fan of Frank Herbert's Dune series, even when it started heading into strange territory with Heretics of Dune and Chapterhouse: Dune. I read The Butlerian Jihad and started reading House Harkonnen before throwing it away with great force (following Twain's advice that some books should not be thrown away lightly). In truth, Brian Herbert is not the writer his father was, even with the assistance of Mr. Anderson. I gave Hunters of Dune a chance because it is supposed to be based on an outline by the old man himself, and because I was curious to see how one could follow up on the rather ambiguous ending of Chapterhouse. Infuriatingly, this book has not done very well, and it is one of two, leaving another book--Sandworms of Dune--to come.

The book infuriates me because it does NOT match the elegant prose, careful character study, and philosophical insight that made Frank Herbert's writing so rewarding. The biggest gap between father and son is subtlety. What Frank Herbert implied with a sentence, B. Herbert and Anderson drag out into a paragraph-long explanation. It's almost as if the authors underestimate the intelligence of the reader. Frank Herbert forced you up to his level, making you THINK, like good SF should.

There is another very disturbing trend in the Herbert/Anderson books, which is the utter lack of morality among the characters. There was almost no one I cared to admire in the book, except some of the innocents. Every other individual or society in the Dune universe has become brutal, coarsened, amoral, or utterly cynical. Even some of the more likeable characters from Chapterhouse--Duncan Idaho, Bellonda, Murbella, Sheanna--have become driven autocrats or corrupted souls.
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Format: Hardcover
Judged on its own merits Brian Herbert And Kevin Anderson's prequels and sequels to Herbert's pivotal novels lack subtly and that's because they are geared towards a dumbed down audience. The duo acknowledge that Frank's series as it progressed sold less and less and that's because the series became denser focusing on much larger issues even than in the first trio of books in the series.

That said HUNTERS OF DUNE does try to pick up the strands left hanging at the end of CHAPTERHOUSE. While it may suffer by comparison the duo create a solid adventure that will appeal to young SF readers who don't care or who haven't read the first three of novels by Herbert. To their credit the style is certainly breezier. Sure there's still clunky dialogue (there was in Frank's novels as well)but its clear that these novels are written with 30 years of change in writing styles,plotting, etc.

HUNTERS takes up where CHAPTERHOUSE left off. The novel does give run downs on what happened in the previous book since it was published in 1985. The Ithaca wanders space with a clone of Miles Teg, the ghola (a clone created from the dead DNA and with memories of the original person)of Duncan Idaho, Sheana and others. They are also being pursued by a group of Face Dancers that have infiltrated much of what remains of the government. The vast no-ship also carries stunted sandworms and the crew must avoid being captured by the Reverend Mother Marabella. The Bene Gesserit Sisterhood has taken in many of their dark counterparts the Honored Matres and corruption has seaped to the very core of their society.
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