Hussong plays Frescobaldi
 
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Hussong plays Frescobaldi

October 17, 2008

$8.99
Also available in CD Format
Song Title
Time
Popularity  
1
Canzon Settima detta La Tarditi
1:57
2
Canzon Prima Detta La Rovetta
2:25
3
Capriccio di Durezze
5:35
4
Canzon Terza detta La Crivelli
2:37
5
Capriccio sopra La Bassa Fiamenga
4:27
6
Corrente Prima, Seconda, Terza, Quarta
2:55
7
Canzon Sesta detta La Pesenti
2:38
8
Canzona Terza
3:14
9
Toccata Cromaticha
6:11
10
Canzon Decima detta La Paulini
2:15
11
Corrente e Ciaccona
1:06
12
Capriccio Cromatico con Ligature al Contrario
4:49
13
Bergamasca
3:43
14
Toccata Ottava di durezze e ligature
5:05
15
Canzon Quarta detta La Scacchi
3:10

Product Details

  • Original Release Date: December 1, 1999
  • Label: Thorofon Records
  • Copyright: 1999 Bella Musica Edition
  • Genres:
  • ASIN: B001H4R1GO
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,003,519 Paid in MP3 Albums (See Top 100 Paid in MP3 Albums)

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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Hand-held Reed Organ? February 9, 2001
Format:Audio CD
Purists may balk, but this music sounds great on the accordion. As usual, Hussong puts out an album that is absolutely beautiful. If, for some reason, one hates the sound of the instrument, then avoid it. Or should that be the case? This may change ingrained prejudices, as Hussong's performances have changed mine. This guy is an amazing talent. Just listen to the control of the left hand on those buttons and explain to me how he does it. This record is a perfect relaxed complement to his Bach albums, which are nothing less than mind-boggling. Surely, Frescobaldi is grinning.
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5.0 out of 5 stars a revelation June 22, 2011
Format:Audio CD
I'm a great fan and a diehard advocate of the concert accordion, both in contemporary music and when it comes to playing 18th Century keyboard music (Bach and Scarlatti have been the most eagerly visited by accordionists - I wish they did more Haendel, Couperin and Rameau). In contemporary music the instrument's timbral richness and eeriness has inspired many composers - Gubaidulina and Kagel among the most prominent - to write great compositions. As for 18th century keyboard music, the accordion seems to me to an ideal instrument, superior in many respects to the harpsichord and even the piano: it has the sharpness of attack and digital virtuosity of both; but it also has the ability to sustain the sound, like a wind or string instrument, or like the voice, whereas piano and harpsichord, where the vibration starts decaying as soon as it is produced, can only try and simulate a real legato. But the accordion also scores over the organ with its clearer basses (those of organ are often "muddied" and indistinct), making it an instrument ideally suited to polyphony. Finally, I find that the accordion offers a timbral richness that is much superior to the (to my ears) relatively dry and monochromatic harpsichord.

This CD of Frescobaldi played by Stephan Hussong is a good case in point. Although I had heard contemporary compositions for the instrument before, I think it is Hussong and his recording of Bach's Goldberg Variations that made me an instant believer of the accordion as a substitute for piano or harpsichord in 18th (or, as here, 17th) Century music (available on this website only as an mp3 download,
... Read more ›
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