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17 of 18 people found the following review helpful
on May 25, 2010
This book was an easy and fun read, but I feel like Ozzy left out a lot of things that his fans would have appreciated. Perhaps that's for another book? The early Black Sabbath part of his life was well detailed and had he kept up that level of detail for the rest of the book then I would have given it 5 stars. He spent all of 2 sentences on Zakk Wylde, who was with him longer than any other guitarist during his solo career. The story of how they came to be is a really good one and I would have loved to hear Ozzy's take on it. There was no mention of Jake E Lee (that I remember), nor Joe Holmes. What about his singing roots? He just mentioned that his dad bought him a PA system and the family liked to get together and do sing-a-longs. It can't be that simple. I think the main problem with the book was that it was very cliche and vague, spending too much time detailing the unsavory and fantastically over the top antics of his life.
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9 of 10 people found the following review helpful
on October 3, 2010
I'll try to keep this short and sweet. "I Am Ozzy" was a fun book to read for fans of Ozzy. I was a little worried that this book would be a family friendly version of his life in order to cash in on the people that are fans of his reality show instead of his music. Well, that's not a problem here. He doesnt hold back. The book contains many drug and booze references that make you laugh without glorifying them. Like other people have said, this book aint for the Peta crowd, either. If you want to read tales of crazy Ozzy, this is the book for you.

The book does have it's flaws, though. He warns you as much in the intro. Memory loss and blackouts did take a toll. The most glaring example was a story he told about a concert that he played in Tyler, Tx. I actually grew up in Tyler and was a kid when Ozzy was booked to play there at The Oil Palace. I remember it like it was yesterday because that was a pretty big deal for the Prince of Darkness to be playing a show in my crappy hometown that is located right in the heart of the Bible Belt. In the book he says he played the gig, went out on the town till 7 a.m, and then got into a brawl with a coffee shop full of Bible thumpers the next day. I can assure you that this episode did not take place in Tyler. First of all, the concert never happened. It got cancelled. And there is no out on the town till 7am in Tyler. Tyler is in a dry county. All the bars close at midnight. Ozzy has his facts scrambled. In a previous chapter, Ozzy mentioned some show in Texas that had been cancelled due to bomb threats involving stloen explosives. That was the Tyler show. That one cancelled Tyler show was the only time Ozzy was ever booked in the city. So who knows where the coffee shop brawl with the religious right actually happened? And who knows what other facts were skipped or confused because of the drug haze?

All things considered, I enjoyed the book. If you like Ozzy, you WILL like the book. The 388 pages will go by very fast. You WILL laugh. Some of you might want more details. I doubt that the Tyler story was the only one that has lost its accuracy over the years. After reading this book, we are lucky that the dude remembered anything at all.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
on November 10, 2011
I Am Ozzy is a hilarious autobiography by Ozzy Osbourne, former lead singer of Black Sabbath. It's filled with humourous anecdotes from his life before and after the band and is a more than enjoyable read.

I've read a few musician's autobiographies, and I can honestly say that none of them have ever made me laugh like this one did. I was laughing aloud at something on almost every page and I loved Ozzy's British humour. There were some great stories about his time in the band and although the book was filled with humour, Ozzy also showed a sensitivity when it came to writing about the hard things, like death and drug addiction.

Although I loved the book and the stories in it, I couldn't help get the feeling that maybe there was some extra spice being added to some of the anecdotes. I mean, yeah, he was a crazy rocker, but after all these years and all these drugs, can he really remember as much as he claims to? Maybe so, but for me it didn't quite feel right, so I was unable to fully `click' with the book. It's a real shame, because I really did enjoy Ozzy's easy writing style.

I Am Ozzy was a fun read, but overall something just didn't come together for me. If you're looking for a musician's autobiography that has plenty of hilarity go for this one, but just don't expect too much depth.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
on February 12, 2013
If there was an individual who really tried to kill himself and utterly failed, it's Ozzy! He really tries here, and though it is not up to par with The Dirt level of Rock n' Roll autobiographies, Ozzy is as candid as he is allowed to be; which is why I give it three stars. His facts are muddled and hazy. And, there's a lot of rehash from Sharon's autobiography that gets a rearranged treatment here. Ever the watchful eye, Sharon made sure Ozzy would not cast himself in too negative a light. But, isn't that what an autobiography is supposed to be - a ball's to the wall confession. Not always pretty, but damn entertaining. There's a lot Ozzy avoids talking about here; and while Ozzy can be excused due to the fog of excessive drug and alcohol abuse, the rehashing of events in a different order from Sharon's earlier published autobiography is not something one can overlook. I just wish Ozzy felt the freedom to really let go and talk candidly about his past and his feelings about that past, instead of holding back because someone was looking over his shoulder.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
on August 29, 2011
Yes, I found this book impossible to put down. I loved it, and think Ozzy is an insane idiot after reading it. But, I would love to have dinner with he and his wife now, and I never would have thought that before.
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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
First off, I'm a sucker for almost anything Ozzy, even though his career took a dive a while ago. So I bought Sharon's book and compared to it, Ozzy's book is almost exactly the same but the stories are in shuffled order.

It is funny and you will end up finding out some things new about him even as a hardcore fan, but it's a bit of a letdown to have read some of the same things a while ago in Sharon's book.

It's fun bathroom reading.
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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
I mostly was influenced to read this book by all the reviews that said it made them laugh a lot. Being a person who rarely laughs at anything, I thought I'd give it a shot, figuring that I was long overdue for a good laugh; but much to my disappointment, when I finally got the book and read it, I didn't even so much as chuckle slightly.

Having just finished the autobiography, I can't really imagine what everyone found so funny. The thing is mostly repetitious, mostly just focusing on a lot of endless drug and alcohol abuse. The book could have elaborated more on his early life, the thoughts and motives that influenced the writer of the book, things of that sort. Instead, we just get a sense that everything was simply random: grow up in a small town in England, act crazy and rebellious, have a few nice coincidences work in your favor, and presto--instant rock star.

Between, the constant over-drinking, passing out, ending up in the hospital for swallowing too many pills, the blackouts, etc. there is very little substance here. Though the dove story was interesting, it was very brief. The Alamo story, also very brief. The bat story or his touring with Motley Crue, hardly a word. What went into the songwriting and relationship-wise, this book tells very little of and gives little sense of any intellectual processes that went on throughout any of the experiences told about. In the end, it comes off as just another story of a bum that made it. Or just about some rebellious person (no real explanation of what he rebelled against, really) who was at the right place at the right time.

At any rate, still fun to read for its price, especially if you can't find it in a library. I was pretty fascinated by all the self-abuse stories, and could not believe that a person could even survive what he survived. It's fascinating he didn't end up like Steve Clark or that guy from Milli-Vanilli. Something out there must definitely be looking out for Mr Osbourne, I'd imagine; at least that's something interesting to observe. All the same, there ARE much better biographies out there than this one. At least, this one alone just isn't enough. We may hope for something better in the near future.
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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
on March 13, 2011
I'm a huge fan of Ozzy's, have been for many years. By no means am I as dedicated or as long lasting a fan as others who will have read this book, and if I'm honest, I'm not that much into rock music at all. Ozzy has always seemed like a man that, despite his success, has managed to keep his feet firmly on the ground. Being fascinated by the character of Ozzy for quite a number of years, I was excited to hear that he'd brought a book out and looked forward to learning about a man I'd admired for a long time. No doubt this book is informative, and at times, very funny, but it wasn't quite what I had expected.

I am not one to read these celebrity type books, and let's face it, this is yet another one that is just a cheap cash-in on a famous name. It's clear from the get-go that the actual writer (co-written by Chris Ayres because of Ozzy's dyslexia) wanted to give a "conversations with Ozzy" feel. He clearly wanted to give the feeling that you were sitting in the same room with the man and he was telling you the story of his life as if Ozzy and the reader were sat in the pub together. The attempt of it failed miserably, which I found immensely disappointing. It didn't quite flow as you would expect and I constantly felt like I was reading a book, and not discovering the life of Ozzy.

To not sound completely nuts I'll try and explain. When reading a good book, you lose yourself in the pages. This isn't exclusive to fantasy novels where you envisage yourself taking part in the intimacies of the story, or can simply picture the events as if watching a superb movie. A good writer can achieve the same effect from an autobiography to the point where you forget you're reading a book and actually feel like you're having the conversation with the person you're reading about. That was never achieved with this book, which is wholly disappointing. All the hardcore Ozzy fans should definitely give this a read, but I'm not promising you will be able to lose yourself in the pages.
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on May 20, 2014
I am Ozzy by Ozzy Osbourne, a Kindle book I started reading on March 28th. He and I have the same birthday (and, in reading this book, I also discovered that we both don't have a driver's license) and I consider myself to be a casual hit-single fan of his music and Black Sabbath's. Also, I frequently recall his reality show's episode where he's obsessed with Chipotle and putters around the house, asking family members, "Errybudah wuhuhburrito?"

Written chronologically from childhood to present, it instantly reminded me of Keith Richards' bio that I read very recently, since they both seemed to be born in industrial post-WWII British towns amid a big family but where nothing seems to go on. However, Ozzy seemed to have some more time to himself before he became involved in a band; his 'lost' years, I guess, which he became invested in Beatlemania, meat packing, and being the occasional public nuisance. Then, considering both books, Ozzy went down a decidingly more abstract bent than Keith's bluesy rock. Then, once Polka Tolk Blues Band/Earth/Black Sabbath got together, it became a little more abstract as they play gigs foreign and domestic amid drugs, drug crackdowns, highs from drugs, tragedies, rehab, Satanists (they were not invited nor welcome, apparently), interactions with other bands and artists, public indecency, a haunted house, kids and breakups. And Sharon. Before, during, and after Ozzy's involvement with Black Sabbath, it makes for such an interesting and engrossing book that I felt the need to watch seasons one through three of the Osbournes reality show the weekend after I'd finished it to understand and recognise references between the episodes and the book.
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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
on June 3, 2011
I'm half way through I Am Ozzy and am beginning to tire of excesses and destructive behavior. However, up until now, I've been surprised by how normal and vulnerable Ozzy is from childhood on. He is certainly brave or naive when he reveals behavior that he now regrets to all his readers!! It has been a good read so far.
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