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I Dreamed of Africa (movie tie-in) Paperback – April 1, 2000


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 336 pages
  • Publisher: Penguin Books; Tie-in edition (April 1, 2000)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0140287442
  • ISBN-13: 978-0140287448
  • Product Dimensions: 8.9 x 5.9 x 0.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 13.6 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (79 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #84,750 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

Both a dream fulfilled and personal tragedy are revealed in this moving memoir. As a child living in Italy, the author was fascinated with Africa. Then, in 1972 at 25, divorced and with a young son, she visited Kenya with her then-fiance, Paolo Gallmann. context is absent, with only "at 25" above They settled on a ranch on the Laikipia Plateau at the edge of the Great Rift Valley. With an abundance of nearby wildlife--elephants, rhino, buffalo--the Gallmanns enjoyed an idyllic life among an expatriate community. Then, in 1981, when they were expecting a child, Paolo was killed in a traffic accident. Gallmann gave birth to a daughter, Sveva, and stayed on the ranch with her son, 14-year-old Emmanuele, who died of snakebite three years later. This heartrending account ok, to avoid repetition of "tragedy"? reveals its author's courage and strength. As a living memorial, she started a foundation ok? to avoid repeating "memorial" to explore ways to combine development with conservation. Photos not seen by PW. First serial to Cosmopolitan; author tour.
Copyright 1991 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From Library Journal

Since the movie Out of Africa there has been renewed interest in African memoirs. This work by a native Italian woman who gave up a comfortable life in her homeland to pursue a dream to live in Kenya should appeal to readers who were enthralled with Isak Dinesen, Elspeth Huxley, and Beryl Markham. Unfortunately, Gallman lacks the depth of feeling and literary qualities evident in those authors. Writing in a lyrical style that at times seems forced, Gallman describes her move to Africa at the age of 25 with her husband Paolo and son Emanuele. Both Paolo and Emanuele meet violent deaths, but Gallmann is determined to stay with her newborn daughter in Kenya. She starts a ranch and a foundation to preserve African wildlife from poachers. While her story is often entertaining, the book bogs down in relating her relationships with her husband and son. Purchase only where interest demands.
- Edell Marie Peters, Brookfield P.L., Wis.
Copyright 1991 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

More About the Author

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Customer Reviews

A beautiful and inspiring book.
DeeH
Her descriptive passages and her use of poetry as well as her quotes from her diary made this book such a pleasure to read.
Gerry
Excuse me, but I think any mother would be a little uneasy about their child having a lethal pet.
Betsy Green

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

77 of 85 people found the following review helpful By anja gordon on March 31, 2000
Format: Paperback
This book is the type of rare work that draws its readers into a whole other world by making them see and feel everything that the storyteller does. We become almost a part of the life of this extraordinary woman and her passion not only for Kenya and Africa but simply for life and living. Each one of us dreams of some place or ideal as we grow, but few of us are fortunate or determined enough to turn those dreams into realities and go on to live them. Kuki Gallman along with her husband and children shows us what it is like to achieve and live our dreams and at what cost our dreams sometimes come. "I Dreamed of Africa" is a lyrical, magical account of one woman, her family, and the people and customs of the last continent in our world that truly has a soul. The message of this book and Kuki's continuing mission to preserve that world will stay with all who read it and they will be better for it.
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32 of 34 people found the following review helpful By Alex on November 24, 2002
Format: Paperback
I have little to add to the other positive reviews of this book; but half the reviewers seem to be criticising the author, rather than the book. While I do not deny it has faults (the fact that English is not the author's first language sometimes weakens the expression of her clearly genuine feelings)I am astonished at the resentment expressed in many reviews. Specifically, over the fact that the author happens to be a white and presumably wealthy European - as though this fact automatically makes her a hypocrite and her views and experiences less worthy... and furthermore, that this a fault of the book itself! Judge the book on its own worth, instead of making moralistic judgments about the author.
Ms Gallman doesn't claim this is the ultimate African story - it is the personal story of her life, her deep love of Africa and of her friends and family, and in my opinion of her remarkably brave journey. Many reviewers seem to criticise this book for failing to be what it was never intended to be in the first place.
Oh, and all the spiteful comments about the "rich white Europeans" owning airplanes!!!
For God's sake, we are not talking about private luxury jets here! Clearly reviewers have completely disregarded that this is AFRICA, where people have immense properties, where it takes hours and hours to drive on dusty and dangerous roads to your nearest neighbours. How some people have gained the impression they were simply flitting about in style for their own pleasure is quite beyond me. About the only way of practical transport to most places was by plane, and it would seem these were small and often rundown planes, where people took their life in their hands each time they flew them. So please, get over the fact that most people had planes!!
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19 of 19 people found the following review helpful By Claus Hetting on March 18, 2002
Format: Paperback
This book is an autobiographical account of Kuki Gallman's life on a farm in the highlands of Kenya. On the rich backdrop of the African bush, Kuki tells of her life of adventure, including the colourful characters that became her family and friends.
Most memorable in the book are her heartbreaking experiences of losing her husband and her son, these events being vividly portrayed at length. Her valiant struggle to live through these tragedies and carry on with her life lends to us a sense of hope in the face of great adversity.
It would not be fair to compare this book to 'Out of Africa' and other classic African tales, since it is more a personal account of a life rather than a literary effort. The best part of the book is clearly the chapters on the death of her son, which are terribly moving, and at times chilling in their attention to detail and their realism. A little bit of criticism: sometimes her habit of packing a lot of adjectives into her sentences can make the book a bit tiring to read, and makes her style at times a bit mannered.
Overall the book is the account of a remarkable life. It is well worth reading, especially for Africa-philes.
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38 of 46 people found the following review helpful By Anita Rosenberg on March 2, 2000
Format: Paperback
An article in Architectual Digest lead me to this incredible autobiography which in turn lead me to Kuki Gallman and her magical Africa. I found the book captivating and a tribute to the human spirit. Visiting Kuki at her resort was one of the most memorable experiences of my life. Her book is truly what she represents. I still dream of Africa and its intoxicating scents, the magical wild animals that inhabit her world, the starry nights so close you feel you can reach up and touch them. My hope is to return to Lakipia and recapture the beauty of Africa. There is truly no place on earth like it.
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16 of 18 people found the following review helpful By L. Sanders on July 1, 2000
Format: Paperback
When I first began this book, I could not put it down. However, I had to continually refer back to try to figure out what had made Paulo & Kuki go to Africa in the first place - namely what was their occupation. I also was confused to where they lived. Was it Nairobi or Ol Ari Nyiro? From what I ascertained, their lives were very privileged. The number of white friends with airplanes, and obviously nothing better to do than "tea," was amazing. I also got weary of Kuki's ramblings of "Emanuele being like Paulo in this, that, this, that way...." We got the point! What was truly amazing was the fact that she did not forsee Emanuele's death even though he had a snake factory in their home. Not just a hobby of interesting snakes, but deadly ones. I know that each of us wants to allow our close ones to attain their dreams, etc., this one is totally unnecessary in an unsupervised or occupational atmosphere. When she related that she became two people in dealing with Paulo and Emanuele's death, I felt like she used that as an excuse. She had a role to play with her "close" friends, and she succeeded. I think most wierd is that she details two loves of her life after Paulo, but they just disappear in the monologues. What split them up? Also disappointing is the end not knowing what has happened to either Kuki or Sveva, just a note at the end about her beginning her diary, etc. What began as something I could not put down became something that I could not wait until it ended and it was only 311 pages.
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