I Hope You're Sitting Down

July 20, 2007 | Format: MP3

$8.99
Also available in CD Format
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Product Details

  • Original Release Date: September 20, 1994
  • Release Date: July 20, 2007
  • Label: Merge Records
  • Total Length: 1:07:04
  • Genres:
  • ASIN: B000U7SO1A
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (5 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #186,758 Paid in Albums (See Top 100 Paid in Albums)

Customer Reviews

4.6 out of 5 stars
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4 star
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

9 of 9 people found the following review helpful By mianfei on February 22, 2004
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
Without doubt a record that will never been fully appreciated, Lambchop's debut "I Hope You're Sitting Down" nonetheless stands as one of the most interesting albums of the 1990s. On first listen this record can appear to be nothing more than an easy-listening album from before the rock era, but in fact "I Hope You're Sitting Down" was/is completely different.

Despite feeling so sappy, the sound of "I Hope You're Sitting Down" possessed a rawness of production rarely seen since the late 1970s, which allows the many instruments to work together to produce a form of folk music quite different either from the traditonal folk of Europe or more contemporary types like Joan Baez and Joni Mitchell. The guitar lines of mainman Kurt Wagner and Bill Killebrew rarely come to the front, and the sound is dominated by strings and horns that push such songs as "Betweemus" and "Bon Soir, Bon Soir" into territory that is forbidding and desolate. The infamous suicide tale "Soaky In The Pooper" is even more extreme - it is remarkable to see such a desperate song dominated by such a soft string bass from Mike Doster, whilst other tracks like "The Pack-Up Song" feature Paul Niehaus' trombone as the lead instrument.

"Under The Same Moon" had an almost traditional guitar from Wagner. Indeed, the spontaneous, orchestrated character of the songs and the working class storytelling of Kurt Wagner's lyrics bear comparison with the Pogues' "Rum, Sodomy And The Lash". "I Will Drive Slowly" featured beautiful vocals from Deanna Varagona that sound like a lullaby and possess a melody so rare among "alternative" groups.

When Lambchop did move beyond simple acoustic music, the effect was psychedelic and even more surprising than on the slow songs that make up most of "I Hope You're Sitting Down".
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9 of 10 people found the following review helpful By Ron Mertens on July 29, 2003
Format: Audio CD
A brilliant debut by Lambchop. This band has amazing albums, and this is one of them. Surely some songs are a little weird, but there are some extremly beautiful gems here. If you like Lambchop, you must listen to their first album. If you don't like 'em, you've got a big problem ;-)
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Kurt Harding VINE VOICE on December 3, 2006
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
After years of seeing references to Lambchop in reviews of other CDs I own, I decided to give them a shot. Needless to say, I am not disappointed.

Many have compared them to Nick Cave, Tindersticks, and Calexico. Well, I don't find much of the spirit of Cave, but I do hear the instumental eccentricity of Tindersticks without Stuart Staples' oddly mesmerizing vocal elan. In the vocals, I hear much of the easy, languid style of Calexico without their Southwestern instrumental zing. I also detect a touch of Geronimo Trevino III in the delivery of Lambchop vocalist Kurt Wagner.

If you like any of the aforementioned artists, then Lambchop is likely to appeal to you. But all comparisons aside, Lambchop copies no one and is very much an original in its own right.

Though it took me a while to adjust to the style, I find I Hope You're Sitting Down a delightfully bleak recording. The unorthodox instrumentation only intensifies the downbeat mood. My favorites are the morbid Soaky In the Pooper, the mournful Under the Same Moon with its "Blue Velvet" musical undertones, Bon Soir, Bon Soir, Hickey, and another great downer, Let's Go Bowling. I also enjoy the album's only hard-driving cuts, Hellmouth and So I Hear You're Moving. About the only ones that leave me cold are What Was He Wearing and The Pack-up Song.

If you like your music on the edgy side and are new to Lambchop, why not start with this one? I am glad to have finally bought one of their CDs and after enjoying this, plan to continue exploring their music.
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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful By VampireCowboy VINE VOICE on July 6, 2009
Format: Audio CD
Lambchop is simply amazing. I'll let the other reviews do the talking and just say this: Listening to Lambchop is like finding the perfect denim jacket at a thrift store - ragged, comfortable and solid - and then, when you wear it the first time, finding a hundred dollar bill in the pocket. And maybe some Dutch clown porn.

If you don't love Lambchop, you will be left behind after the apocalypse.
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9 of 15 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on April 24, 1999
Format: Audio CD
Please please get this album (I'm listening to it.) If you don't mind some quirky and odd lyrics (they're sort of faulknerian or carver-esque), then it's just a thing of beauty. The lovely instrumentation, wordplay, and liquidy melodies will soften your heart. A couple of slightly unwound songs provide a bit of contrapuntal balance. Little slices of life; I've thought of this album the last two times I've seen the moon.
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