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I, Judas Mass Market Paperback


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Product Details

  • Mass Market Paperback: 337 pages
  • Publisher: Signet (August 1, 1978)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0451121139
  • ISBN-13: 978-0451082121
  • ASIN: 0451082125
  • Product Dimensions: 6.9 x 4.1 x 1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 7.2 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (17 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #944,973 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Customer Reviews

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See all 17 customer reviews
The well intentioned Judas is, himself, betrayed because of his very human nature.
felixa99@aol.com
Bottom line, this book would have got more stars from me if it wasn't such a slow, dull read for three-quarters of the novel.
RickyB
This book puts Jesus and the apostles, Lazarus, Mary and the rest in full three D. I highly recommend it.
Dragonfly

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

40 of 44 people found the following review helpful By Guillermo Maynez on November 26, 2000
Format: Audio Cassette
The idea of telling the world most famous story from the point of view of the most hated character in history is brave and good. Judas, the man Dante put in the last and most hideous circle of hell -that destined for the worst traitors- is here just a man, but not a mediocre man. By the time when Jesus was already preaching, Israel was in political turmoil (hasn't it always been?). Several political factions were conspiring against Roman rule. Of them, the zealots were one of the most radical.
Judas, apparently, was a member of this group and, simplifying Caldwell's plot, seems to have sincerely taken Jesus as the future King of Israel. This he would accomplish by political and revolutionary action. As Jesus refuses to take real action to depose the Romans, Judas gets disappointed and finally betrays the man he thought would lead them to victory, but instead kept on saying strange things, uncomprehensible for a man of action like Judas. I think no one can take away from Caldwell (a writer I don't really like) the merit of having written the story from Judas's point of view, in a reasonable and plausible plot. Just for that, it is worth reading it.
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17 of 19 people found the following review helpful By felixa99@aol.com on June 25, 1999
Format: Mass Market Paperback
The story of Jesus as seen through the eyes of his disciple Judas Iscariot. Heavy emphasis on the politics surrounding the minestry, betrayal and death of Jesus Christ. The well intentioned Judas is, himself, betrayed because of his very human nature.
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23 of 28 people found the following review helpful By Adam Fitzgerald on February 12, 2000
Format: Hardcover
Anyone who enjoys reading, fascinated with Christianity, or simply is Christian themself will take pleasure from this detailed, descriptive, accurate depiction of the Life and Death of Jesus Christ. While the termonology might take you off guard at first, and while I agree an previous understanding of the segmentation of Judea and the way in which it was positioned under Roman rule during the life of Christ can help, there is no requirement to take an apprecation from "I, Judas." Personally, at a time in my life when the world did not make much self, this book was one of the first things to interest me in the Person of Jesus Christ, and since then I have become a deep and committed Christian, and a future priests. The authors are in my deepest thanks and gratitude.
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8 of 9 people found the following review helpful By RickyB on August 15, 2007
Format: Mass Market Paperback
This is definitely not the most exciting book around. It's not going to have to staying up late to finish it, eagerly turning the next page. But it will get you thinking.
I love reading historical novels of this kind (especially with a religious or philosophical theme) that look to put a new slant on common beliefs and that get me thinking about things or relating a little better to historical or religious figures. I found this to be one of those novels.
However, although there is a lot of great information in this story and the authors have given a passionate and sympathetic insight into the life of one of Christianity's greatest "villians", it's important that readers remember this is an interpretation of events intermingled with opinion. I don't think this would be the best book for someone who is not familiar with the Greek scriptures. It would be easy to mistake a lot of the authors' conjecture for fact. Some points that are raised during the book though are very insightful and I recommend this book for all Christians, especially those faithfully submitting themselves to the teachings of their church instead of the teachings of the bible. The repeated insistence by Jesus himself that he is not God but God's son is one such point and I applaud the authors for highlighting this. That they also raise the question of Jesus' true birth date, a long held misnomer for Christians who celebrate it on Dec 25, is another good point.
Bottom line, this book would have got more stars from me if it wasn't such a slow, dull read for three-quarters of the novel. It did pick up speed towards the end though and so it's worth struggling through.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By jaco7 on April 2, 2013
Format: Mass Market Paperback Verified Purchase
Taylor Caldwell is one of the best writers I have ever read. For anyone interested in stories of the Bible. This book is great and well written. Highly recommended.
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Format: Mass Market Paperback
I don’t suppose it’d be much of a spoiler, to tell you how this story comes out. Jesus Christ is crucified and is buried and on the third day, he rises again from the dead. Sorry if I spoiled it for you but if you didn’t already know how it went for Jesus, you maybe shouldn’t read this book.
If you like exposition as dialogue, you’ll love the first forty or so pages of I, Judas. Palestine, in Judas’s time, was a very complicated place with Jews and Greeks and Romans and with a myriad of factions. There’s a lot to be “dumped” on the reader. The confusing maelstrom needs to be understood before the story gets going, so let’s just get it all out at the start, even if it means having three of the most erudite Jews of the time adorning everything they say with superfluous information already known by even the most ignorant peasant.
I, Judas was originally published in the mid-seventies and back then, exposition in dialogue, especially in historical novels, was considered acceptable. Today it’s a hoot but with Gamaliel and Annas and Caiaphas, along with Judas, it’s compelling, even as stilted dialogue, to watch the interplay of these bright, political minds. These are cunning men, each capably representing his own faction and what they’re saying is necessary stuff so don’t worry about the information dump. Just enjoy it, take it in, because once it’s all on the table, the story can get going.
Except it doesn’t, not so well.
The biggest disappointment for me was Jesus’s miracles. There was no awe. I suppose it must be a very difficult thing, to describe the effect of the miracles on the folks who witnessed them.
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