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I, Quantrill Mass Market Paperback – May 6, 2008


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Product Details

  • Mass Market Paperback: 256 pages
  • Publisher: Signet; First Edition edition (May 6, 2008)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0451223802
  • ISBN-13: 978-0451223807
  • Product Dimensions: 6.7 x 0.7 x 0.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 3.2 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (7 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #776,362 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Max McCoy is an award-winning novelist and journalist. He's a member of Mystery Writers of America and is the creator of the Ophelia Wylde paranormal mystery series.

The first book in the series, "Of Grave Concern," was launched in July 2013 at the Boot Hill Museum Complex in Dodge City, Kansas. The novel is set in 1877 in Dodge City and surroundings.

McCoy is also known for his dark and offbeat westerns (which have been described as "western noir") and his original Indiana Jones adventures for Bantam and licensed by Lucasfilm.

He won the Spur award for best novel in 2008 from the Western Writers of America for "Hellfire Canyon." It's the story of a 13-year-old boy and his mother who walk across Missouri during the Civil War and become part of the gang led by Alf Bolin, the notorious Ozark serial killer. "Hellfire Canyon" was also named a Kansas 2008 Notable Book.

In 2011, the third book in the "Hellfire" trilogy, "Damnation Road," also won a Spur. McCoy is the author of many other books, including the novelization of Steven Spielberg's epic miniseries, "Into the West."

His fiction debut, "The Sixth Rider," about the 1892 raid on Coffeyville's banks by the Dalton Gang, was published by Doubleday and won the Spur/Medicine Pipe Award for Best First Novel from Western Writers.

USA Today has described his writing as "powerful." In addition to westerns and historical fiction, McCoy also writes contemporary adventures. Publishers Weekly called his novel, "The Moon Pool," an "intelligent thriller... tightly drawn characters, a vile villain and a satisfying, thought-provoking conclusion make this a compelling read."

McCoy grew up in Baxter Springs and most of his books are set in Kansas or Missouri. He began his career in journalism at the Pittsburg Morning Sun and writing for pulp magazines such as "True Detective" and "Front-Page Detective." As investigative writer for The Joplin Globe, he won first-place awards in investigative journalism for his stories on serial killers and hate groups.

McCoy's an associate professor of journalism at Emporia State University at Emporia, Kansas, and director of the Tallgrass Writing Workshop.

Customer Reviews

4.3 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Patsy Terrell on October 12, 2009
Format: Mass Market Paperback
This is the first of Max McCoy's books I've read, but it won't be the last. He has created a story starring Quantrill, giving the reader a human look at this hated/loved figure. I'm not well-versed in the western genre, but I know a good story and this definitely qualifies. Once I started reading I didn't want to stop.
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Format: Kindle Edition
This is an interesting story about William Quantrill. I read it especially for the story of his raid on Lawrence, Kansas on August 21, 1863. It was a bloody and senseless act in my mind. Commanding approximately four hundred men, not in the regular war, but as renegage bushwhackers, they descended on the town in the early morning and killed every man and boy old enough to hold a gun.
Then they burned the homes of the widows and children they left unharmed, leaving them without shelter, without food, with out any means of livelihood. They even stole their horses and mules. To me it was a cowardly act. McCoy puts a human face on Quantrill in implying that on that fateful day, Quantrill sees the mangled and mutilated body of a young boy with a dog and crows interested in the boy's dead flesh. He shoots the dog and scares away the crows. A touch of humanness in the midst of cruel and senseless slaughter.
The book goes on to chronicle the life and death of Quantrill and was one of the best I read about him in regards to who he was, if there really is a way to know a man like him.
Eunice Boeve, author of Ride a Shadowed Trail
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Western fan or not, this one will pull you in and hold you in a fast paced adventure. McCoy is a master at using the proper voice for a time and place. As a reader I wasn't observing from afar, I was riding along on this journey with characters equal amounts despicable and endearing. Well done.
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Format: Mass Market Paperback
Granted, I, Quantrill is fiction, and Max McCoy creates a believable Quantrill whose first-person narration reveals the strengths and weaknesses of a man both revered and hated. First-person narration is always unreliable, which makes McCoy's novel all the more interesting to those who have read about the historical man. For the most part, the story is well-crafted, although I would have preferred a shorter denouement. The woman in black is a nice touch. Max McCoy drew me into Quantrill's world and his view of himself. I found the novel to be a page-turner.
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