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I, Robot (The Robot Series) [Kindle Edition]

Isaac Asimov
4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (389 customer reviews)

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Book Description

The three laws of Robotics:
1) A robot may not injure a human being or, through inaction, allow a human being to come to harm
2) A robot must obey orders givein to it by human beings except where such orders would conflict with the First Law.
3) A robot must protect its own existence as long as such protection does not conflict with the First or Second Law.

With these three, simple directives, Isaac Asimov changed our perception of robots forever when he formulated the laws governing their behavior. In I, Robot, Asimov chronicles the development of the robot through a series of interlinked stories: from its primitive origins in the present to its ultimate perfection in the not-so-distant future--a future in which humanity itself may be rendered obsolete.

Here are stories of robots gone mad, of mind-read robots, and robots with a sense of humor. Of robot politicians, and robots who secretly run the world--all told with the dramatic blend of science fact and science fiction that has become Asmiov's trademark.


From the Hardcover edition.


Editorial Reviews

Amazon.com Review

In this collection, one of the great classics of science fiction, Asimov set out the principles of robot behavior that we know as the Three Laws of Robotics. Here are stories of robots gone mad, mind-reading robots, robots with a sense of humor, robot politicians, and robots who secretly run the world, all told with Asimov's trademark dramatic blend of science fact and science fiction.

Review

An exciting science thriller...' New York Times

Product Details


Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews
116 of 121 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Brilliant stories about man and robot August 1, 2004
Format:Mass Market Paperback
Isaac Asimov, the grand master of modern science fiction, wrote this classic collection of stories as the first in his Robot novel series. It deals with the relationships between human and robot. As one of Asimov's earliest novels, it introduced the Three Laws of Robotics that have set the standard for the use of robots in science fiction. In fact, Asimov was the acknowledged creator of the term "robotics."

The stories are tied together via the reminiscences of Dr. Susan Calvin, a robopsychologist for U. S. Robot and Mechanical Men, the corporation that invented and manufactured intelligent robots and computing machines. She reflects upon the evolution of these robots and discusses how little humanity really understands about the artificial intelligence it has created. Each story illuminates a problem encountered when a robot interprets the three fundamental Laws and something goes awry. One robot questions the reason for his existence. Another feels a necessity to lie. Yet another has an ego problem. The later stories introduce the reader to the Machines, powerful computing robots without the typical humanoid personalities of the working robots, that control the economic and industrial processes of the world and that stand between mankind and destruction. These stories introduce some fascinating and sometimes unsettling ideas: where does one draw the fine line between intelligent robot and human? Can man and robot form a balanced relationship? Can a robot's creator reliably predict its behavior based upon its programming? Can logic alone be used to determine what is best for humanity?

"I, Robot" was published in 1950 and includes stories written in the 1940's, when general-purpose electronic digital computers were still in their infancy.
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77 of 84 people found the following review helpful
Format:Mass Market Paperback
This is a collection of nine classic short stories about robots, each of which appeared previously in a pulp SF magazine. The stories contain Asimov's famous three "laws" of robotics as well as the positronic brain (consisting of a platinum/iridium sponge), now quite familiar with "Star Trek" fans. All of these have been great influences in both science and science fiction: 1) A robot may not injure a human being or, through inaction, allow a human being to come to harm; 2) A robot must obey the orders given it by human beings, except where such orders would conflict with the First Law; and 3) A robot must protect its own existence, as long as such protection does not conflict with the First and Second Laws. It should also be noted that Asimov coined the word "robotics" in these stories, a term very common today. I really enjoyed these when I first read them as a teenager (my father had introduced me to Asimov's works). And, now rereading them many years later, I can understand why I enjoyed them. They are straight-forward science fiction in which a problem is presented and a solution posed. The first story, "Robbie," first appeared in 1940 (when Asimov 20 years old) in a slightly different form as "Strange Playfellow." Robbie is a companion robot for a child and the child's mother is apprehensive in allowing her daughter to play with it. "Runaround" (1942) is a story concerning a problem encountered by two trouble-shooters on a mining operation on the surface of Mercury. A robot has been given orders to retrieve some ore yet keeps walking in circles, to the detriment of the two human workers. They come to the conclusion that the problem lies with the three Laws and they have to find a solution. Read more ›
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83 of 92 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Robots must follow the rules... July 10, 2004
Format:Mass Market Paperback|Verified Purchase
Re-reading "I, Robot" before the movie comes out was a good idea, I'm glad I did. For me, reading Asimov if often a fond trip down memory lane.
But if you have never read Asimov or looking for somewhere to start, I would highly recommend "I, Robot" as a first glimpse into Asimov's world(s). Here is a wonderful and timeless collection of nine short stories that all center around a central theme; The Three Laws Of Robotics.
The three laws are: 1) A robot may not injure a human being or through inaction allow a human being to come to harm. 2) A robot must obey orders given it by human beings except where such orders would conflict with the First Law. 3) A robot must protect its own existence as long as such protection does not conflict with the First or Second Law.
These laws are the central theme to each individual story, and connecting them is a running "Runaround", "Reason", and "Catch That Rabbit". Always under the direst of circumstances, they must figure out the malfunction of the robot before something terrible happens. Very entertaining stories.
Some of the other stories are about Dr. Calvin's personal experiences, such as "Liar" and "Little Lost Robot", but all fall back onto the laws as their basic theme, and whether or not humans will ever accept robots among them.
Once finished with "I, Robot", I very highly recommend the "Foundation" series, one of my favorite Asimov themes, along with the Robot Trilogy and another favorite, "Nightfall". Asimov has the gift of creating lively, likeable characters with a technical backdrop to his all-to-human stories, and always infuses a bit of humor into them.
Truly one of the great masters of Sci-Fi, Asimov is a must-read in my opinion, and "I, Robot" is a wonderful starting point.
Enjoy!
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Most Recent Customer Reviews
3.0 out of 5 stars Modern Scifi Owes a Debt to Asimov
I, Robot. Is there a selection from the golden age of science fiction that better epitomizes the era? Read more
Published 5 days ago by Daniel Burton
5.0 out of 5 stars Five Stars
As advertised
Published 18 days ago by Richard Armstrong
3.0 out of 5 stars Dog is man's friend . They say...
To review Asimov's I robot - ? from what point of View? Capek and his R.U.R. would say that it is literary pulp - nothing. Read more
Published 20 days ago by Zdenek Hanzlik
5.0 out of 5 stars great read! the story telling style kept me riveted to the book.
I was sucked into the story wanting more. loved the interview style telling of the story. onto the next book.
Published 29 days ago by Julie
5.0 out of 5 stars Read it to my sons and they loved it
This was the first Asimov book for my sons, age 11 and 8. They loved it and want me to read more! We read it as bed time stories over several nights and they really got involved... Read more
Published 1 month ago by stephanie z mo
4.0 out of 5 stars Four Stars
book was in good shape
Published 1 month ago by Ben
5.0 out of 5 stars Five Stars
I like Asimov books.
Published 1 month ago by Randall A. Hillman
5.0 out of 5 stars Five Stars
Asimov is awesome as usual
Published 1 month ago by Mary O
3.0 out of 5 stars What a fun read! This one has been on my to ...
There are three basic laws to Robotics:
1) A robot may not injure a human being or, through its inaction, allow a human being to come to harm. Read more
Published 1 month ago by Jamie W.
3.0 out of 5 stars Worth reading once, a canonical sci-fi novel and an easy read
This collection of short stories, edited together to form a coherent novel, is overrated. While Asimov is always an enjoyable read for a sci-fi fan, and this book was still... Read more
Published 2 months ago by SemioticLabyrinth
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i, Robot
Essentially a collection of stories tracing humankind's future with the development of robots. "I, Robot" begins by introducing the earliest robots, who cannot yet speak but already hold enough superhuman abilities to earn them the distrust of many humans. Also in the very first pages,... Read More
May 13, 2006 by Gary S |  See all 2 posts
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The name Amazon.com was chosen because the Amazon River is the largest river in the world, and so the name suggests large size, and also in part because it starts with 'A' and therefore would show up near the beginning of alphabetical lists.
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