I Shall Wear Midnight (Discworld Book 38) and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Qty:1
  • List Price: $16.99
  • Save: $3.89 (23%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
In Stock.
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: Solid used copy with visible wear. FREE SHIPPING w/AMAZON PRIME!
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 2 images

I Shall Wear Midnight (Discworld) Hardcover – September 28, 2010


See all 24 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Hardcover
"Please retry"
$13.10
$5.10 $0.01
Best%20Books%20of%202014


Frequently Bought Together

I Shall Wear Midnight (Discworld) + A Hat Full of Sky
Price for both: $27.36

Buy the selected items together
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Hero Quick Promo
Year-End Kindle Daily Deals
Load your library with great books for $2.99 or less each, today only. Learn more

Product Details

  • Series: Discworld
  • Hardcover: 368 pages
  • Publisher: HarperCollins (September 28, 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0061433047
  • ISBN-13: 978-0061433047
  • Product Dimensions: 6 x 1.2 x 9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.2 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (271 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #152,033 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From School Library Journal

Gr 7 Up–This is the final adventure of the young witch, Tiffany Aching, and her obnoxious, fawning, and yet lovable small blue companions, the Nac Mac Feegles. In many ways it's a coming-of-age novel, as Tiffany is now on her own. Known as “The Hag O'the Hills,” she spends her time tending to the messy, menial, everyday things that no one else will take care of, such as fixing bones or easing the pain of a dying man. But as she tries to serve the people of the Chalk hills, she senses a growing distrust of her, and a loss of respect for witches in general. Along with the Nac Mac Feegles, she has to seek out the source of this growing fear. Tiffany discovers she may have been responsible for waking an evil force when she kissed the winter in Wintersmith (HarperTempest, 2006). The Cunning Man is in need of a host body and is searching for Tiffany. Pratchett combines gut-busting humor and amusing footnotes with a genuine poignancy as Tiffany tries to decide what her future should be. Fans of the author's “Discworld” (HarperCollins) books will enjoy the connections with the larger series, particularly the inclusion of Granny Weatherwax. Simply put, this fourth and final book in the series is an undisputed triumph.–Tim Wadham, St. Louis County Library, MOα(c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

From Booklist

Pratchett returns to the terra firma of his popular, sprawling Discworld series, the young-reader corner of which centers around teen witch Tiffany Aching. Being a good witch mostly means tending to the locals’ minor aches, pains, and kerfuffles—which she does with as much aplomb as anyone could be expected to muster—but to become a great witch, she’ll have to contend with the malevolent ghost of an ancient witch-burner. Yet even that might not be as terrifying as trying to keep the peace between the humans and the wee Nac Mac Feegles (whose primary skills are drinking, brawling, having Scottish brogues, brawling a bit more, and stealing every scene they’re in) and, shudder, getting wrapped up in the wedding of her childhood friend, who is suddenly a very myopic baron. The action never picks up much more momentum than a determined amble, but readers won’t care a whit because in terms of pure humor per square word, Pratchett may be the cheeriest writer around. Now that Tiffany Aching’s adventures are concluded, readers can explore the nearly three decade’s worth of other Discworld books. Grades 8-12. --Ian Chipman

More About the Author

Terry Pratchett sold his first story when he was fifteen, which earned him enough money to buy a second-hand typewriter. His first novel, a humorous fantasy entitled The Carpet People, appeared in 1971 from the publisher Colin Smythe. Terry worked for many years as a journalist and press officer, writing in his spare time and publishing a number of novels, including his first Discworld novel, The Color of Magic, in 1983. In 1987 he turned to writing full time, and has not looked back since. To date there are a total of 36 books in the Discworld series, of which four (so far) are written for children. The first of these children's books, The Amazing Maurice and His Educated Rodents, won the Carnegie Medal. A non-Discworld book, Good Omens, his 1990 collaboration with Neil Gaiman, has been a longtime bestseller, and was reissued in hardcover by William Morrow in early 2006 (it is also available as a mass market paperback (Harper Torch, 2006) and trade paperback (Harper Paperbacks, 2006). Terry's latest book, Nation, a non-Discworld standalone YA novel was published in October of 2008 and was an instant New York Times and London Times bestseller. Regarded as one of the most significant contemporary English-language satirists, Pratchett has won numerous literary awards, was named an Officer of the British Empire "for services to literature" in 1998, and has received four honorary doctorates from the Universities of Warwick, Portsmouth, Bath, and Bristol. His acclaimed novels have sold more than 55 million copies (give or take a few million) and have been translated into 36 languages. Terry Pratchett lives in England with his family, and spends too much time at his word processor.  Some of Terry's accolades include: The Carnegie Medal, Locus Awards, the Mythopoetic Award, ALA Notable Books for Children, ALA Best Books for Young Adults, Book Sense 76 Pick, Prometheus Award and the British Fantasy Award.

Customer Reviews

Another wonderful story from the amazing Terry Pratchett!
Moses' Granny
I know this isn't much of a review for this particular book, but... You just have to read it.
Jeannie Blankenship
Another wonderful tale of the Discworld,Tiffany Aching and the Wee Free Men by Sir Terry.
miss fishhooks

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

83 of 85 people found the following review helpful By E. M. Van Court VINE VOICE on September 29, 2010
Format: Hardcover
Tiffany Aching is facing an insidious evil; "poison goes where poison is welcome". Not a literal poison, but a poison of souls that causes the people who need witches to question, misinterpret, and attack people like Tiffany. Tiffany spends her days helping people, she goes to "feed them as is hungry, clothe them as is naked, and speak up for them as has no voices". What comes for her is blind and hateful.

To add to this, the Baron is dying, his son is under the spell of someone other than Tiffany, Tiffany has to face the bane of witches throughout the ages, the other witches are watching and judging her, and, worst luck, the Nac Mac Feegle are ready help her again. Along the way, she meets the genius behind Boffo, a skeleton that is much happier with a teddy bear than without, a young woman with a unique gift for languages, and Roland's (the son of the dying baron) fiancée and her mother, the Duchess.

Dark, with humorous highlights. Sir Terry Pratchett addresses the worst aspect of the human soul; petty and willfully ignorant hatred for those to whom you are indebted. Someone spends their days healing and giving to others, so, of course, the human reaction is sullen rage and resentment. At the same time, the Nac Mac Feegle are in fine form. Jeannie, the Kelda of the Wee Free Men is growing into her role as their matriarch (and mother to most) of the clan. Rob Anybody has apparently mastered the hiddlins (secrets) of the explaining, the heart of being husband to the Kelda, but truly lets forth his rage before the tale is told. And of course, there is always Daft Willie and his pal, Horace the cheese.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
40 of 41 people found the following review helpful By Amazon Customer on September 3, 2010
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
An absolutely beautiful book. It actually brought me to tears on three separate occasions (I will admit to being a bit of a sap)

I have been reading Terry Pratchett's books for 16 years since I first discovered 'Sourcery' in my high school library and then went back and caught up with the others and I truly believe this is his best. At least, it resonated the most with me.

Considering at the point he wrote it his Alzheimer's had reached the point where he could no longer type but needs to dictate his words, this is an incredible achievement. The man is still sharp as a whip and an incredible storywriter to boot.

I haven't loved one of his books this much since I read 'Maskerade' and I loved that book an awful lot.. as I did 'Witches Abroad' so maybe I'm just partial to the witch related stories? Nevertheless if you are a fan, you owe it to yourself to read this. After reading the previous three Tiffany Aching books of course as they all tie in together.

Once again, I love this book and it has made my top ten of favourite books ever.

As far as the Kindle edition goes, it was just fine. Formatting was great, easy to read, all the illustrations translated quite nicely and only one spelling mistake.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
40 of 42 people found the following review helpful By T. Simons VINE VOICE on September 29, 2010
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
This is the latest entry in Pratchett's four-book sub-series about a young witch, Tiffany Aching, as she grows up and learns, appropriately enough for her trade, to be a wise woman. (There are upwards of thirty or forty "Discworld" books total, which cluster into subgroups around individual characters). While you could certainly start here if you wanted to, new readers might find it more rewarding to begin with The Wee Free Men, the first in Tiffany's sub-series, followed by A Hat Full of Sky and then Wintersmith, before proceeding to this one.

This is billed as a children's / young adult book, although little sets it apart from Pratchett's other fantasy except for some (very) slight bowdlerizations; primarily, this is a young adult book because the heroine is a young adult, and it deals with issues that young adults have to deal with. Like the Harry Potter books, the content and tone of the Tiffany series have been maturing ever so slightly with each book to match the advancing maturity of the protagonist, and while this one's still suitable for younger readers, it definitely contains a few jokes likely to fly over their heads (at least unless some other source has educated them). Tiffany herself is portrayed as very mature for her age - a portrayal deliberate on Pratchett's part, I believe, as Tiffany is exactly as mature as most people that age tend to think they are, and almost as mature as she herself wants to be.
Read more ›
2 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
59 of 67 people found the following review helpful By E. A Solinas HALL OF FAMETOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on September 28, 2010
Format: Hardcover
Tiffany Aching is the witch of Chalk, which means that she has to do all the messy rural stuff that witches do. But witches aren't always as appreciated as they should be, and Terry Pratchett's "I Shall Wear Midnight" flings the sensible young girl -- and the Nac Mac Feegles -- against a threat that really, really doesn't like witches.

Tiffany is doing the usual witchy rounds in Chalk -- nursing the sick, burying the dead, watching cheese races, and rescuing the occasional girl from an abusive father. Then the local Duke expires after a long illness, and it's up to Tiffany to tell his son Roland and his "watercolour-painting wife-to-be" about what happened.

The problem is, she's being stalked by a creepy eyeless man with a vile psychic stench, who is inspiring people to hate and distrust witches. Suddenly stones are being thrown, accusations are being made, and Tiffany even finds herself in the Ankh-Morpork jail. And if Tiffany doesn't find a way to stop the Cunning Man, things will get very toasty for the witches...

Due to having Alzheimer's disease, Terry Pratchett had to dictate "I Shall Wear Midnight" instead of the usual computer typing. As a result, the book's beginning is very rambly and scattered, as if Pratchett hadn't fully thought out how the plot was going to go -- but after the Duke's death, things start to tighten up and move faster.

And Pratchett hasn't lost any of his delicious wit, whether it's poking fun at cliches (the cackle box!) or sharp dialogue ("Have you boys got no shame?
Read more ›
9 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews


What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?