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I Was a Teenage Werewolf [VHS]


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Product Details

  • Actors: Michael Landon, Yvonne Lime, Whit Bissell, Tony Marshall, Dawn Richard
  • Directors: Gene Fowler Jr.
  • Format: NTSC
  • Rated: Unrated
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (26 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B00000F7RU
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #75,053 in Movies & TV (See Top 100 in Movies & TV)

Editorial Reviews

A troubled teenager seeks help through hypnotherapy, but his evil doctor uses him for regression experiments that transform him into a rampaging werewolf.

Customer Reviews

Does this sound like something that isn't possible ?
Jeff Marzano
It is this very novel manner of Tony's de-evolution that adds to the film's eerieness.
Martin Asiner
Its' a classic and one of the best werewolf films ever made.
Richard P. Whitney

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

21 of 22 people found the following review helpful By Martin Asiner on August 5, 2003
Format: VHS Tape
I WAS A TEENAGE WEREWOLF is one of the finest terrible movies ever made. At the time of its release (1957), it was exactly right for the drive in circuit, where teenagers could see on the big screen the angst of teenage turmoil that was afflicting them. Even today, for the newest generation of hardened gangsta teens, this film still elicits creepy undertows of fear and self-loathing normally found today in rap videos.
IWTW was a first for director Gene Fowler and Michael Landon. Landon, who later shot to fame in BONANZA and LITTLE HOUSE ON THE PRAIRIE, here shows the star power that even then made him stand out in a crowd of overacting teens. This film is no satire, nor is tongue in cheek. And surprisingly neither is it drenched in gore or special effects that today passes for directorial talent. It is instead, a hearkening back to a previous generation of filmmakers who believed that real terror must come slowly and the payoff of the terror scene should include a masterful blending of chilling music, decent acting, and creative camera work, all of which harmoniously lead up to the screen violence. In IWTW, the screen violence is limited to only two scenes, but the screen spookiness stands out from the first reel to the last.
In most werewolf films, the victim must be first bitten by one, as Lon Chaney was. Here, Landon is rebellious teenager, Tony, who is constantly fighting his peers, his authority figures, and anyone else in his path. His screen agida brings to mind Brando in THE WILD ONE when Brando is asked, "Why are you so angry?' Brando's reply: "What do you got?" Tony is an uncycled Brando who is forced to attend counseling with a psychiatrist Dr. Brandon (Whit Bissell).
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13 of 13 people found the following review helpful By Richard P. Whitney on September 25, 2004
Format: VHS Tape
Believe it or not, this film has perhaps the most terrifying werewolf "kill" ever recorded on film.

The first victim, walking alone at night through the woods, is stalked and stalked and well, you can guess the rest. Sounds like a million other werewolf movie scenes- well, its' not. There is no blood, nor any gore,- just incredibly intense, realistic, and frightening movie-making. The palpable fear that most viewers experience viewing this particular scene is due to the fact that it ingeniously connects to the universal experience most of us have had, of walking home alone in the dark, and "hearing something" in front or behind us. The first victim is a guy, unusual for 1950s fare, - but like "Jaws", shot almost 20 years later, this first "killing" would create a feeling of dread the viewer would feel throughout the rest of the film.

There are so many great moments contained within this film for any horror movie fan to enjoy, that despite a rather annoying "musical number", (something all teenage films at the time seemed to contain), missing it would be a shame.

The ending is a doozy. Its' all very well done- great acting, great transformation scenes, all told, its' a cleverly crafted piece of film-making indeed.

From Michael Landon's moving performance as a troubled teenage boy, doomed, thanks to the madness of a trusted doctor, to the horrifying original werewolf make-up, you will not sleep through this film, believe me. It will both touch and frighten even the most tested of horror film fans. If you have not seen it, I'm surprised. Its' a classic and one of the best werewolf films ever made.

It also set into motion the "teenage monster film cycle" of the 1950s. Incredibly, in less than a year from it's release, "I Was A Teenage Werewolf" grossed more than ten times it's cost!

You'll see why. I dare you to watch it alone some moon-lit night. I DARE YOU!
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11 of 11 people found the following review helpful By Samanatha on November 21, 2010
Format: DVD
This is a great classic for all the Michael Landon fans out there. Can hardly wait until it is on DVD.

It is an easy sell
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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Robert S. Clay Jr. on March 8, 2002
Format: VHS Tape
This is the legendary cult classic that sounds worse than it really is. A very young Michael Landon plays tormented teenager, Tony Rivers. Little Joe, er, Tony displays violent rages at school. At home, he does strange things as wolfing down raw hamburger. After a fistfight at school, a police officer refers Tony to Dr. Brandon (the ever present Whit Bissell) for hypnotherapy. Because of Tony's violent behavior, Brandon decides to use him as a subject in his research of human evolution. Brandon puts Tony in touch with savage roots. After drug injections and hypnosis, Pa Ingalls, er, Tony grows fangs and fur. The '50s look of this movie makes it a beguiling antique. Notice the clothes, the music, the dancing, and the refreshments at the kids' Halloween party. In addition, the preaching and the posturing of the parents and the high school principal is strictly square. One almost expects Ward and June to appear. Despite its low-budget origins, this is an entertaining horror flick that avoids excessive camp humor. It is a solid variation of the good vs. evil dilemma. There isn't any of the full moon and silver bullet cliches. This werewolf appears when anger rages in the dark realms of the soul. Guy Williams has a small role as a cop... Fun for genre fans. ;-)
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10 of 11 people found the following review helpful By Simon Davis on December 3, 2002
Format: VHS Tape
One of the standout horror offerings of the 1950's "I Was A Teenage Werewolf" will unfortunately be forever lumped into the pop corn, drive-in circuit, mentality mainly because of its dated and exploitative title. In reality it is a most interesting film, a very worthy entry in the werewolf cycle of films and contains good writing, polished acting, acceptable makeup and some interesting camerawork.
Chiefly remembered today as Michael Landon's first big role which led into his long television career on "Bonanza", "Little House On The Prairie", and "Highway To Heaven" it contains an intense performance as Landon plays Tony Rivers a hot headed young school boy who is drifting into a life of potential juvenile delinquency. He is involved in school fights, loses his temper at the slightest provocation, and is prone to odd behaviour like eating raw meat from the refrigerator. Directed by the police to see if these problems cannot be addressed before he ends up in Juvenile Hall Tony consults Dr Brandon (Whit Bissell) an expert in hypnotherapy who carries his research too far and begins to use Tony for his illegal experiments in human development. Unknowingly he unleashes a force in Tony which turns him into a werewolf with tragic consequences.
Despite its 50's origins and limited budget this film stands up very well indeed. Philip Scheer's makeup for the werewolf transformation scenes is excellent for its kind and creates a scary realistic effect. Directed with energy by first time director Gene Fowler who by vocation was a film editor, it keeps a fast pace going and delays just the right amount of time in revealing Landon's werewolf in all its ferocious anger.
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