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197 of 203 people found the following review helpful
on March 17, 2011
This little meter is outstanding! I own a Fluke DMM 179 and of course that meter is top of the line. But would you believe this Equus 3320 is 99% spot on with it's readings when compared to a recently calibrated Fluke 179!! I compared measurements with the Equus 3320 and the Fluke 179, in AC Voltage, DC Voltage, Resistance, and DC voltage for the Equus in the Battery test modes. It had literally almost identical readings to the Fluke! The circuit board appears to use mostly prime spec electrical components, so I suspect it will remain accurate for a long time as long as it's not abused.

This meter sells on Amazon for less than $20, and has auto ranging. This means instead of having to dial in the max value manually the meter figures out what DCV range to use (if you were measuring DC voltage for example). It's the same deal for other measurements like resistance, AC Voltage, etc, just set to that measurement type and the meter figures out the correct max range. Most auto ranging meters below $99 have slow auto ranging acquisition speed (this is the time it takes for the meter to figure out what range to use). Many of the cheaper auto ranging meters take several seconds to figure out the correct range and then display the measurement. Not the $19 Equus 3320, it was just as fast as the Fluke 179, which is a second or less in the voltage measurements, and under 2 seconds for resistance (resistance auto ranging takes slightly longer on all meters because the meter must send a small amount of current across the device under test first before trying to acquire the range).

The battery test function (which my Fluke 179 does not have) is the main reason I purchased this meter. The battery test goes beyond just measuring the voltage of the battery any cheap meter can do that all day long. The battery test function in the 3320 puts the battery under a current load (10 Milli amps for both 1.5v and 9v batteries) and then measures the voltage. This gives you a much better idea of if the battery is really good or not and will really perform in your devices. Some batteries on a bare voltage test show good voltage, but that good voltage will quickly drop to unusable levels once the battery is put under load. So testing batteries with a meter that has a battery test function is far superior to just checking it's voltage. This feature alone makes the $19 price for this meter well worth it!

As a few other reviewers have said, it can only measure 200 Milli Amps of current in AC (whereas DC can measure up to 10 Amps). Most other multimeters can measure 10 amps of DC or AC current. So if you are looking to measure any substantial AC current this is the wrong meter. In fact for any current measurements I recommend a current clamp like the ExTech 623 or ExTech 380942 since you can clamp right over a live insulated wire (while the circuit is operating) and take your measurement. With any standard multimeter (like the 3320) you have to wire it in line with the circuit first (with the circuit powered off) and then you can take your measurement. But if you are looking for a compact, accurate multimeter for your garage or home (where you will not need AC current measurements) then look no further you cannot beat the accuracy, auto ranging speed, and the price of the Equus 3320.
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73 of 73 people found the following review helpful
on July 3, 2013
Let's start by realizing this is a low cost meter. It has some nice features but also some short comings.
I like the size and shape. The display is very easy to read and the battery meter works nicely even with NiMH AA batteries. The probe storage is also nice.
The resistance auto ranging is reasonably quick. If you ever have to measure a series of say under 100 ohm resistors or tweak a variable resistor with a low resistance value the longer delay of some auto ranging meters can really be quite frustrating. While the wrist strap seems like a bit of a gimmick, I can actually see it being quite useful.

That said the meter has a number of flaws.
-I don't like that it doesn't have a battery door. You have to unscrew the back case to replace the batteries. The case is held in with self tapping plastic screws. It you aren't careful those self tapping screws will strip out the screw holes in short order.
-The leads are rather cheap feeling. They aren't as lousy as the $3 meters but they aren't as good as I've seen on other $20-30 meters. They have rather dull tips and the surface resistance seems rather high. Cleaning with alcohol would probably help.
-The continuity test is slow to trigger. Like the need to check resistance quickly, if you are checking say a number of wires for a good connection, it's frustrating to wait for the check delay to complete. In defense of the meter, this is slow even on some meters costing $100 or more. This one is also latched so it gives a solid beep once it sees continuity. Some meters sound very scratchy when checking continuity.

Safety concerns.
Let's be honest, this is a cheap meter that should never be used on anything more than a standard household wall outlet. The meter's internal safety circuits are totally inadequate for reading things like household mains or high power lines such as a dryer or stove might use. Then again most home users would never use it for those jobs anyway. The CAT II rating is questionable given the lack of any fuse on the 10A line.
-The meter uses only 3 inputs and the mA ranges are shared with the standard inputs. It's possible that while changing ranges you could accidentally switch into a current range while applying voltage to the meter. That would blow the fuse. The fuse is not a high power type but if you don't measure higher power lines that shouldn't be an issue.
--I really dislike that the 10A range isn't fused. Exceeding 10A can cause the wires to get very hot. Putting the leads into a wall outlet when on the 10A range could cause a dangerous electrical spark as you would be effectively short circuiting the wall outlet. You could also hurt yourself when taking amp readings in a car. The 12V car battery can easily deliver far more than 10A causing the probe wires to get dangerously hot. Even a cheap fuse would be better than no fuse in this case.

!!!The illustration on the back of the packaging shows a disaster waiting to happen!!!
Seriously, they show someone trying to take a voltage reading from an AC wall outlet. The range is set for volts but the leads are plugged into the unfused 10A inputs. Had the outlet been live they would have hurt themselves while photographing the pictures for the packaging! If the last measurement you took was amps and you forgot to move the leads back to the other input a voltage reading could damage your device or even worse, YOU!

So my big issue is safety due to the unfused 10A input. This is not a flaw unique to this cheap meter but it's something to keep in mind. Over all I wouldn't say don't buy it but if you are really going to measure things using the 10A range, get a meter with a fused 10A range.
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133 of 145 people found the following review helpful
on November 16, 2007
This is a good little meter.

Thumb uppers: Small overall size, large LCD display, auto-ranging, uses 2 AA batteries, uses standard sized banana plugs so is compatible with several 3rd party or customized probes/connectors.

Thumb downers: probe clips are such weak, soft rubber that they don't grip the probes securely. And it would be nice for a little more $$ to include a case. So instead buy a $3 camera case to solve both deficiencies. Too bad the over-sized instruction booklet isn't the same size as the meter so it can be stored in the same case.
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301 of 335 people found the following review helpful
on January 25, 2008
This is a meter of above average quality for the price. A great meter to have for the do it your-selfer for around the house, car or boat. However, one function that is lacking is high range AC current (amps) the description says it measures AC current but doesn't say that the max AC amps it can test is 200mA or .2 amps, not really practical for ANY AC current measurments. You can measure the current of say a 20 watt AC light bulb with this meter. The PC you are using to read this draws about 3.5-4 AMPS or about 3500-4000 milli amps, this meter maxes out at 200 ma.

I bought it for AC amps but can't use it for that. I'll keep it as a back up meter but I have to buy a better meter for AC amps. I guess that's what I get for being a cheap skate... time to buy a Fluke!
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69 of 75 people found the following review helpful
on June 5, 2008
I use expensive fluke DMMs all of the time at work and was going to buy one for home use when my Sears DMM (that was pretty much a piece of junk, couldn't auto range, and eventually wouldn't shutoff) started annoying me. So, I chose a $129 Fluke meter then happened upon this meter. I figured what the heck for $25 and decided to order it. If you need a home meter that AUTORANGES (this is a big deal) and works, you really can't go wrong with this product. The autoranging is great, VDC, VAC, & continuity have tested fine thus far and I think the leads are like any other DMM I have used. This is a killer deal for $25.00.
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26 of 27 people found the following review helpful
VINE VOICEon November 22, 2012
Pro
Takes 2 AA batteries (included)
Fold out stand locks closed, but unfortunately swings freely when open
Rubber bumpers provide some protection, although less give than expected
Elastic strap on rear allows the meter to be held on the back of a hand
Test leads are very flexible
Auto-off after 15 min idle
Auto ranging takes about 1-2 seconds to lock on correct range
Small and compact (139mm x 89mm x 32mm), 6.3 oz (180g)
Battery test with load shows lighted LED and actual voltage (most multi-meters cannot test batteries because accurate testing requires an applied load). Test load is 10mA for 1.5 and 9 volt batteries, 100mA for 6 volt batteries, 200mA for 12 volt batteries.

Con
Cannot lock in a specific range (auto range cannot be disabled)
Display does not have a back-light
Clips on side of meter for test leads do not hold probes securely (but better than nothing)
No case
review image
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72 of 83 people found the following review helpful
on June 26, 2007
Excellent unit, better than any prosumer meter available at Radio Shack. The built-in stand is great. Display size great. Meter leads with included protective removable tip covers great. Battery condition indicator LED great. Do not pass on this unit!
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50 of 57 people found the following review helpful
on June 2, 2008
Equus 3320 Auto-Ranging Digital Multimeter I own several other digital meters. This one is best, just ordered 2 more. Auto off and AA batteries! Leaving a normal DVM on will kill the costly 9V battery! Its own novel battery testing is fast and easy with LEDs. AC 200mA range used with a shunt(say 1 or 0.1 Ohm precision) can give you higher AC current range! No AC current at all on others. Even has a wriststrap on the back. Much larger digits and autoranging works super. Readings are not ambiguous. My Velleman only reads to 2 MegOhms - Equus 20M. Equus has four ACV ranges vice two for others. Lacks a backlight, hold and transistor gain (hFE) - features I seldom use, anyway. Buy one!
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40 of 45 people found the following review helpful
on September 6, 2007
I received the Equus multimeter about a month ago. I've used it very frequently at home checking batteries, home appliances etc.. My conclusion is that the Equus Multimeter is worth every penny I paid for it. It is shock resistant, (I dropped it from a 4' stand and nothing happened to it). Is accurate, the auto power off feature is very useful. You don't need any more for home use.
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37 of 42 people found the following review helpful
on April 26, 2008
I have purchased this item to check the voltage of my car battery. It works well indicating a right voltage value. It seems, however, first a little bit complicate for me to use; I need to know where I put two pins' outlets among three holes and which dial position is relevant to my case. I just followed the manual attached, which describes how the multimeter can be used in case of checking a car battery. So I did not have any problem.

Just to remind you, one important thing for using the multimeter is that you should always connect a red point first to the equipment to check, then black. When you detach, disconnect black first, then the red point. This will give the multimemter a longer life.

Thank you for the business,
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