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Ice Cream Everyday

October 22, 2013

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Product Details

  • Original Release Date: October 22, 2013
  • Label: blisslife
  • Copyright: 2013 Blisslife Records
  • Total Length: 1:08:06
  • Genres:
  • ASIN: B00G4M9L1C
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (54 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #15,247 Paid in Albums (See Top 100 Paid in Albums)

Customer Reviews

If you are a fan of good music please buy this cd.
PAW/M
It's unfortunate that her music is not more mainstream, she is truly talented person with a beautiful and powerful voice.
Amazon Customer
I am a dedicated fan, so I will always buy, always listen.
Cee

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

29 of 29 people found the following review helpful By Jason S. Stokar on October 26, 2013
Format: MP3 Music
Talk about a long-awaited, highly anticipated album: I believe I first heard about Ice Cream Everyday around 2009, which means it comes in second to Missy Elliot's "Block Party" in the 'when-will-this-record-finally-surface?' race.

The good news is that it's truly an exceptional album. The music is not a departure from Amel's signature style, which has been mislabeled as neo-soul by critics trying to place her in a box. However, unlike the contemporaries to which she is often compared, Amel's instrumentation is prominently digital and her vocals are gentle while retaining emotion - almost like a female Jeff Buckley. The music is funky, it's jazzy, it's rhythm & bluesy, it's avant-garde, it's unique.

While each melody and recording is both catchy and beautiful, as a package, they are diverse. Songs like "Urrr the Shh"' and "Orange Flow" have her dropping hooks on hot, organic beats, whereas tracks like "Danger" and Soon" enable her voice to float freely without strictly abiding by a repetitive melodic structure. The base of "Danger" is the Harp, an instrument not heard often in popular music today.

The strongest component of the record, as with her previous releases, is her lyrics. They are personal, sincere, spiritual and poetic. If you are a fan of her older songs like "Make Me Whole" and "For Real", you will quickly be obsessed with "I Do Take" and "Don't Let me Down" on this release. There is no doubt Amel is in love with her husband (who has been collaborating with her since her Groove Theory days) and her daughters. Her lyrics demonstrate that she is overwhelmed with the love she feels on a daily basis.

And sometimes, it's just so refreshing to hear an album about true love than about heartbreak...
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12 of 12 people found the following review helpful By Bliss4Lyfe on November 3, 2013
Format: MP3 Music Verified Purchase
Amel has never let me down. One of the best of our time with a soulful and upbeat R&B sound. The mainstream can't handle knowing that music that doesn't glorify sex or heartbreak can be so wonderful.
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11 of 11 people found the following review helpful By K. Grandison on November 11, 2013
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
Her lyrical content is decent, yet refreshing on the ears. I even liked the fact that she allowed one of her daughters to have great contribution *instrument wise* on this album. Her daughter, Sky plays the bass, piano and sings through out the album and is a very great mixer. Otherwise, this album is worth your every penny and even though I have the digital copy, I'm getting the physical copy as well on here which I'm glad they are letting Amazon ship their cds in their behalf.
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Perverted Alchemist on December 25, 2013
Format: Audio CD
Singer/songwriter Amel Larrieux initially made her debut as one-half of Groove Theory. She created the group with rapper turned producer Bryce Wilson- a former member of the electro hip hop group Mantronix. From there, they recorded their lone self-titled debut for Epic Records. Shortly after the release of the album, Wilson and Larrieux fought over the group's direction. As a result, they parted ways in the middle of recording what would have been their sophomore album. While Bryce went looking for a replacement, Amel soldiered on with a solo career- releasing "Infinite Possibilities" in 2000. The album was critically acclaimed, but it wasn't as commercial as Epic would have liked. So Amel went independent on her sophomore effort- 2003's "Bravebird", which yielded her biggest hit "For Real". She returned in 2006 with the underrated "Morning" and the long talked about jazz covers record "Lovely Standards" the following year.

After a six year absence, Amel returned in 2013 with "Ice Cream Everyday". Much like her studio albums in the past, her newest recording was produced by her husband Laru Larrieux. It's a noticeable change for Amel, as she incorporates live instrumentation into her electronica styled R&B. She also made what has to be the lengthiest album in her recorded history at sixteen songs. She leads the album with "Afraid", followed by the percussive, piano driven "A Million Sapphires". Much like her previous ballad "Make Me Whole", the track "I Do Take" is a potential wedding song. She deals with being friend-zoned from a woman's perspective on "You Don't See Me", while getting sensual on the industrial ballad "Berries & Cream". She warns of a suspicious character on "Danger", and explores the negative power of words on "Moment To Reflect".
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Cee on October 30, 2013
Format: MP3 Music Verified Purchase
I am a dedicated fan, so I will always buy, always listen. Not to criticize, I'll simply suggest: On this collection, I would have liked it better if Larrieux had let loose, let us hear on ALL tracks her ability to reach and transcend.
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9 of 10 people found the following review helpful By K on November 4, 2013
Format: MP3 Music Verified Purchase
I have to admit that this album is undoubtedly in my opinion her best yet. Amel takes her creativity as an artist to a whole new level on this album. Her experimentation with music styles and poetry through her lyrics becomes evident as one listens and it does not dis-appoint. This has been added to my daily listening collection as I find this album just like the rest..pleasantly addictive:)
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Erica Watkins on November 15, 2013
Format: MP3 Music Verified Purchase
It is a wonderful, long anticipated album, which is true to Amel Larrieux's style. It was well worth the wait!
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Charlie B. on November 26, 2013
Format: Audio CD
This album reminds me in many ways of Amel's 2004 release, "Bravebird": edgy, funky, eclectic, ahead of its time. To me, it feels like a departure from "Morning" and the covers album "Lovely Standards," the follow-ups were a little more pure and organic, and to my tastes, not as grabbing. But "Ice Cream Everyday" reconfirms musically that Amel is in a class all her own and remains one of the most interesting and notable neo-soul acts around.

The lead single and first cut on the album, "Afraid," is an innocuous groove about an intense obsession and desire for another while not knowing exactly what will be. I was immediately hooked when I heard this over summer; it was so hot the DJ spun it at least twice and everyone was on the floor. "A Million Sapphires" follows, and puts Amel back into her comfort zone with that ethereal and angelic sound that she is so known for. The beautiful and magnetic "I Do Take" warrants several listens, it's a beautiful song and I always think "wedding song" when I listen to it. It has a Prince-esque vibe in some of the rifts, just amazing. She turns it back up with "You Don't See Me," an almost infectious go-go track about wanting to be noticed by someone, is just as calming as its counterpart "Ur The Shhh." Lyrically, "Berries and Cream" is on point, and another groove that is similar to the lead single.

"Danger" is an eerie, gothic track with a serious message. Very haunting yet mesmerizing especially the way her voice just calls to you. "Moment to Reflect" and "See Where You Are" are a conscious track, while "Have You" finds Amel flirting possibly with adult pop and is another surprising, stand out track.
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