Sorry, this item is not available in
Image not available for
Color:
Image not available

To view this video download Flash Player

 
Sell Us Your Item
For up to a $1.00 Gift Card
Trade in
Have one to sell? Sell yours here

Ice People (2008)

Allan A. Ashworth , Adam R. Lewis , Anne Aghion  |  NR |  DVD
4.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (11 customer reviews)


Available from these sellers.


Watch Instantly with Rent Buy
Ice People (Institutional Use)   -- $390.00
Ice People (Home Use)   $4.99 $9.99

Other Formats & Versions

Amazon Price New from Used from
DVD [DVD] $24.95  
  1-Disc Version --  
Deal of the Week: 55% Off "Justice League: The Complete Series"
This week only, save 55% on "Justice League: The Complete Series". The series contains all 91 episodes as well as a 15th disc which includes a retrospective on the DC universe. The offer to own this series ends October 5, 2014, 11:59 pm PST. Shop now

Product Details

  • Actors: Allan A. Ashworth, Adam R. Lewis, Andrew Podoll, Kelly Gorz
  • Directors: Anne Aghion
  • Format: Color, NTSC, Widescreen
  • Language: English
  • Region: Region 1 (U.S. and Canada only. Read more about DVD formats.)
  • Aspect Ratio: 1.85:1
  • Number of discs: 1
  • Rated: NR (Not Rated)
  • Studio: Gacaca Productions
  • DVD Release Date: November 17, 2009
  • Run Time: 77 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (11 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B001LDI56G
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #475,648 in Movies & TV (See Top 100 in Movies & TV)

Special Features

None.

Editorial Reviews

Review

The ice in ICE PEOPLE is instantly compelling: endless white-on-white vistas, ethereal panoramas of cold. Culled from a four-month trip to Antarctica by the filmmaker Anne Aghion, this modest little documentary sets its lens on one of the most majestic and forbidding landscapes on the planet. The people of ICE PEOPLE take a while longer to come into focus. The movie, which runs a scant 77 minutes but feels four times as long, is so maddeningly slow to develop any sort of narrative shape that you begin to suspect Ms. Aghion of doodling. She is, as it turns out, a canny portraitist, and her patience in divulging the context of her project pays off as the movie sinks something of the feel (brr!) and routine of an Antarctic expedition into your bones. Her companions are a group of academic geologists sifting through rock in search of fossils, though to what end is not entirely clear. What is obvious is their tenacious, obsessive joy in work which, to the outside observer, simply looks like a bunch of grubby people unusually committed to sitting in dirt. The film's hesitation, lack of rhetorical inflation and commitment to humble observation generate a tough poetry. ICE PEOPLE sticks in the mind. --The New York Times

Rare is the film about Antarctica that does not concern itself with the playful antics of penguins, which is why this Anne Aghion documentary comes as such a welcome surprise. The polar opposite of Discovery Channel fare and a small-scale counterbalance to Werner Herzog's similar but subjective ENCOUNTERS AT THE END OF THE WORLD, Aghion's film follows four geologists on a quest in the mostly snowless McMurdo Dry Valleys to learn more about prehistoric Antarctica and its effect on global climate change. Majestically shot in HD over several months, ICE PEOPLE is as much a character study as it is a science lesson, both detailing the team s research they find indisputable proof of a once-green Antarctic and understanding the mind-set of those who willingly choose a day job at the end of the earth. There is little in the way of context or background information, with Aghion opting instead to let the explorers do the talking: It is lonely at the bottom, and the appearance of the camera is an opportunity for the subjects to discuss matters metaphysical (religion versus science), dermatological (the effects of not showering for extended periods) and unavoidable (those damned snotcicles). With its lack of narration and subjective distance, the film is a uniquely meditative, psychological portrait of individuals who approach scientific exploration with the passion and fervor of artists. --Time Out New York

Despite the success of THE MARCH OF THE PENGUINS, IMAX's ANTARCTICA and Werner Herzog's current Oscar nominee for best documentary, ENCOUNTERS AT THE END OF THE WORLD, Antarctica still seems like virgin territory on film. A new French-American co-production, ICE PEOPLE emphasizes the variety of potential responses to an isolated continent that's both grand and forbidding. Moody, atmospheric and often refreshingly down-to-earth, it's not quite like any previous film about Antarctica. The director, Anne Aghion, likes to fill the screen with the kinds of lonely landscapes that David Lean once used to suggest another kind of desert. She and her cinematographer, Sylvestre Guidi, are especially fond of pulling back their cameras and demonstrating the scale of the place and the relative puniness of the scientists who have gathered there for research. Laurent Petitgand's spare score, which relies mostly on a single guitar, contributes mightily to the impact of several montages. In this context, the sudden use of Microsoft's familiar musical cue, announcing that Windows is ready, sounds downright exotic. But the filmmakers also focus on things as mundane as a discussion of the dirt that becomes part of your skin when you haven't showered for days and snotsicles forming on your nose. The claustrophobic conditions of living together, with people you get to know almost too well, can turn familiarity into a trap. Politics, religion and the war in Iraq become subjects to be mentioned gingerly. It's better to focus on science and the challenges that brought the team to this place, which they hope will shed light on what happened there millions of years ago. Whether they're examining fossils and ash layers, or they're wondering about the best spot to witness the eruption of Mount Erebus (which isn't expected to happen for a very long time), they're obsessed with the challenge of finding out just how Antarctica works. Aghion, who previously made a couple of Rwanda documentaries, doesn't provide a lot of background information about this group, which includes geologists Allan Ashworth and Adam Lewis and two undergraduates. There are moments when you wish she'd stop and explain how certain necessities are handled, but she does a thorough job of suggesting the passions and motivations of these determined polar explorers. --The Seattle Times

Product Description

Unique in the genre of exploration and adventure films, ICE PEOPLE takes you on one of earth's most seductive journeys Antarctica. Emmy-winning documentary filmmaker Anne Aghion spent four months on the ice with modern-day polar explorers, to find out what drives dedicated researchers to leave the world behind in pursuit of science, and to capture the true experience of living and working in this extreme environment. Intense public focus on global warming has turned the shores of Antarctica into a new tourist mecca. But, inland from the penguins and ice floes is a magical Antarctica of volcanoes, boulder-strewn valleys and ominous glaciers. Only a small number of scientific research teams get there, braving severe conditions to learn about our planet s history, and make predictions about our future. ICE PEOPLE heads out into the deep field with noted geologists Allan Ashworth and Adam Lewis, and two undergrad scientists-in-the-making, where they scour across hundreds of miles to find tiny, critical signs of ancient life. As it turns out, the film also witnesses one of the most significant discoveries about climate change in recent Antarctic science: evidence of a green Antarctica over 14 million years old, that disappeared with a sudden shift in the temperature of the continent. The most authentic film about life on the ice since the trailblazing expeditions to Antarctica chronicled nearly a century ago, ICE PEOPLE conveys the vast beauty, the claustrophobia, the excitement and the stillness of an experience set to the rhythm of nature.

Customer Reviews

4.1 out of 5 stars
(11)
4.1 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers
Most Helpful Customer Reviews
5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Wonderfully shot, June 23, 2009
Format:DVD
This is a beautifully shot film, a must see in high-definition. There is no over-dramatization or attempt to alter the reality of life of researchers in the world's toughest research facility--Antarctica. The serendipitous discovery of the fossil by the small team of researchers captured in the film is a bonus (it later made big news, which indicated that the Polar region was much warmer than previously thought) If you appreciate the artistry of good film-making, this one is not to be missed.
Comment | 
Was this review helpful to you?
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Gorgeous, meditative view of life in Antarctica May 24, 2010
Format:DVD
Beautifully shot documentary on the day-to-day life of a group of scientists in Antarctica. Very little in the way of narration, or an obvious organizing principal, this is more meditative, observational (and occasionally more meandering) than your usual documentary, But it somehow that style feels exactly right for the surrealistic majesty of the settings. Ms. Aghion is proving to be one of our more interesting and brave documentarians. (I'd urge those interested in documentaries to check out her series of 4 films about the aftermath of the genocide in Rwanda).
Comment | 
Was this review helpful to you?
2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Wonderful Exploration Film November 7, 2009
Format:DVD
I first watched this on Sundance Channel & knew I had to share this film with my friends that are science and exploration fans. The documentary leaves you with mixed emotions on what it must be like to stay for months in one of the most remote locations on Earth. It's an amazing journey with unexpected scientific discoveries.
Comment | 
Was this review helpful to you?
3.0 out of 5 stars Science in the Field January 14, 2014
Format:Amazon Instant Video|Verified Purchase
No grade inflation here: I liked this film, but caution that its portrait of Antarctica's Dry Valleys and the four geologists working there is not directed at adventure-seekers. Its pace is deliberate--one of the most intense sequences involves fossil leaf impressions--and the interviews sometimes drag a bit, but overall it effectively presents both the scientists at work and some seldom-filmed Antarctic geography. Recommended!
Comment | 
Was this review helpful to you?
Format:DVD
I sought out "Ice People" after having recently seen a couple of other similar-themed movies (more on that later), and was eagerly looking forward to seeing this.

"Ice People" (2009 releae; 77 min.) brings a look at the life of a small group of scientists stationed in Antartica. Not that you would know strictly from watching the movie that this is Antarctica. Indeed, there is no introduction of any kind, no identification of the location or any other clue and it isn't until 30 min. into the documentary that one of the scientists actually utters the word Antarctica. If the goal of this documentary is to showcase the monotony of everyday life in Antartica, then it has succeeded at every level. At one point, one of the scientists comments: "this is where we come together for breakfast and talk, of course there isn't much to talk about as we all do the same thing everyday and we spend all our time together". We also witness the scientists digging into the grounds, I suppose for research. Not that you would know, as again there is no explanation, nor is there a narrator or voice-over to give the necessary background. Yes, at times the visual are great, but that happens only a few times in the movie.

In all, I can't help but feel very disappointed by this documentary, even more so when I compare it to those 2 other documentaries I saw not too long ago: first there is "Chasing Ice", a 5 star, MUST-SEE, documentary about the shocking changes in the ice mountains found on various spots around the word, with astonishing time-lapse photography that will have your jaw hit the floor. Then there is Werner Herzog's "Encounters At the End of the World", also on life in Antarctica, and while not a 5 star movie, still a mile or two better than "Ice People". I'd readily recommend either of them over "Ice People".
Comment | 
Was this review helpful to you?
4.0 out of 5 stars Gorgeous, meditative view of life in Antarctica July 26, 2012
Format:Amazon Instant Video
Beautifully shot documentary on the day-to-day life of a group of scientists in Antarctica. Very little in the way of narration, or an obvious organizing principal, this is more meditative, observational (and occasionally more meandering) than your usual documentary, But it somehow that style feels exactly right for the surrealistic majesty of the settings. Ms. Aghion is proving to be one of our more interesting and brave documentarians. (I'd urge those interested in documentaries to check out her series of 4 films about the aftermath of the genocide in Rwanda).
Comment | 
Was this review helpful to you?
Most Recent Customer Reviews
Search Customer Reviews
Search these reviews only

Forums

There are no discussions about this product yet.
Be the first to discuss this product with the community.
Start a new discussion
Topic:
First post:
Prompts for sign-in
 



Look for Similar Items by Category