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Ida [Blu-ray]


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Product Details

  • Actors: Agata Kulesza, Agata Trzebuchowska, Dawid Ogrodnik, Jerzy Trela
  • Directors: Pawel Pawlikowski
  • Format: Multiple Formats, Blu-ray, AC-3, Dolby, DTS Surround Sound, Subtitled
  • Language: Polish
  • Subtitles: English
  • Aspect Ratio: 1.37:1
  • Number of discs: 1
  • Rated: PG-13 (Parental Guidance Suggested)
  • Studio: Music Box Films
  • DVD Release Date: September 23, 2014
  • Run Time: 80 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 3.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (543 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B00L0DKRCM
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #15,077 in Movies & TV (See Top 100 in Movies & TV)

Customer Reviews

A bit slow for my likes.
LCBD
From her aunt Ida learns she is Jewish and that her parents and other family members were killed in the Holocaust.
Tom
Very beautiful, somber film.
Bobbie

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

Format: DVD
"Ida" (2013 from Poland; 80 min.) brings the story of a young woman, Anna, who grew up as an orphan in a Polish convent. It's now the very early 60s and before she takes her final vows to become a nun, Mother Superior sends Anna out to meet her aunt Wanda, the only family member she has (but has never met). When Anna and Wanda meet up, Wanda tells her the truth: Anna was born Ida, a Jewish girl whose parents perished in WWII and she ended up as a very young girl at the convent. Wanda and Ida decide to go back to the Polish village where the family perished. Will they get the true story behind the death of Ida's family? Will Ida turn her back on the convent and Catholicism now that she's told she is Jewish? What will become of Wanda? To tell you more of the plot would ruin your viewing experience, you'll just have to see for yourself how it all plays out.

Couple of comments: first, this is the latest movie from Polish writer-director Pawel Pawlikowski , who brought us the excellent "My Summer of Love" some 10 years ago. Here he brings yet another deeply moving story of a young woman, now Anna/Ida. Second, the movie is not only shot in black and white, but on top of that this is not a wide-screen movie (the aspect ratio is close to but not quite 1:1, very unusual). Third, there are several serious undertones, be they emotional, religious or otherwise, in this movie, The tension between Wanda, an alcoholic, non-practicing Jewish woman, and Ida, the shy yet curious Catholic-raised nun-to-be, is explored brilliantly in the movie. Then there is the issue of Jewish survivors of WWII, and the non-Jewish local population's tormented feelings about whether they did enough to help Jews in WWII.
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Format: DVD
This is a genuinely haunting film (in the Polish Language with subtitles) = completely immersed in starkly contrasted Light & Shadow (reflected in both visuals and characterizations) also imbued with powerful Silence & Stillness.

The story begins in the early 1960's, with Anna (played by Agata Trzebuchowska) sheltered behind convent walls most of her Life, ready to take her vows to become a full-fledged nun (she was hidden there as a baby by Polish neighbors, to conceal her Jewish origins from the Nazis during the early 1940's)

However, Anna is informed by the mother superior that she must first meet her only surviving aunt Wanda, before being confirmed. Aunt Wanda (played by Agata Kulesza) had been a prominent (nononsense and quite intimidating/intense) prosecutor during the mostly brutal Stalinist heyday in early 1950's Poland, but has now become an alcoholic second-tier 'administrator' in the slightly less brutal (though still quite dour) post-Stalinist period of early 1960's.
Wanda doesn't mince words, and quickly informs the sheltered Anna that her birth name was really Ida Lebenstein (and therefore she is actually a uniquely Jewish Nun) also informing her that Anna/Ida's parents were murdered during WWII. Anna still wants to pay condolences to her long-dead parents, but Wanda tells her that they (like most Jews of that terribly cruel time and place) were left in unmarked/ completely forgotten grave-sites (if buried at all)

However, the two still venture-on with the intention of finding whatever additional information they can possibly uncover regarding the true fate of Anna/Ida's parents (the mother being Wanda's beloved sister, and as we later sadly find out, Wanda's very young son who also perished there).
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24 of 25 people found the following review helpful By Radar on July 5, 2014
Format: DVD
No need to delve into the story or acting, many reviewers have that nailed.

For me though, the imagery and, especially, sounds brought me to a whole new place. The story necessarily puts us in a convent, where the old stone walls seem to make all sounds far more intense and sometimes very funny. Large parts of the story take place on a farm, in a quiet hotel and a pub with a dance band; all of these places are brought alive from the sounds that come from them -- if only I knew Polish!

And of all things, I was really impressed by the sound effect of someone sleeping deeply, a light snore really. We understand what it means, it's part of real world, but how often do we hear it in the movies?

The cars, so much thought went into it. With so much of the action being, "on the road", you'd never have any reason to believe this wasn't shot other than in 1962 in Poland. And the same goes with the trains, tractors, horse-drawn carts and, even, stereo systems of the time.
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34 of 38 people found the following review helpful By The Gabster VINE VOICE on June 21, 2014
Format: DVD Verified Purchase
This DVD was shipped to me from Poland and has English subtitles (thank goodness because I do not speak a word of Polish except for one curse word). I have a universal DVD player so I can play Region 1 or 2 or whatever else may be out there. The story is a compelling tale about postulant raised in a Roman Catholic convent as an orphan who is on the cusp of taking her final vows. Shortly before her marriage to Christ, the Mother Superior calls her into her office for a conference to inform her that she has been contacted by the girl's heretofore unknown aunt and Mother Superior strongly suggests that she visit the aunt before taking her final vows. The postulant discovers that her Aunt was born into a family of the Jewish faith and her deceased parents were murdered by a farmer shortly before the arrival of the Nazis who were destined to murder them. He took over their farm and claims it as his own. In exchange for the girl (Ida) and her aunt's promise to not dispute the ownership of the farm he promises to show them where he buried the family's bodies.

The acting and filming are simply magnificent and the experience of watching it as the aunt & Ida arrive at their destinations are haunting. This film is a must see for anyone who appreciates great film-making.
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