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100 Ideas that Changed Graphic Design Paperback – April 18, 2012


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100 Ideas that Changed Graphic Design + Thinking with Type, 2nd revised and expanded edition: A Critical Guide for Designers, Writers, Editors, & Students + Creative Workshop: 80 Challenges to Sharpen Your Design Skills
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Product Details

  • Series: 100 Ideas
  • Paperback: 216 pages
  • Publisher: Laurence King Publishing; 3.3.2012 edition (April 18, 2012)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1856697940
  • ISBN-13: 978-1856697941
  • Product Dimensions: 10.6 x 8.3 x 0.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 2 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (26 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #11,959 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

"...a feast for the eyes...As a survey of the many changes in graphic design and the dialogs between competing schools of thought, 100 Ideas is an entertaining, often insightful read." ~ Geoff Hart, STC Technical Communication Journal

FROM COOL HUNTING: "The scope is broad but intelligently refined, connecting all aspects of graphic design, from the age-old technique of text ornamentation to the relatively nascent appearance of pixelated images and digital type."

About the Author

Steven Heller is the co-chair of the MFA Designer as Author program and co-founder of the MFA in Design Criticism program at SVA, New York. For 33 years he was an art director at the New York Times. He is editor of AIGA VOICE and contributing editor to Print, Eye, Baseline and I.D. magazines. He is the author of more than 120 books on design and popular culture. He is the recipient of the 1999 AIGA Medal for Lifetime Achievement. Véronique Vienne has worked at a number of US magazines as art director, and is the author of The Art of Doing Nothing and The Art of Imperfection. A frequent contributor to Graphis and Metropolis magazines, she lives in Paris.

More About the Author

Steven Heller, author and editor of over 130 books on graphic design, satiric art and popular culture, is the co-founder and co-chair of the MFA Designer as Author program at the School of Visual Arts, New York. He is also co-founder of the MFA in Design Criticism, MFA in Interaction Design, MFA Social Documentary Film and MPS Branding programs. Although he does not hold an undergraduate or graduate degree he has devoted much of his career to fostering design education venues, opportunities and environments.

On the editorial side, for over 40 years he has been an art director for various underground and mainstream periodicals. For 33 years he was an art director at the New York Times (28 of them as senior art director New York Times Book Review). He currently writes the "Visuals" column for the Book Review and "Graphic Content" for the T-Style/The Moment blog (http://tmagazine.blogs.nytimes.com/author/steven-heller/). He is editor of AIGA VOICE: Online Journal of Design, a contributing editor to Print, EYE, and Baseline, and a frequent contributor to Metropolis and ID magazines. He contributes regularly to Design Observer and writes the DAILY HELLER blog for Print Magazine (http://blog.printmag.com/dailyheller/). His 135 books include "Design Literacy, " "Paul Rand," "Graphic Style" (with Seymour Chwast), "Stylepedia" (with Louise Fili), "The Design Entrepreneur" and "Design School Confidential" (both with Lita Talarico), "Iron Fists: Branding the Twentieth Century Totalitarian State", and the most recent, "Born Modern: The Life and Design of Alvin Lustig."

He is the recipient of the 1999 AIGA Medal for Lifetime Achievement. His website is www.hellerbooks.com and his blog, The Daily Heller sponsored by Print magazine is http://imprint.printmag.com/daily-heller/

Customer Reviews

4.8 out of 5 stars
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A great gift for anyone that wants to know graphic design basics.
inna
It is a handsome book with lots to look at, well laid out and with informative text.
R. Hardy
A great book for the thinker or just someone who likes to look at the pictures.
jcjb

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

24 of 26 people found the following review helpful By R. Hardy HALL OF FAMETOP 500 REVIEWER on April 16, 2012
Format: Paperback
I wish that the book _100 Ideas That Changed Graphic Design_ (Lawrence King Publishing) had been bigger. That's a compliment, of course. The book is large format, with colored reproductions on almost every page, but still the text mentions a lot more examples than it includes. I found it handy to have my computer for consultation, so that when the authors mentioned, but did not illustrate, as an example of sequential narrative in pictures, "Trajan's Column (113 CE) in Rome, which is also the wellspring of Roman typography, telling the tale of the emperor Trajan through inscribed pictographs and words," I could easily see what they were talking about. Ditto for "the true forerunner of the modern sequence," a Suprematist book for children from 1922. There are two dandy included illustrations, though, one showing a Dubonnet ad, depicting a man drinking a glass of the aperitif and becoming sequentially more fulfilled thereby, and Milton Glaser's lighthearted take on Mozart silhouettes, _Mozart Sneezes_. The topic of sequential narratives is "Idea No. 58" of the hundred presented here, each of them on two pages, with brief, intelligent, and useful text to explain the idea and the two or three pictures that accompany it.

A reader realizes that the authors probably agonized over what to mention, to illustrate, and to leave out. They probably didn't want to stop at 100 ideas, and many of the ideas, like No. 58, could have their own books, not just two pages. I bet the authors, too, wanted their book to be bigger. We are in good hands; Steven Heller was an art director at the _New York Times_ for over three decades and Véronique Vienne has been the art director of various magazines.
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By D. M. Kemp on May 28, 2012
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I bought this book for my daughter who will be studying graphic design in the fall. It is a wonderful book filled with examples of the author's top 100. From small concepts, such as font usage, to the large architectural realm, it is covered well within this book.

Each of these topics can be covered further through some simple research, in case you want more in-depth understanding. This book simply gives a brief overview of each of each subject area and a few examples. Makes for a great conversation starter as you can flip through the pages and be inspired or forced to look at a subject differently.

Overall - a great primer into the world of Graphic Design.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By jcjb on January 7, 2013
Format: Paperback
This book is fascinating and makes an amazing gift for anyone, especially your science or sociology enthusiast. How many ideas do we now take for granted that didn't exist in human thought until someone tried to describe it through drawing? A great book for the thinker or just someone who likes to look at the pictures.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By kathryn e henderson on December 12, 2012
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This (like the other books in the series) gives a wonderful overview of many of the field's milestones. This is perfect for someone new to the field who is interested in learning more about graphic design or just as a reference book.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Margaret Newitt on January 10, 2013
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This book is one of his best. You learn from what he writes and how he presents his ideas. We are so fortunate to have such a unique talent in the business to continually help to raise the standards of design and aethetics. I wait for each new Steven Heller book and I am never disappointed. He has written a number of books on the history of typography and design and he always is able to find a new perspective and new material to spotlight.
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5 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Robert Kuhar on May 6, 2012
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Limitation to 100 concepts or ideas does very little damage on the value of the book. Examples a bit subjective but overall a very nice job. I recommend it for journalists, critics, students and for artists of any kind. For a correlative interdisciplinary look you should get the rest of "The 100 Ideas collection".
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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Goran on February 7, 2014
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Heller gets 5 stars, but not this book. Read the contents page and you'll know what's in the book. Then simply search for what interests you, and you'll find more information than this book can give you. The book is also printed on cheap paper and falls apart fast.

But if you'd rather have bits of information in print, get the book. And don't forget about Heller. He's amazing! Love him.
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I use it when I'm in the middle of a project and hit a brick wall. I thumb through this book, find an idea I like, and either draw inspiration from the given examples or research it more. Also, the book's layout is perfect. Just the right amount of info to illustrations, so I don't feel the slightest big overwhelmed going through this book.
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