If I Live to Be 100: Lessons from the Centenarians and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Qty:1
  • List Price: $14.00
  • Save: $4.72 (34%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Only 10 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
If I Live to Be 100: Less... has been added to your Cart
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: Eligible for Amazon's FREE Super Saver/Prime Shipping, 24/7 Customer Service, and package tracking. 100% Satisfaction Guarantee.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

If I Live to Be 100: Lessons from the Centenarians Paperback – March 23, 2004


See all 7 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
$9.28
$3.49 $0.01
Multimedia CD
"Please retry"
$15.00
$9.28 FREE Shipping on orders over $35. Only 10 left in stock (more on the way). Ships from and sold by Amazon.com. Gift-wrap available.


Frequently Bought Together

If I Live to Be 100: Lessons from the Centenarians + Understanding Your Grief: Ten Essential Touchstones for Finding Hope and Healing Your Heart
Price for both: $22.43

Buy the selected items together

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Choose Your Own Autobiography
Step right into Neil Patrick Harris's shoes in an exciting, interactive autobiography that places the reader squarely in the driver's seat. Learn more

Product Details

  • Paperback: 256 pages
  • Publisher: Three Rivers Press (March 23, 2004)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1400051428
  • ISBN-13: 978-1400051427
  • Product Dimensions: 8.1 x 5.3 x 0.6 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 8.8 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (23 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #389,338 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

For the National Public Radio series One Hundred Years of Stories, broadcast two years ago, Ellis interviewed Americans at least 100 years old some of them ailing or confused in their thinking, others completely coherent, lively and full of fascinating tales from the past and insightful wisdom gleaned from a century of living. The poignancy of a prolific writer and Hollywood veteran who can't remember enough to participate in the interview is offset by a woman who lives alone, still rows her own boat and occasionally skinny-dips, and by a man who marries for the third time at 103. Ellis reveals little of her own life here, and withholds any intimate introspection when, for example, a 101-year-old law professor describes his regret at spending so much time on his work rather than having a family and points out that Ellis's childless lifestyle is similar. On the other hand, she abandons straight journalism by indulging in a long tangent about "limbic resonance," or getting absorbed in someone's telling of a story. She concludes that "emotional connection with another person is all that will make you happy," but she tells readers this rather than letting her interviewees speak for themselves. If Ellis had stuck with the subjects' own voices and fleshed out their stories in more detail, this might have been a powerful oral history of America in the 20th century. Instead, it reads like a radio show brief quotes with a few sound bites of editorialization.
Copyright 2002 Cahners Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From Booklist

What if you could look into the future and learn what your life would be like during your final years? Undoubtedly you'd expect images of isolation and nursing homes, but Ellis shows us this isn't always the case through conversations with 15 exceptional centenarians she interviewed for her acclaimed NPR series, "One Hundred Years of Stories." From Anna Wilmot, still rowing her own boat on a Massachusetts lake, to R. L. Stamper, still preaching the gospel and looking for love, their stories are poignant and powerful, simple and sweet. Ellis struggles at first to find her voice, and theirs, and in the process learns perhaps the most important lesson the centenarians can offer: how to listen. As a professional journalist, Ellis first approached the project with the goal of accumulating information but in time came to realize there was more to be gained by acquiring knowledge, the kind of wisdom that can only be found when you listen closely to those who have lived long and lived well. Carol Haggas
Copyright © American Library Association. All rights reserved --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

3.8 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

31 of 32 people found the following review helpful By Robert G Yokoyama VINE VOICE on October 13, 2002
Format: Hardcover
I enjoyed reading this book very much. It is filled with stories about interesting people who have lived incredible lives Neenah Ellis is a journalist who spent an unforgettable year travelling the country listening to the stories of people who have reached the age of 100 and beyond for a National Public Radio series. I truly believe now that the secret to a long happy life is to stay active either mentally or physically. The people in this book can all attest to that. This book profiles educators like Margaret Rawson who published a book about dyslexia and her work in the field at the age of 96. Abraham Goldstein is a dedicated professor who has taught law for 70 years. I loved the story of Anna Wilmot who stayed active by paddling a rowboat and going skinny dipping.
I also enjoyed the story of Ruth Ellis who was the oldest black lesbian. She was an accomplished public speaker and gay activist who made 100 appearances in a 1 year speaking on college campuses and gay functions all over the country. Ruth Ellis achievements have not gone unnoticed as a film has been made about her life. The story of Louisiana Hines is interesting because her grandfather was a slave. She can vividly recall how blacks were lynched for preaching about equality in the early years of the 20th century.
Roy Stamper became a successful horse trainer He also developed a love for preaching despite having only 4 years of formal education. Roy Stamper proved that it is never too late to fall in love, because he got married at the age of 101.
Sadie and Gilbert Hill were married for an amazing 81 years. The secret to their long marriage can be summed up in one word together. They did everything together from cooking to shopping to dancing. This couple even worked together as farm caretakers milking cows and herding cattle. I loved the story of Harry Shapiro whose life has been prolonged and enriched by his passion to paint. If I live to be 100 is a wonderful book.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
30 of 32 people found the following review helpful By A. J. Valasek on December 2, 2002
Format: Hardcover
Based on the title, I was truly expecting to read the "wisdom of the ages." Unfortunately, other than a few snippets and a couple of generalizations, the majority of this book is centered on the frustrations of obtaining the knowledge being sought and the process by which the author was able to acquire some patience with the elderly. To the author's credit, she mentions that this is how the book will transpire early on. To the author's discredit, she never changed the title appropriately. Kudos to the power of marketing and a lesson for those considering this title, "Read the reviews."
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
17 of 17 people found the following review helpful By larrisg on September 12, 2004
Format: Paperback
When I saw the title of the book I was very excited. The whole concept of the book was so appealing that I could hardly wait to get started. After reading the first chapter the excitement faded. The concept of recording the views and experiences of centenarians is wonderful and worth the 3 stars that I give this book, however the author missed a great opportunity to really explore the ideas and views of this very small group of our population. Her lack of patience and willingness to give the time to allow these people to communicate and record thier life experiences is sad. As a reader I felt very cheated that she did not fulfill her obligation she gave in the title of the book. Who should really feel cheated is the centenarians who gave up precious time to an author who valued her own time more. She writes on more than one occasion that the time she spends with some of these people is wasted time. She doesn't really elaborate on things that myself as a reader really care about. For example what do you think about the world today and where it is headed. What is the secret to being married 50 plus years? What advice do you have for teenagers, baby boomers, women, men, etc? What is the most positive change in the world in your lifetime? What is the most negative change in the world in your lifetime? These are just a few examples the questions I would have liked answered. All we can hope for is that a more UNSELFISH author will take this idea and run with it.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
8 of 8 people found the following review helpful By "blissengine" on December 10, 2002
Format: Hardcover
Ellis produced a program for National Public Radio for which she interviewed people who were a hundred years old or older. She interviewed a wide variety including Margaret Rawson (a world-renowned expert on dyslexia), Ruth Ellis (the oldest living lesbian), Sadie and Gilbert Hill (married for over eighty years). At first, Ellis is focussed on the historical aspects of their lives, but soon finds herself on a personal journey of her own, where she connects to them as individuals alive in the world and begins to see how looking forward, not backward, is a secret to longevity, as is living in the here and now. More of a story of Ellis herself than the centenarians she met, "If I Live to Be 100" is a surprisingly luminous memoir that charms the reader and opens the mind to what it means to be really alive.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
10 of 11 people found the following review helpful By Laura L. Egloff on November 27, 2002
Format: Hardcover
When I met Neenah must have been the morning after she had camped under Anna's window. I too was awake early the August morning, waiting for Anna to come home from her morning row. It was the day after one of her many birthday parties, and I wanted to tell her how nice she looked on the tv. I hopped on my boat just as Anna was nearing the shore and cruised my way over there before she started up her hill.
Anna introduced me to Neenah, saying that Neenah was going to share my dear Anna with the rest of the world. And after reading this book, I'm here to tell you that Neenah has truly captured the real Anna.
I'll admit I originally only bought this book to read about my friend, but I found myself drawn to all of the Centenarians and the stories they had to share. In the mean time I learned things about Anna that I never knew. I never knew Anna's husband Fred. He had died before I was born! Anna was my favorite babysitter (when she was 70 something, and I was in grade school).
She is still in fine health all though her hearing is going and her knees are bad. She often calls me up to find out how my love life is going. Anna has promised to dance at my wedding, and I'm going to hold her to that. But she has told me that she's getting tired so I better get to it!!!

And just remember this....
Don't eat the fish!!!

Addition: Aug 2005... Anna has just celebrated her 107th birthday, and is still going strong.

Addition: May 2009... Anna has lost her battle with old age... She passed away on Mothers Day at age 110. She shall be remembered.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews