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Ignite the Power of Art: Advancing Visitor Engagement in Museums (Dallas Museum of Art Publications) Paperback – January 24, 2011


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Product Details

  • Series: Dallas Museum of Art Publications
  • Paperback: 238 pages
  • Publisher: Dallas Museum of Art (January 24, 2011)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0300167547
  • ISBN-13: 978-0300167542
  • Product Dimensions: 9.1 x 9.1 x 0.4 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.8 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #895,854 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

"Bonnie Pitman writes with a leader's analytic vision and capitalizes on the institutional experience of the Dallas Museum of Art's staff and an overall commitment to research. . . . This book adds to a growing museum theory base of different ways to think about visitors."—Susy Watts, Museum
(Susy Watts Museum)

About the Author

Bonnie Pitman is the Eugene McDermott Director at the Dallas Museum of Art and serves on the Board of American Association of Museums. Ellen Hirzy is an independent writer and editor for museums, arts organizations, and other nonprofits.

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By shelley kruger weisberg on February 8, 2011
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Ignite the Power of Art sparks visitor connectivity with museums. Kudos to Pitman and Hirzy for developing a framework for engaging that is grounded in research and speaks to the preferences of the museum visitor. This work is an inspiring contribution to all museums that seek memorable and meaningful visitor engagement.

Shelley Kruger Weisberg
Program originator, Museum Movement Techniques
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Ruth on June 27, 2013
Format: Paperback
I found Dr. Pitman's informative book while doing graduate research on the Dallas Museum of Art. In the art world, many people will see something or read something and say, "That's been done." Well, this book and Dr. Pitman's groundbreaking work was new to me and I absolutely could not put it down. Dr. Pitman did an amazing job leading the cultural shift in the museum from "exhibition museum to visitor centered museum." I live in Dallas and I recently visited the Late Nights for the first time as a result of reading Ignite the Power of Art. There were over 9,000 people there, making meaningful connections with the work and sharing special times with their friends. This outpouring of support for the Museum and its programs by thousands and thousands of people is a direct result of Dr. Pitman's powerful work which is so beautifully documented in this gorgeous, can't - put - it - down work of art. My husband does not like to read that much and even he read the entire book. The photographs in the book are also very striking; a beautiful work of art all around!
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Jeff on June 22, 2013
Format: Paperback
Excellent detailed account of how the Dallas Museum of Art experimented and transformed itself from just a museum like any other into unique cultural magnet and hot spot for everybody to experience the museum in a way that personally speaks to them the best.
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8 of 22 people found the following review helpful By John Viramontes - Council for Artists' Rights on January 27, 2011
Format: Paperback
Pitman's concept is not new. In 1993 former Metropolitan Museum of Art director Thomas Hoving authored "Making the Mummies Dance: Inside the Metropolitan Museum of Art" about his experience and after being urged by a New York City mayor to make the Met more attractive to the public. In Russell Lynes 1973 book "Good old Modern: An intimate portrait of the Museum of Modern Art" Lynes wrote about long time MoMA director and expert exhibit installer Rene d'Harnoncourt, who said "Who comes first, the installer or the guy who's being installed?...A museum director shouldn't add to a work of art, he must not prostitute the whole thing and finally make a peepshow of it....If some museum directors like to do that sort of thing, let them use eggs, not works of art." Another example can be found in editor Brian O'Doherty's 1972 book "Museums in Crisis." Bryan Robertson wrote a chapter for it entitled "The Museum and the Democratic Fallacy" and says "...the public, conditioned by the strenuous and massively simple slogans of advertising and the super-realistic giantism of cinemascope, now expects to find a commensurate spectacle at the museum and is dismayed not to find some semblance of showbiz glitter in the permanent collections as well as temporary installations. But it is absurd that the size of an audience should take precedence over what happens to visitors inside a museum. Numbers may relate to a democracy but not to art." In Harold Rosenberg's 1983 book "Art on the Edge: Creators and Situations" chapter 25 and 26 zero in on what has become of the art world in the U.S., essentially saying the artist had been demoted, that what art critics had to say about art had become more important than either the artist or the work itself.Read more ›
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