Igor Korneitchouk: Viola Concerto / William Thomas McKinley: Concerto for Orchestra No. 2

June 24, 2002 | Format: MP3

$8.99
Song Title Artist
Time
Popularity  
30
1
17:35
30
2
3:17
30
3
10:55
30
4
3:45
30
5
6:55
30
6
3:10
30
7
4:59
30
8
4:33
30
9
4:47
30
10
5:21
30
11
9:17

Product Details

  • Original Release Date: June 24, 2002
  • Label: MMC Recordings
  • Copyright: (c) 2006 MMC Recordings
  • Total Length: 1:14:34
  • Genres:
  • ASIN: B000QZR5X4
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #747,474 Paid in Albums (See Top 100 Paid in Albums)

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Some Guy on November 14, 2012
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
[Disclaimer: There are many very good reviewers at Amazon who are classically trained and essentially subject matter experts. Me, I'm a layman who's been listening for a few decades and has picked up some understanding along the way. Please take my reviews in that context]

What an experience! This is the first I've heard of Igor Korneitchouk. Born in Madrid in 1956 to German and Russian parents, and musically educated in the United States, he definitely has an ecclectic biography. His music, too is ecclectic, with such a unique voice, and I consider him the greater find compared to the otherwise wonderful music of McKinley also on this disk. The booklet notes say Korneitchouk is primarily concerned with form, and that comes through, even to a layman's ear like mine. But the music is far from some kind of technical analysis that only a pure music theoretician or a mathematician could enjoy. This is lively and alive, raucous, surprising, unusual music but yet somehow understandable to the layman.

His first piece is a viola concerto entitled "Coaxing the Shadows to Move of Their Own Volition", a kind of viola concerto that you would expect to have been written for Kim Kaskashian. The violist here though is Karen Dreyfus, and she makes a lush, beautiful sound amid all the technical challenges of the work. Well, as said above, Korneitchouk is concerned with form. In his own words, this concerto "is concerned with the illusion of a three dimensional space" to the music. There are three sound groups that represent the three dimensions of space (horizontal, height and depth). OK, and it goes on, very understandable but a bit much to get into it here. I would rather talk about the emotional expression, which is spacious, mysterious and savage at various points.
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