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Illness That We Are: A Jungian Critique of Christianity (Studies in Jungian Psychology By Jungian Analysts) Paperback – November 1, 1984


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Product Details

  • Series: Studies in Jungian Psychology By Jungian Analysts (Book 17)
  • Paperback: 128 pages
  • Publisher: Inner City Books (November 1984)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0919123163
  • ISBN-13: 978-0919123168
  • Product Dimensions: 8.7 x 6 x 0.4 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 4.8 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #965,067 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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20 of 21 people found the following review helpful By Rodrigo Negrete Prieto on April 10, 2009
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This little book -less than 120 pages long- is a jewel by any standard. I have to say I was raised as a Roman Catholic however convinced as an adult that Christianity has become an empty shell, being in the process of irreversible decay despite some sincere commitments of many of its adherents worldwide. Not that this book, written by a RC priest, changes this sad impression on me rather the surprise consists in discovering it contains a lucid explanation on why Christianity has arrived at this deteriorated stage. The book title "The Illness that We Are" refers to organized, institutional religions, pastors an vicars included whom, instead of recognize divinity and the focal point of their cult as a deep shared psychic /psychological feature embedded in human experience of the self, place both divinity and its focal point (the figure of Christ in this case) as an historical transcendent events exogenous to humanity, splitting once and for all the human and the divine and in doing so pushing the community of believers to live a kind of schizophrenic existence (my words, not Dourley's) where reason and faith are locked in a never ending battle.

Reform Christianity with its distrust of symbols and rationalistic propensity sooner or later give way to science and scientism, conceding both the upper hand and finally surrender to a grammar that they master better than a religious movement tilted to a more secular, earthly orientation (no wonder -I must add- that nowadays there is a surge in Anglophone countries of "let's deconstruct God literature" supported by writers akin to scientism -such as Dawkins or Dennett- more likely to win a decisive battle because the terms of the debate are at their side).
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9 of 10 people found the following review helpful By Rupert Taylor on April 7, 2010
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This book is even more relvant today than it was when published. It is somewhat a leap of faith (Jungian faith) to accept the notions in the book, however, the current spiritual and religious crises tend to reinforce what
the author talks about.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Arizona 2002 on July 23, 2012
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Being inclined to distrust institituions that demand adherence to authority, this review of the historical and psychological abuse of the rich biblical resources is welcome and encouraging. Some may find it abhorrent. I would expect that from one who does not have a reflective view of life in all aspects. If God is true, and I know God is true in my own life, what is the worry about focus on rigidity and right believing? We have failed to enact the story and in that failure we have become rigid in our thinking to compensate for the absence of the spirit in all things.
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