Customer Reviews


14 Reviews
5 star:
 (7)
4 star:
 (4)
3 star:
 (3)
2 star:    (0)
1 star:    (0)
 
 
 
 
 
Average Customer Review
Share your thoughts with other customers
Create your own review
 
 

The most helpful favorable review
The most helpful critical review


56 of 56 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars This Grimm is no fairy-tale
Very nice book! The edition I own is the 1983 printing, so I am unfamiliar with recent changes. Book has good drawings of leaves (often several), fruits, twigs, buds and leaf scars. Excellent info on summer and winter identification included in text and step-by-step outlines. The step-by-step outline starts at the front of the book and helps you identify the family...
Published on March 13, 2000

versus
3.0 out of 5 stars Alders seem to be missing from this book.
I haven't used this book enough to give it a fair rating. But the first tree I tried to look up was Alnus glutinosa. Couldn't find it. Then I did a search on "alders." Couldn't find that either. Knowing that alders belong to the birch family I searched that section page by page. No alders in this book? Hmmmm. Wonder what else is missing. Maybe I'm missing...
Published 1 month ago by Kim-Nora Schmidt


‹ Previous | 1 2 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

56 of 56 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars This Grimm is no fairy-tale, March 13, 2000
By A Customer
Very nice book! The edition I own is the 1983 printing, so I am unfamiliar with recent changes. Book has good drawings of leaves (often several), fruits, twigs, buds and leaf scars. Excellent info on summer and winter identification included in text and step-by-step outlines. The step-by-step outline starts at the front of the book and helps you identify the family in which the tree in question belongs. Then turn to the section on that tree family for help isolating which species you have on your hands. There are good text descriptions throughout to aid identification as well as information on history, growth, and commercial uses of the trees. Not a field guide for the size and weight conscious though. Keep it in your living room or SUV.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


68 of 70 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars More than identification, May 17, 2002
By 
Ohioanna (Columbus, OH United States) - See all my reviews
I bought my 1983 edition when I was active as a park district volunteer. What sold me on this book was that it went beyond the tree's identification, and told you more about the tree itself. For example, looking up the Sycamore it says "The Sycamore is also known as the Buttonwood, Buttonball-tree, and the American Plane Tree. It is one of the most massive of all our native trees, perhaps exceeding all others in the diameter of its trunk... The wood is heavy, hard, tough and coarse-grained; being difficult to work or split. It is used for furniture - both solid and veneer, interior finish, siding, musical instruments, boxes and crates. Practically all butcher's blocks are made from the Sycamore..." and so on.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


48 of 48 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars the best book by far for identifying trees, August 3, 2006
The instructor I took field biology with in college highly recommended this book. He thought it was by far the best guide for identifying trees. Now, years later and having used (or attempted to use) many different field guides, I know why he was so crazy about this book. Winter or summer, if you are looking at the bark, leaf, or bud, the very clear and detailed pictures and unambiguous text will allow you to identify any tree with certainty.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


30 of 30 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Illustrated Book of Trees: A great reference book, October 12, 2005
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This is an excellent and comprehensive book with detailed descriptions of trees by their leaves, flowers, fruits, buds,and bark. The trees are described in their summer and winter aspects. It is a fine reference book not a book to be used in the field to identify trees. You should have an idea which general family of tree you are looking at to narrow the search down as the trees are arranged according to family. At the beginning of each tree description is a section listing those characteristics that are most helpful in identifying the tree. There is also a section at the end comparing the tree to those with which it is most likely to be confused. A glossary of terms is given at the back of the book and dichotomous keys to the families are given at the front. At the beginning of each family more detailed dichotomous keys are given to help the reader distinguish one member of the family from another. Leaf shapes and edges as well as types of fruits, flowers, and buds are illustrated to help the reader understand terminology used in the descriptions

Although trees of Eastern North America is the subject of the book, it is not devoted only to native trees of the area.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


11 of 11 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Most thorough of the three books I bought., April 5, 2009
By 
E. Grubbs (San Antonio, TX) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This is really a review of three books simultaneously, because I bought them all at the same time. I couldn't figure out which one to get, because they all had good reviews, but they have very different features.

1. Tree Finder: A Manual for the Identification of Trees by Their Leaves (Nature Study Guides)
~~~~~~~~~~~~
Pros:
* 4"x6" 62 page pamphlet easily fits in a pocket.
* It is organized like a choose-your-own-adventure book, so it will ask you questions, and show you some small drawings explaining the question. The drawings next to the questions is probably the best part of the book, since it can be confusing if you don't know what it means for a leaf to be lobed.
* This is the only one that a 10 or 11 year old child might enjoy using to identify trees, although it can still be difficult.
~~~~~~~~~~~~
Cons:
* Once you identify the tree, all you get is the name. The book doesn't tell you anything about its flowers, fruit, lifespan, etc.
* It only contains 161 species. This seems like a lot, but I have run into interesting varieties in my neighborhood such as the Chinaberry, Chinese tallow tree, Chinese parasol tree, or Shumard Oak. In fact, it only has 21 oak varieties, whereas the "Illustrated Book of Trees" has 38.
* Drawings are only in one shade of green and black.
* It only helps you identify trees if their leaves have not fallen.
~~~~~~~~~~~~
Summary:
I gave up on this book pretty quickly, when I failed to identify some trees exactly.

2. Trees of North America: A Guide to Field Identification, Revised and Updated (Golden Field Guide from St. Martin's Press)
~~~~~~~~~~~~
Pros:
* Very nice multicolor drawings. This is especially helpful for understanding the different parts of a bud, or for identifying fruits or flowers.
* Provides a good size paragraph of description of most species.
* 730 species covered, although this number seems misleading. For example, it has 40 species of Oak compared with the "Illustrated Book of Trees", which has 38 species of Oak but only 250 species total. It does include some odd items like the Saguaro cactus, so it might have a lot of items that aren't typically thought of as trees.
~~~~~~~~~~~~
Cons:
* It won't help you identify a tree quickly. You would have to read the whole book until you found the one that matched.
* The index listed the Chinese tallowtree, but when you go to that page you just see the Chinaberry.
* The description of each species is helpful, but could be bigger.
~~~~~~~~~~~~
Summary:
Since I am mainly interested in identifying trees, I haven't used this book much at all. If I want to see a pretty picture of a tree for which I know the name, I'll just google it.

3. The Illustrated Book of Trees: The Comprehensive Field Guide to More Than 250 Trees of Eastern North America
~~~~~~~~~~~~
Pros:
* It includes a tree identification guide for both summer and winter characteristics. (I have not tried to identify a tree without its leaves, though.)
* It includes a half page to a 1.5 page description of most species. That is approximately 250-750 words compared to the approximate 100 words per description in "Trees of North America".
* It contains over 250 species, which has been quite useful.
~~~~~~~~~~~~
Cons:
* This is the hardest book to read. I was constantly looking up words like glabrous, lanceolate, falcate, and root suckering. Fortunately, it has a glossary.
* The drawings are in black and white. This isn't that bad for leaves, but it is very hard to understand the representation of twigs and their leaf scars.
* The tree identification guide is not always as helpful for a large family or genus. For example, it will tell you that the tree is an oak, and then you have to look through 38 descriptions of different oaks.
* I was not able to use it to identify a tree as a willow oak. I was surprised that the "Tree Finder" was able to identify willow oak, although I didn't actually try that until after I had identified the tree, since I had given up on the "Tree Finder".
* I think most children would prefer the pretty pictures in "Trees of North America" over the content in this book.
* The only sycamores it describes are the American and the London plane tree. The "Trees of North America" includes the California, Arizona, and Oriental sycamores.
~~~~~~~~~~~~
Summary:
This book is more usefull than the other two combined, although it can be frustrating nonetheless.

All three books leave out useful information such as how fast a tree grows or how acidic or alkaline the soil can be.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Best Guide on the East Coast, July 22, 2010
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This is by far the best field guide I have ever used for identifying woody plants on the East Coast. I've been using it for an state park internship, and have identified almost ever species in the park. The dichotomous key is easy to use, very complete, and certainly beats flipping through page after page comparing photographs to the tree in front of you. The line drawings are more user-friendly than photographs, as there are no background plants to distract the reader from the tree in question, and the major details of leaves, bark, and scars can be more easily pointed out. While larger than most field guides, it fits well in a backpack; comes with me everywhere. A must for anyone dealing in an outdoors setting.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Simply the Best Book of its Kind, May 14, 2009
My "Book of Trees" is a much older edition, worn and tattered, filled with personal notations and a thumbing index I made myself. And despite the fact it is quite a large book, it is often in my day pack and canoe, as smaller guides simply won't do. And though there are many colorful tree guides on the market filled with fancy photos; don't be fooled; the drawings in Grimm's book render more precisely the critical aspects for accurate tree identification--similar to the manner in which the Petersen Bird Guides (through paintings) delineate the truer, more typical specimen.

While it is certainly advisable to have other guides for cross reference; and several of them are quite good; there is always the temptation to question yourself, "if I could only possess one, which would it be?" Of course, when it comes to tree identification and tree lore, it would be W.C. Grimms Book of Trees. Its usefulness in any season, its beautifully written, well researched text, its wealth of information, and its simplicity of use make it a downright indispensible guide. It is the only book of its kind that can be all these things and at the same time, simply fun to read. If you love nature, trees and wood, you'll love this book as I do.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Very comprehensive, July 22, 2008
This book gives an excellent overview of the trees found in the eastern part of North Amercia. Only way it could be better would be if some of the illustrations were in colour. Great value for money.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


3.0 out of 5 stars Alders seem to be missing from this book., September 1, 2014
I haven't used this book enough to give it a fair rating. But the first tree I tried to look up was Alnus glutinosa. Couldn't find it. Then I did a search on "alders." Couldn't find that either. Knowing that alders belong to the birch family I searched that section page by page. No alders in this book? Hmmmm. Wonder what else is missing. Maybe I'm missing something.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars Field Guide to Trees, January 26, 2014
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
A most have book if you are studying horticulture. The describes in detail ( identiffy )species of trees by describing all parts of the tree.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


‹ Previous | 1 2 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

Details

Search these reviews only
Send us feedback How can we make Amazon Customer Reviews better for you? Let us know here.