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I'm Still Here


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I'm Still Here + He's Still Here: The Biography of Joaquin Phoenix
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Product Details

  • Actors: Joaquin Phoenix
  • Directors: Casey Affleck
  • Format: Multiple Formats, Closed-captioned, Color, Dolby, NTSC, Subtitled, Widescreen
  • Language: English (Dolby Digital 5.1)
  • Subtitles: Spanish
  • Region: Region 1 (U.S. and Canada only. Read more about DVD formats.)
  • Aspect Ratio: 1.78:1
  • Number of discs: 1
  • Rated: R (Restricted)
  • Studio: Magnolia Home Entertainment
  • DVD Release Date: November 23, 2010
  • Run Time: 108 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 2.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (135 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B00406UJWO
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #49,636 in Movies & TV (See Top 100 in Movies & TV)
  • Learn more about "I'm Still Here" on IMDb

Special Features

  • Commentary with Casey Affleck, Joaquin Phoenix, and cast and crew
  • Commentary with Casey Affleck
  • Deleted scenes with commentary (over 90 minutes)

  • Editorial Reviews

    Product Description

    The directorial debut of Oscar nominated actor Casey Affleck, I'm Still Here is a striking portrayal of a tumultuous year in the life of internationally acclaimed actor Joaquin Phoenix. With remarkable access, I'm Still Here follows the Oscar nominee as he announces his retirement from a successful film career in the fall of 2008 and sets off to reinvent himself as a hip hop musicians. Sometimes funny, sometimes shocking, and always riveting; the film is a portrait of an artist at a crossroads. Defying expectations, it deftly explores notions of courage and creative reinvention, as well as the ramifications of a life spent in the public eye.

    Amazon.com

    Art prank or self-immolation? I'm Still Here claims to be a documentary about Joaquin Phoenix, star of Walk the Line and Gladiator, as he shucks his film career for a new life as a rapper, transforming himself into a pudgy, sullen, unkempt man-child. The result is a sometimes mesmerizing, sometimes tedious portrait of life within the dehumanizing bubble of celebrity, as Joaquin (or "Joaquin") abuses his entourage, pursues P. Diddy to produce his album, cavorts and does drugs with prostitutes, and finally has a supremely awkward appearance on Late Night with David Letterman, which triggers an emotional implosion. What are Phoenix and cowriter-director Casey Affleck after--an x-ray of their lives under the spotlight of fame? An essay on the banality of decadence? A heartfelt exploration of how hard it is to escape the labels placed on us? The movie may simply be evidence of the true project, which was planting a meme in our culture--demonstrated by the abundance of parodies and caustic commentary heaped on Phoenix after his Letterman interview. Whether it's real or fake or a variation on the Borat approach of provoking real responses through fake behavior, there's no questioning Phoenix's thorough immersion in this persona. Whether it's a performance or a perverse martyrdom, it's impressive. --Bret Fetzer

    Customer Reviews

    If anything, this is a sad depiction of what drugs can do to a person.
    Steve Nutting
    As a fictional experiment, I still think the film and its topic play out too often in real life to be particularly revelatory here.
    K. Harris
    I'm just happy to know that it was in fact a mockumentary and he's not really like that.
    ATLreviewer

    Most Helpful Customer Reviews

    45 of 55 people found the following review helpful By K. Harris HALL OF FAMETOP 50 REVIEWER on October 5, 2010
    Format: DVD
    Madness or high-concept performance art? "I'm Still Here," the faux documentary about actor Joaquin Phoenix, is likely to baffle and divide its audience. When Phoenix decided to quit acting, and seemingly hygiene, to pursue his passion of becoming a rap star--his friend and brother-in-law Casey Affleck was there to follow and film the inevitable fall from grace. There was rampant speculation from the get-go about the legitimacy of the endeavor (especially as it was all being filmed), but the longer the debacle played out--the less it seemed to matter. Fake or real, the damage was being done. Now, almost two years later, to have the entire experience and film declared a ruse seems the ultimate act of futility. Who, exactly, is the joke on? And to what purpose?

    "I'm Still Here" covers all the trappings of a celebrity life in descent. Drug use, prostitutes, public intoxication, brawling and a "star" desperate to be taken seriously despite his best efforts to act a fool--we've seen the act before in countless narrative films and fictionalized biographies. We get a repeat of the infamous Letterman interview, the concert performance that became a YouTube sensation, and the incident where Phoenix attacked a concert goer. We also get to see moments of celebrity intervention--Edward James Olmos tries the spiritual approach while Ben Stiller tries to get Phoenix back to work. Much of the film is about a scramble to get into the music industry. Phoenix aggressively pursues P. Diddy, the film's most inspired performance, who is mainly just concerned about getting paid. Now that's real! And it all concludes on a rather ridiculous "arty" note which has got to be satirical.

    Affleck has maintained that this is his brother-in-law's best performance.
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    15 of 17 people found the following review helpful By Timothy Jackson on August 1, 2011
    Format: DVD Verified Purchase
    Among mockumentaries, I'm Still Here holds a unique place. It is brilliantly made, a clever parody of celebrity, and the culmination of a extended real world prank by Joaquin Phoenix as he very publicly announced his retirement from acting and into a hip hop career. As directed by Casey Affleck, it catches the vanity and self-entitlement of celebrity with a knowing sense. After all Phoenix comes from a life in the spotlight, one that took his brother's life, and Affleck, the lesser known than brother Ben, is no slouch in terms of talent and brains. So they fashion a cunning end to Phoenix's prank. At the time this was released, many still believed that he had lost his mind. For a year the public worried that this talented actor had really lost it. All your worst assumptions and emotions about the privileges of being a celebrity are tweaked in this film. The viewer became complicit in the the prank because we were had. It is a brilliant and unique idea.
    But the film holds up on its own, too. Like 'Exit Through the Gift Shop' by Banksy, it raises wonderful questions on art and life, celebrity and talent, by personally putting the filmmaker's, or artist's reputation on the line. And look for an great performance by Sean Combs (P. Diddy) as a hip hop entrepreneur who brilliantly parodies and plays with our expectations of Diddy himself.
    The message? We don't know these people, so perhaps we ought to give up the judgements we make of these celebrities and stars with whom we hold no real affiliation. After all, they are just like us they can be flawed - even if they are richer - a lot richer - more respected, more beautiful, and more privileged that we the huddled masses.
    2 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
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    7 of 8 people found the following review helpful By kerouac's ghost on September 25, 2010
    Format: DVD
    Watched this twice (PPV). If it's a gag, it was cleverly conceived and brilliantly executed. If it's a gag, it's right up there with "This Is Spinal Tap".

    Now, if it is not a gag, well, Joaquin Phoenix has transformed himself into the ultimate in Hollywood cliches. The misunderstood actor who wants to move past the restrictions of Hollywood and "express his art". If it is not a gag, the real issue is that Phoenix is a dope addict and a rotten person indeed...but it's almost certainly a gag.

    The highlights:

    * About to meet P Diddy, Phoenix tells his companion: "Don't tell them you're from New Jersey".
    * There are a lot of scenes with men lying around on beds talking. One particular friend likes to expose his genitals for the cameras. There is another scene of a naked friend running around while Phoenix playfully chases him with a towel, popping the friend's hind end. As the movie progressed, I half expected a gladiator scene. Gag or not, there is a subtext here. Not sure whether that was intended or not.
    * Phoenix snorting coke (or powdered sugar) off a hooker's breasts.
    * Ben Stiller (in on it?) trying to convince Phoenix to play in his new movie. Phoenix accuses Stiller of "playing Ben Stiller" and that is exactly what he is doing. It was the same semi-loser character from all of his films.
    * Phoenix fleeing a movie premier and fighting furiously to get through a door with a huge "this is not an exit" sign on it.
    * The actual hip hop performances. Phoenix is like the huge drunk guy on karaoke night storming the stage to sing "Free Bird". The best indicator this is actually a big gag.
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