Qty:1
  • List Price: $32.00
  • Save: $1.60 (5%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Only 1 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Used: Very Good | Details
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: Very good condition. Clean text without highlighting or underlining. Tight spine. Shelf wear.
Access codes and supplements are not guaranteed with used items.
Sell yours for a Gift Card
We'll buy it for $2.00
Learn More
Trade in now
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Imagining Monsters: Miscreations of the Self in Eighteenth-Century England Paperback – November 15, 1995

ISBN-13: 978-0226805566 ISBN-10: 0226805565 Edition: 1st

Buy New
Price: $30.40
10 New from $26.41 10 Used from $17.00
Amazon Price New from Used from
Paperback
"Please retry"
$30.40
$26.41 $17.00
Free Two-Day Shipping for College Students with Amazon Student Free%20Two-Day%20Shipping%20for%20College%20Students%20with%20Amazon%20Student


Frequently Bought Together

Imagining Monsters: Miscreations of the Self in Eighteenth-Century England + Monsters of the Gévaudan: The Making of a Beast
Price for both: $61.90

Buy the selected items together
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Best Books of the Year
Best Books of 2014
Looking for something great to read? Browse our editors' picks for 2014's Best Books of the Year in fiction, nonfiction, mysteries, children's books, and much more.

Product Details

  • Paperback: 357 pages
  • Publisher: University Of Chicago Press; 1 edition (November 15, 1995)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0226805565
  • ISBN-13: 978-0226805566
  • Product Dimensions: 6 x 0.8 x 9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #3,006,558 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

3.7 out of 5 stars
5 star
2
4 star
0
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
1
See all 3 customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By A Reader in Washington DC on October 2, 2008
Format: Paperback
You really must read the first page of this -- it's shocking, true, and the study never lets up. Todd has a brilliant and learned eye for what's most interesting about this era. Great book.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
4 of 5 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on October 16, 2001
Format: Hardcover
This book is a undiscovered treasure that deserves a much larger audience. Todd is an extremely gifted writer with a talent for dry understatement. His style is perfectly suited to his story, which, in a lesser writer's hands, would read like an 18th century supermarket-tabloid tale (which it is, in many ways!). The stylistic subtleties appear to have flown straight over the head of the first reviewer. Never mind. This book is solidly in the tradition of W. J. Bate and Simon Schama: a scholarly work written with an elegant fluency that's far too rare among scholars. It will appeal to all kinds of readers, in the academy and far beyond.
I was able to locate a paperback edition that was much cheaper than the hardcover, but apparently is out of print. I urge the publisher to reissue the paperback, and find this gem the audience it deserves.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
4 of 9 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on April 16, 1999
Format: Paperback
This book attempts to put the the theory of 'maternal impressions' into the context of 18th century society and medical thinking. In particular, it recounts the case of Mary Toft, a woman from Godalming in Surrey who claimed to give birth to numerous rabbits! It is clearly the result of considerable research, but the author is very far from a 'natural writer' and bores his audience throughout. A generous helping of turgid sociological commentary throughout does not help matters. I can now understand why this book semms to have sunk without a trace soon after publication.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again