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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars It has its place...
I agree with all the other reviews to an extent. It 'reads' differently from Tony Robert's contributions and volumes from the original series set in the present. I noticed Casca is more concerned with his exposed blood affecting others in this tale than in other stories for example. I do not judge it better or worse. I am a follower of the Casca series and enjoyed reading...
Published on January 1, 2012 by The Original Guardian

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7 of 8 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Author Not As Good As Roberts
Tony Roberts and Michael Goodwin have taken up the mantle of the Casca series started by the late Barry Sadler back in 1979. In my opinion Mr Goodwin is not as good as Mr Roberts in continuing the line. Mr Goodwin is really big on telling us about the weapons being used, the martial arts fighting styles and multi-page battle sequences. None of these things were employed...
Published on September 10, 2010 by The Sultan of Sexy


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7 of 8 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Author Not As Good As Roberts, September 10, 2010
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This review is from: CASCA Immortal Dragon (CASCA The Eternal Mercenary, Volume 29)
Tony Roberts and Michael Goodwin have taken up the mantle of the Casca series started by the late Barry Sadler back in 1979. In my opinion Mr Goodwin is not as good as Mr Roberts in continuing the line. Mr Goodwin is really big on telling us about the weapons being used, the martial arts fighting styles and multi-page battle sequences. None of these things were employed by Barry Sadler and to me it's a different view of the Eternal Mercenary that Barry Sadler would not approve imho.

The book is fast paced and easy to read, but you feel like you're reading a Mack Bolan book and not a book about the worlds oldest soldier. I do recommend the book, but only give it 3 stars because this is not Casca as I came to know him and most die hard Casca fans I think would agree. In the future I think it would be to Mr Goodwins advantage to have more story and history and less boom and bang.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars PLAGIARISM ALERT!, June 25, 2013
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This review is from: CASCA Immortal Dragon (CASCA The Eternal Mercenary, Volume 29)
At least 10% of this product, which I call Immoral Draq-Queen, IS STOLEN / PLAGIARIZED FROM DAVID B. MORRELL'S RAMBO III!

I do not use the word "plagiarized" lightly. By "plagiarized," I mean, sections of this product, particularly in the opening scenes, were STOLEN, WORD-FOR-WORD, from Morrell's adaptation of the movie Rambo III.

Anybody who buys this product is buying STOLEN GOODS.

And nor is this the only time Goodwin has committed the CRIME of plagiarism. He has also plagiarized 1) Terry McCarthy's The Sword of Hannibal (for his Kindle product the original Mark of Cain, which has been removed by Amazon); 2) he has plagiarized the late James Hudson's The Five Fingers (for his Kindle product Cain the Sufferer); 3 & 4)he has plagiarized Andrew Jr. Fenady AT LEAST TWICE (The Trespassers and Double Eagles), respectively for his Casca: The Outlaw (Gay Outlaws) and Cain: The Wanderer.

The vendor of this product is likewise SELLING STOLEN GOODS. He should withdraw this from sale forthwith.
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6 of 8 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Igor's Review of "Casca: Immortal Dragon", February 18, 2009
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Evil Twin Igor "Igor" (Melcher-Dallas, Iowa) - See all my reviews
This review is from: CASCA Immortal Dragon (CASCA The Eternal Mercenary, Volume 29)
"Casca: Immortal Dragon" is the 29th tale of Casca the Eternal Mercenary to appear in print. Its author is Michael B. Goodwin. First, a brief synopsis of the series is included here, as this review will contain references to the series.

Casca Rufio Longinus is the Roman soldier who put the lance into the left side of Jesus Christ during the Crucifixion at Golgotha, and as related in the Gospels. In the Casca story, Jesus responds to the spearing by inflicting a curse of immortality on Casca (as NOT related in the Gospels). Throughout the ages, Casca is doomed to fight in endless wars, until the End of Time, when Jesus stages His Second Coming - and He presumably lifts the curse on Casca. References to "Longinus" are to be found in actual Christian folklore since the Middle Ages.

In some of the stories written for the modern Casca series, Casca is also pursued and tormented by the Brotherhood of the Lamb, a group dedicated to trying to bring about the Second Coming of Jesus, so that He can fulfill the mission that He was "prevented" from carrying out, when the "Spawn of Satan" (Casca) "murdered" Him before the Redemption was "complete."

Starting in the 1970s, former Green Beret Staff Sergeant Barry Sadler staged the modern revival of the Longinus saga, by writing over 25 action-thriller novels about him. Sadler had previously been famous for writing and singing the 1960s hit song, "The Ballad of the Green Berets." The song was in the Top 40 for over ten weeks and was used as the theme song for the movie "The Green Berets," starring John Wayne and (the still-in-the-closet) George Takei (who at the time was also playing Lieutenant Sulu on "Star Trek.")

The novels open up in Vietnam, 1970. Casca is once again fighting in one of his endless wars, this time on the American side under the name of "Casey Romain." Casca is wounded in action. While being treated in a field hospital, his incredible recuperative powers are witnessed by his field surgeons, Dr. Julius Goldman and Dr. Colonel Landries. (And when one thinks of it, anyone cursed with immortality must have AMAZING powers of recovery whenever wounded; otherwise, he would be killed dozens of times over, instead of merely being injured and able to recover from any battlefield injury.) Goldman and Landries are now onto his secret. The secret having been revealed to them, they become his friends, Goldman in particular. Throughout the next few decades, Casca periodically drops in on Goldman and regales him with yet another tale about some other war he had fought in. Goldman then "writes these tales up" and sells them as the fiction that we actually read in real life.

The Casca series went into hibernation after Sadler accidentally killed himself during the 1990s with a pistol in Guatemala City, while cavorting with a prostitute. The franchise has recently been revived with the permission of his estate, with new authors writing new Casca stories. In addition to Goodwin, new authors have included Paul Dengelegi and Tony Roberts.

And now for the review. "Casca: Immortal Dragon" starts off with a shoot-em-up at George Bush International Airport in Houston. Although the intent is that al-Qaeda will naturally be blamed for the atrocity, the actual perpetrators are the Thuggees of Kali. This is a group of crazies dedicated to reviving the cult of Kali, the four-armed, naked, dancing, Hindu death goddess after whom the city of Calcutta is named. There actually was such a cult. Its members committed ritual murders in Kali's name throughout India during the 18th Century, until the British stamped them out. We get our word "thug" from the name of this cult.

In the story, Goldman locates Casca in the dives of Bangkok, where he is eking out a subsistence existence, much like Stallone in the Rambo movies. Goldman introduces him to "Jeb Abraxxus," who is the head of Immortal Dragon. (I use quotes around the name "Jeb Abraxxus," because the name is so weirdly spelled, it seems pseudonymous.) Immortal Dragon is a private mercenary force. Think of it as a 21st-Century version of past mercenary groups like Executive Outcomes, or as a high-tech version of Blackwater. Goldman introduces Casca to "Abraxxus," in order to recruit Casca to fight the Thuggees of Kali. In order to establish Casca's bona fides to "Abraxxus," Goldman reveals Casca's secret to him. "Abraxxus" is able to recruit Casca, by informing him that the Thuggees have just murdered Landries in an airplane bombing that everybody blames on al-Qaeda. Casca is duly recruited to fight the Thuggees.

It turns out to be exactly the right thing to do, because the Thuggees are engaged in the most fiendish plot imaginable: the use of nuclear weapons stolen from Pakistan to touch off a worldwide nuclear holocaust, by setting them off in the "right" places. The nuclear holocaust will awaken Kali, so that she can rule the world with Jesus as her consort. (That's right!) The Thuggees also employ cloaking technology that makes them invisible. This is actually not as absurd as it seems. Invisibility technology has been written and speculated about in popular science journals for a few years now. It would require gobs of computer power to accomplish it, but it would be no surprise to me to discover that the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) is even now doing research on this field.

Goodwin never states the year in which his story takes place. But it is obviously in the near future; the cloaking technology demands that. Now, all previous Casca stories have taken place in the past. For a new story to take place in the future is offbeat, but so what? Why can't an immortal warrior fight wars in the future as well as in the past? This involves no violation of the Casca Timeline, except as Goodwin's story refers to Goldman and Landries (more on this later).

It turns out that the leader of the Thuggees is also the Elder of the Brotherhood of the Lamb. It is his intention to use the nuclear holocaust not only to awaken Kali, but also to force the Second Coming of Jesus Christ, so that she and He can rule the world together as each other's CONSORT.

Most of the action takes place in India or Pakistan, as befits a story featuring the Thuggees of Kali. Casca and his teammates continually fight the Thuggees, and are forced to come up with ingenious ways to neutralize their invisibility advantage.

WHAT I LIKED: Casca stories are ACTION stories, not Harlequin romances. Any action story requires plenty of action action ACTION. And Goodwin certainly delivers ACTION. This story is one firefight after another. Also impressive is Goodwin's command of modern weaponry and tactics. It has the ring of authenticity. If he was an Army Ranger or Special Forces soldier in a previous life, it shows in his writing. Goodwin's book also has a good plot: Casca has to foil a truly evil, vile plan to destroy the world. And in doing so, Casca frequently comes up with spur-of-the-moment, ingenious, low-tech ways to foil the invisibility technology - on one occasion using BAKING FLOUR. The invisibility technology is introduced skillfully, with lots of foreshadowing. Goodwin doesn't spring it on us out of nowhere like a "deus ex machina," nor does he just have a character explain it in a briefing. Instead, Goodwin starts small and introduces it gradually, using foreshadowing to let the reader get used to the concept. Goodwin's minor characters (meaning Casca's teammates) are well done. They are sympathetically portrayed without resorting to stereotypes.

Now, Casca purists may object to the cloaking technology, on the grounds that all previous Casca stories take place in the past when such technology didn't exist. They might also say that it turns a Casca story into "Starship Troopers" or science fiction. I don't share these objections. I see nothing wrong with the invisibility technology. I also see nothing wrong with introducing science fiction into a Casca story. Just because it has never been done before, is no objection to doing it now. This is FICTION. Why can't fiction use SCIENCE-fiction elements, particularly in a story that MUST take place in the future?

Casca purists may also object to the Thuggees of Kali. I don't agree here, either. Sadler himself didn't use the Brotherhood more than a quarter of the time. The Brotherhood is not essential to a Casca story and doesn't have to be used all the time. Why can't Casca have to fight another group of crazies? I think the Thuggees are a good group, a worthy foil of Casca.
WHAT I DIDN'T LIKE: the action action ACTION. There's too much. It's one firefight after another. It's overload. The details blur into one another. What Goodwin needs, and doesn't have, is a good "B" Plot to let the characters -- AND THE READERS -- decompress between firefights. While I don't object to and actually like the Thuggees of Kali, I most certainly DO object to their attempted amalgamation with the Brotherhood of the Lamb. No no no NO. Even as a perverted offshoot of Christianity, the Brotherhood adheres to the MONOTHEISM of Christianity. And the hallmark of ALL monotheistic religions - whether it be Christianity, Islam, or Judaism - is that their God is a JEALOUS god. When God says, "Thou shalt have no strange gods before Me," He MEANS it. And so do His adherents. NO WAY would the Brotherhood ever try to fuse itself with a pagan religion and NO WAY would it ever occur to the Brotherhood to try to MARRY JESUS OFF to a pagan goddess. (!!!!) They would NEVER countenance such a thing. Nor is it necessary to the plot. The Thuggees are a fully evil, vile group of crazies all by themselves and don't need the Brotherhood to make them more so. What I think happened is, Goodwin was already in love with the Brotherhood before he started writing (what Casca fan isn't?). In the course of writing "Immortal Dragon," he so fell in love with the Thuggees, he couldn't resist throwing BOTH into the soup. He should have resisted the temptation.

I also didn't like Goodwin's use of Goldman and Landries in this story. NO WAY would Goldman introduce Casca to "Abraxxus." Not only is it a gross violation of confidentiality and of their friendship, it exposes Casca to danger from the Brotherhood, by widening the circle of people who know of his secret. Further, Goldman WOULDN'T KNOW how to find Casca. He never knows where Casca is and never seeks him out. Casca always seeks him out. Goldman, after his Army days, is now just an M.D. at the Massachusetts General Hospital. How many M.D.'s there have the acquaintances in the spook community needed to bring about the introduction? (For that matter, how many M.D.'s at the WALTER REED ARMY MEDICAL CENTER ITSELF have such connections?) Actually, "Abraxxus" himself would be more likely to be able to do so, based on Casca's reputation (under the alias of "Casey Romain") as a superlative pirate-fighter (mentioned by Goodwin). And wouldn't it LESSEN Goldman's credibility with "Abraxxus," if he were to come to him with tales of an immortal mercenary? Goldman's and Landries' presences in this story are unnecessary and violate the timelines of previous Casca stories. Goodwin ought not to have used them.

Goodwin's book is plagued throughout by bad grammar and misspellings. (E.g., he uses "capitol" when he means "capital," and he misuses "it's.") He is too much in love with one-sentence paragraphs and even paragraphs that are nothing but sentence fragments. This is at its worst in the first two chapters, and continues at a low level throughout the rest. Now, one-sentence paragraphs and sentence fragments can actually be an effective writing technique - but only if not overused, which Goodwin does. Nor does the book's format help with this. This may be the publisher's fault and not Goodwin's, but there is no indentation or spacing between paragraphs. When this is combined with single-sentence paragraphs or sentence-fragment-paragraphs, the effect is jarring, discontinuous, annoying. It breaks the flow. The publisher should have simply bitten the bullet and allowed for spacing and indentation, at whatever extra costs in paper this may have entailed. I also didn't like the book's physical dimensions - 5.5 x 8 inches, instead of 4 x 7. This makes it harder to store in a bookshelf alongside previous Casca editions. Finally, and this may be a quibble, but for all of Goodwin's authenticity when writing about modern small arms, he lacks authenticity when describing civil aviation at George Bush International in the first paragraph. For someone familiar with civil aviation, as this reviewer is, it's annoying.

SUMMARY: I rated the book at three stars. I awarded stars for its plot, its authenticity, its action, its skillful introduction and use of personal cloaking technology, and for the Thuggees of Kali. I subtracted stars for: TOO MUCH action and the unrelenting tempo that doesn't allow for a breather; the attempted and unnecessary amalgamation of the Thuggees with the Brotherhood of the Lamb, the gratuitous and unnecessary and actually illogical use of Goldman and Landries, the bad grammar instances and misspellings. I would be willing to raise my rating to four stars if these flaws were edited out of future editions.
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9 of 13 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Should not be considered part of the Casca series of books., April 20, 2009
This review is from: CASCA Immortal Dragon (CASCA The Eternal Mercenary, Volume 29)
The hardest part of writing this review was where to begin. As a fan of the Casca series that was started by Barry Sadler and a Soldier in the U.S. Army I was distraught at his passing. Now others have picked up the mantle of writing the character and I have mixed reviews about them and their efforts but this review is specifically to address Mike Goodwin's attempt with Casca 29: The Immortal Dragon.
I will begin by addressing the writing there were so many spelling errors and grammar mistakes found through out the book that it became quite distracting pulling my attention away from the actual story. I am not an English professor or anything to break down all the grammatical errors present here but I did recognize enough of them for it to be a nuisance to my enjoyment. Not quite sure what if any review process was used before it went to print but I encourage the individual to slow down a bit next time and provide a little more attention to detail. When I purchase a book with the intent of sitting down relaxing the book should be written well enough to allow me to focus on and get lost in the story.
Now the lack of coherency with in the Casca time line was really frustrating. It really should be required that if you intend to write about a character or characters in your book based on pre existing characters you read all the previous books in the series that would affect the continuity of your story line. For example in the case of Robert Landries having apparently experiencing two very different deaths a previous author in a book written and released before this one has Robert Landries dying of cancer. Now this author decides either out of ignorance (lack of knowledge or unawareness) or decided Robert Landries deserved a much more flamboyant death than the previous author provided changed it to being blown up in a plane. Now does it really matter how Robert Landries dies, no but what does matter is that he had already died once in the series in a different manner so by now rewriting it to suit one's own needs. What can we expect next? Casca really wasn't really the Roman Soldier who pierced Jesus Christ's side it was his buddy, Casca just got in the way of the splattering blood and received the curse out of being at the wrong place at the wrong time. Maybe we decide to write that Casca never fought along side Genghis Khan or met Hitler as a matter of convenience in the next book.
As to the utter bastardization of Julius Goldman's character I was at an utter loss when reading. Julius Goldman has never been able reach out in all the books, all the stories; in all the years they have been friends to contact Casca. Julius Goldman has always had to wait for Casca to initiate contact either by subtle arrow head placement, business card, or arrival at his door. Now out of the blue he can just say hey Casca stop by I have something important to tell you. Julius Goldman accepted this as part of their friendship because he understood the dangers of open communications as a result of the Brotherhood's extermination of those that have associated with Casca in the past. This was Casca's way of protecting Julius Goldman. That being said let's now address the utter betrayal that would never have happened. Julius Goldman treasured the relationship he had with Casca; there is absolutely no way would he have told anyone Casca's secret having died first rather than utter a word. That is Julius Goldman you will find in any of the previous 28 Casca books not the contradictory character you find in this book. To take it a step further no where in any previous book in the series does it mention any where Julius Goldman having any contact with some black ops contacts, this surely would have been mentioned somewhere in the 70 year old man's past not to mention something Casca would have picked up on and distanced himself from. These things just don't fit in the pre-existing Casca series.
The Brotherhood of the Lamb going Muslim are you kidding me this is so wrong in so many ways I don't care how you try to justify pulling it together. The Brotherhood of the Lamb are followers of Jesus Christ intend on being there at the time of his return. I am not inferring that they don't try to rush that along with plagues here and there or with a nuclear bomb if the opportunity presents it's self, but again stay true to the principle ideas already established for this (fraternity or cult your choice). Thuggee is described as a cult of people engaged in the multiple murder and robbery of travelers that are known to be Hindu, Sikh, or Muslim none of which the Brotherhood of the Lamb have in any of the books in the series have ever associated themselves with nor would they with their beliefs. They know that Jesus Christ and Casca are destined to meet again just as they are sure of the miracle of Casca's immortality. Some content to wait it out watching Casca's journey through time, while others feel capturing and containing him is the best course of action. No matter what course they choose it has and will always revolve around Christianity. (Until Casca 29 anyway) If you tear down the code the foundation of the Brotherhood of the Lamb is built upon what can we expect next? Can we expect the next book to contain Brotherhood of the Lamb followers to be practicing Atheists or maybe Agnostics because it suits the needs of the author?
All of this being said what is most important in my opinion is that a lack of continuity, staying faithful to the timeline, and character biographies as these will completely ruin any book series that is based on as much history as the Casca series is. The author obviously needs to spend more time becoming familiar with the characters he is writing about. Grammatical errors aside the book might have been just fine if it were not part of the Casca series so a single star for the effort is all I am willing to put forth. My understanding is Mike Goodwin is already preparing his next endevour in the Casca series I hope more effort is put into it than this one.
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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars It has its place..., January 1, 2012
This review is from: CASCA Immortal Dragon (CASCA The Eternal Mercenary, Volume 29)
I agree with all the other reviews to an extent. It 'reads' differently from Tony Robert's contributions and volumes from the original series set in the present. I noticed Casca is more concerned with his exposed blood affecting others in this tale than in other stories for example. I do not judge it better or worse. I am a follower of the Casca series and enjoyed reading it. I suspect other followers are the same, they will want to read the book first and consider the reviews later rather than the other way around.

It does stir up a deep, primal yearning to fire a Calico M960!
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2 of 4 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars READY,SET,ACTION..........................., February 10, 2009
This review is from: CASCA Immortal Dragon (CASCA The Eternal Mercenary, Volume 29)
Wow, from start to finish this book holds the readers attention.Fantastic first book by Mr.Goodwin.I was very skeptical at first with the theme being in modern day,but what a job.If you have the ability to do what you did with your first book with Casca in modern times then I cant wait for your next novel no matter the time or place because I know it will kick some serious hiney.
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Action Action Action, December 31, 2008
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This review is from: CASCA Immortal Dragon (CASCA The Eternal Mercenary, Volume 29)
I have read nearly every Casca book written. This is easily the most action packed of the series (all due respect to Barry Sadler who's books are by far the best of the series). This book was very enjoyable to read. Fast paced and a quick read. A must read for any Casca fan.
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3 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars CASCA, the way it should be written!!!, January 13, 2009
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This review is from: CASCA Immortal Dragon (CASCA The Eternal Mercenary, Volume 29)
BUY THIS BOOK!!!.... Only if you enjoy almost non-stop action with very unique well-built characters centered around a great story. I have read Casca's from #1 to #18 and #25. This book is tough to put down, just like Barry Sadler's real good books. This particular author(Michael B. Goodwin) is quite masterful for such a new author at setting a scene that you can easily picture, filled with interesting and sometimes insane characters (Razak, Ali Jinnah and Big Bo are my favorites in this book). This book has more action than Sadler's works probably had, but the storyline continued to evolve with such purpose. Many people complain that the book series has gone the way of a history lesson, and to some degree, that is true. But not this book. This book's plot is so complex, with many layers of suspense and surprise. The author has done his homework. Action is great, but it needs to have a clear, distinct purpose so the reader keeps turning the pages. Casca #29, Immortal Dragon does that. Also, the choice of book title was right on the money, especially with Casca's not being able to die until Jesus' return to earth. I buy this type of book because the central male character(hero) is strong, gifted, weak and flawed all at the same time. That is the Casca (Sadler's) that Mr. Goodwin captures. I have read this book twice before I wrote this review. I hope Mr. Goodwin puts out another Casca very soon. I am ready for more of the same.
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3 of 7 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Barry Sadler lives again., January 7, 2009
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This review is from: CASCA Immortal Dragon (CASCA The Eternal Mercenary, Volume 29)
Barry Sadler lives in Mike Goodwin's writing. Finally some one who can live up to Barry's way of writing. I think Mike has Capture that. From His Cover Art work to his "action packed" adventures that Got me reading Casca When Barry was alive in the frist place. Oh and READING? Maybe it's a history lesson to you. Because you've missed alot getting use to the other Stale writers of casca in the past (not all But its been kinda so, so) Mike again way to go I am looking forward to your next book.
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3 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Five Stars for This New Novelist, December 26, 2008
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This review is from: CASCA Immortal Dragon (CASCA The Eternal Mercenary, Volume 29)
In CASCA: Immortal Dragon, Michael adds his own spin on the story that has enthralled and entertained readers for years before his debut, and he does so in a way that makes it a nailbiting thriller with very powerful insights into Casca's emotions and character. The action is nonstop and well choreographed, and it quickly propels the story into one battle after another, leading readers through this part of his life and preparing them for the next one, which promises to be even better.

As a long-time fan and friend of Michael's, I was delighted that the book was released in time for Christmas. It was one of the more memorable gifts that I sent to members of my family, and there have been nothing but rave reviews from everyone who received it.

CASCA: Immortal Dragon will sweep you away with its power and make you glad that you came for the ride.
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CASCA Immortal Dragon (CASCA The Eternal Mercenary, Volume 29)
CASCA Immortal Dragon (CASCA The Eternal Mercenary, Volume 29) by Michael B. Goodwin (Unknown Binding - 2008)
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