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Immortal Lycanthropes Hardcover – September 4, 2012


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Product Details

  • Age Range: 12 and up
  • Grade Level: 7 and up
  • Hardcover: 304 pages
  • Publisher: Clarion Books; 1 edition (September 4, 2012)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0547751966
  • ISBN-13: 978-0547751962
  • Product Dimensions: 8.3 x 5.7 x 1.1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 14.9 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (29 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,555,662 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From School Library Journal

Gr 10 Up-Myron Horowitz, an adopted orphan, is severely disfigured as a result of a childhood tragedy. A ninth grader who looks about eight, he is a misunderstood loner and suffers from constant intimidation. But a life-altering experience changes things forever when he unknowingly unleashes powers defending himself against a school bully. He discovers that he is a lycanthrope, a human/animal shape-shifter. The story is told by Arthur, who is also a lycanthrope. Sought after by others of his kind, Myron begins a bizarre and mysterious journey that involves kidnapping, misadventures, murder, dangerous tests, and numerous secret societies, all while trying to discover his true form and purpose in the world. Johnson's debut novel is original and thought-provoking, especially the unique mythology intertwined with literary and historical references. Unfortunately, the craziness of the plot makes it hard to stay committed and focused. Arthur's witty and snarky narration is entertaining but not enough to engage readers in the plight of the protagonist.-Donna Rosenblum, Floral Park High School, NYα(c) Copyright 2011. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

Review

"Filled with sarcasm and humor, this book will appeal to all teens . . . Teachers will love the high-level vocabulary (and content clues), sophisticated mathematical and scientific references, and non-stop allusions to writers, poets, books, and historical events."
VOYA

"Johnson's debut novel is original and thought-provoking."
School Library Journal

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Customer Reviews

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A great book, fast paced, exciting, hilarious, a truly fun read.
Book Lover
Which isn't to say I wasn't expecting it to be good -- I was, or else I wouldn't have bothered to purchase it.
Andrew M Tobia
The set up and plot line are interesting, but the way the character handles it makes it seem almost boring.
BookMonster

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

12 of 13 people found the following review helpful By Michael Roess on September 6, 2012
Format: Hardcover
Bertrand Russell once said that the sign of an excellent work in philosophy is that it begins by making a claim so obvious as to be banal. It proceeds from this to make a number of seemingly obvious inferences. When you reach the conclusion you think "of course, why did I waste my time on that rubbish" only to realize a few moments later that you are affirming something you would not, in your wildest dreams, have admitted before you began reading the paper.

This isn't a work of philosophy, but if we can adapt that evaluative rubric it is an excellent work of YA adventure fiction. We begin with something obvious--young people who are ugly get bullied by other slightly less young people. We then get an adventure--one that is a little beyond normal, but not so much to become unbelievable. As the series of adventures continues, each just a bit more adventuresome than the last, you are drawn into an increasingly fantastic world. You're spat out at the end thinking it a plausible world, only to realize that you'd probably have put the book down in the first 25 pages if you'd been thrown in at the outset.

There are a number of other wonderful aspects to this work, but I think people tend to not read amazon reviews of any great length. I'll end with a brief comment on the sentiment of earlier reviewers: if you think this material is a bit much for your YA aged child I would urge you to get to know your child a little better. S/he lives in a world different from the one you imagine.

Full disclosure--I am personally acquainted with the author. If you judge this circumstance corrosive to my judgement, then go here [...] to read a professional reviewer who certainly does not know the author talk about the book.
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Dr. Peter J. Glidden VINE VOICE on September 20, 2012
Format: Hardcover Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
This is a great book, er, uh, perhaps better described as a book written by a great author. In a post-Harry Potter world that teaches us that magic is NOT the answer to our mundane problems (see my review of The Magicians), when Good and Evil have clearly left the building to make room for good and bad, this is the book to read for all the ages of intelligence. The battles are gritty and not satisfying, the doldrums are tedious, and the phrase "give me a minute" will never hit your ear the same way.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Amazon Customer on September 28, 2012
Format: Hardcover
I've never read anything quite like this, and I can't quite classify it--and I don't mean that it "has a good personality." (Though it does. You should totally date this book.) It's just that it's marketed for ages 12 and up, so technically it's older middle grade? But it has YA sensibilities and an adult voice, so I guess it's more of a crossover book. I guess "12 and up" really is the most accurate description, but you have to shelve it somewhere, right? But everyone should read it!

Anyway, it's about a boy named Myron Horowitz, by all appearances a 13-year-old boy with a face as ugly as his name. He falls in with some shapechanging animals: so-called "immortal lycanthropes" who can assume human form. Some of them are kind of after him, and he's after some of them, and there are secret societies coming out of the woodwork, and there's even a doomsday device. Everyone wants to know who he is, especially Myron. He has lots of questions, most of all who he can trust and what his destiny is, as he travels the country encountering quirky and sage characters like an immortal gorilla, an immortal moose, an immortal red panda, and so on. And the answers to those questions will surprise you, dear reader. This is a trippy road trip with plenty of humor tempered by tragedy and philosophy; as Myron learns, sometimes all you can do is hold on for dear life and see where you end up. I think this book is a born classic that will hopefully be around for a long time.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By JK8 VINE VOICE on November 11, 2012
Format: Hardcover Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
I found the book to be very imaginative and it held my attention well. The story begins with a young boy who has been disfigured, and who is separated from his foster parents ... but we don't really know why ... but his adventures start at a junior high school where he is being bullied. He had been disfigured by something and has a face that people can't bear to look at. So he is unprivileged to start with. But we gradually learn that Myron is much more than a disfigured young 13 year old. He is an Immortal Lycanthrope. Now when I read this, I immediately thought, oh this is a werewolf book. But it's anything but. It is an entrance to an intense fantasy world where immortal people who can change into animals are trying to kill each other. I give this novel 4 stars for holding my attention. There are some minor flaws and a too-quick wrap-up in the end, but overall a very good read. This book would be appropriate for older young adults.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Samuel H. McMillan, Jr. on October 15, 2012
Format: Hardcover
As an older reader above the recommended age group, I was looking to read about my "Lon Chaney" experience from childhood. Surprise! This book meets my earlier experience and expands the horizons tenfold about the numerous possibilities of the human-animal relationship. It was an intellectual growth experience. I found myself reflecting on the profound use of vocabulary and the astute historical references and literary allusions throughout the book. As a former teacher, I recognized the cruelty of children in their adolescent days and in some ways enjoyed the escapist strategies of Myron to avoid conflict.

In conclusion, at the urging of my grandsons I read all of the Rick Reilly books on mythology and was impressed by the wide breath of knowledge of mythology he was able to include in the books. Harold has done the same with the study of the human condition in relation to the other earthly animals we encounter daily.
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