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60 of 66 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A well-written return by Stephen Carter.
Stephen L Carter is a professor of law at Yale University and the author of five novels and many works of non-fiction. His first three novels were set in the black communities of New York City, New Haven, and Martha's Vinyard, among other places. His characters were members of that little-written about community, the "Talented Tenth", or the black upper class. Stephen...
Published on May 23, 2012 by Jill Meyer

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34 of 38 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars A sprawling novel that tries to cover too many bases
Stephen Carter is a prolific writer who is known for his complex and detailed fiction such as "The Emperor of Ocean Park".
In "the Impeachment of Abraham Lincoln", he has taken on the task of writing a "what if" historical story with an intriguing premise.
What if Lincoln survived the attempt on his life by John Wilkes Booth? Carter has taken Lincoln to 1867...
Published on June 12, 2012 by rgregg


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60 of 66 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A well-written return by Stephen Carter., May 23, 2012
This review is from: The Impeachment of Abraham Lincoln (Hardcover)
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Stephen L Carter is a professor of law at Yale University and the author of five novels and many works of non-fiction. His first three novels were set in the black communities of New York City, New Haven, and Martha's Vinyard, among other places. His characters were members of that little-written about community, the "Talented Tenth", or the black upper class. Stephen Carter is a wonderful writer when writing on the history, community, and social lives of the "Talented Tenth". His fourth book, "Jericho's Fall", which was published in 2009 was a disappointment; it was a conventional spy thriller set in - Colorado. I read it, reviewed it, and gave it four stars. I wrote that Carter, after having written three marvelous novels, had returned with a middling story that took little advantage of what he, among few writers, really knew and could write well about. Well,the "old" Stephen L Carter has returned to us with his new novel, "The Impeachment of Abraham Lincoln".

"Impeachment" takes an alternative history view of Abraham Lincoln's last years in office. Carter begins his book with Lincoln surviving the assassination attempt at Ford's Theater. John Wilkes Booth and his co-conspirators are hunted down and most were killed before they could talk. Lincoln continues as president, though in Carter's story, VP Andrew Johnson is killed and William Seward is so badly injured that he never leaves his home. Lincoln, therefore, carries on with the Reconstruction of the South. He wants to be relatively gentle on the returning Confederates and not impose the harsh citizenship and economic penalties that were actually meted out under Andrew Johnson. But Abraham Lincoln has as many enemies post war as he had during the war and opponents get together to bring a bill of impeachment against Lincoln. The president was impeached by the US House of Representatives and the trial will be heard and judged by the US Senate.

Lincoln has hired the law firm of Dennard & McShane to defend him in front of the Senate. He doesn't appear at his own trial, but works with the lawyers who are defending him. One of the newly hired law clerks at the firm is 21 year old, Abigail Canner. Recently graduated from Oberlin College, she turns up at the firm with a letter from partner Dennard, promising her a place as a law clerk, on the recommendation of an Oberlin professor. But not only is Abigail Canner a woman, she is also black - a member of what Carter always refers to as "the darker nation". (Carter uses this term in his first three novels, too.) Abigail works her way onto the team defending the president, but is often on the outside looking in at the actual day-by-day work. So she begins working on her own, trying to piece together the importance of some murders, some spy reports, and other out-of-place happenings in "Washington City" that are connected with the on-going impeachment trial. She is also attracted to a fellow law-clerk, the wealthy, white Jonathan Hilliman.

Abigail Canner is the daughter of the middle-class black community of Washington DC. She's been well-educated and is a beauty. She wants to be a lawyer and, by god, she will be. Her determination to get ahead is part of her charm to the many - both black and white - who meet her. And Abigail is only one of Carter's many well-drawn characters in his book. There are no caricatures, and the plot is well-paced. Heavy on law, Carter does a good job, a really good job, at explaining the law to the reader.

But the important thing about Stephen Carter's new novel is that he's back to his original form. For the Carter fans, a long wait is over. "The Impeachment of Abraham Lincoln" is another well-written novel.
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34 of 38 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars A sprawling novel that tries to cover too many bases, June 12, 2012
By 
rgregg (Marina Del Rey, CA) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: The Impeachment of Abraham Lincoln (Hardcover)
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Stephen Carter is a prolific writer who is known for his complex and detailed fiction such as "The Emperor of Ocean Park".
In "the Impeachment of Abraham Lincoln", he has taken on the task of writing a "what if" historical story with an intriguing premise.
What if Lincoln survived the attempt on his life by John Wilkes Booth? Carter has taken Lincoln to 1867 where he finds himself facing impeachment in the Senate for some of his actions after the Civil War in order to do what he felt was needed to stabilize the country.
The fascinating main character in this book is not Lincoln but a young black woman named Abigail Canner. She is a recent college graduate who is taking on a job as a law clerk at the law office of the firm who is responsible for defending the President.
Canner makes for a solid lead in this book as her feisty attitude, knowledge of the law, and determination to succeed is vital to the role she is about to play at the law firm. Her skin color is a key attribute in the novel and it both helps her and hurts her in various ways in post Civil War USA.
This is not simply a story of the impeachment trial. It covers many bases. Carter throws in a murder mystery, an examination of the social mores existing in Washington after the war, conspiracy theories, race relations, and political divides.
When one member of the defense team is found dead along with a supposed prostitute, Canner refuses to accept both the conclusions of the police and the relationship between the two murder victims. Her investigation into that issue is an interesting part of the book.
Canner finds herself torn between advancing her career, romantic sparks between herself and another member of the law firm and the prejudices of members of her own family and others.
This book is well over 500 pages and covers an enormous amount of ground in getting to and through the actual trial of the President.
The story had a few problems for me. Carter is a law professor and uses that knowledge along with his obvious awareness of history to put together a big piece of fiction. And the law as applied both in the late 19th Century as well as the complications of an impeachment trial are a bit too much for the average reader to absorb.
As the story is a fictional description of the era, he uses both real and fictional characters to tell his story. If any book required a list of characters at the beginning, this is one. The law firm itself is full to the brim with key players. The many members of high society who are vital to the story are too numerous to mention. Canner's own family and friends who have critical roles to the outcome (no spoiler here) are many.
You throw in Lincoln's cabinet, his own advisers, the complete array of Senators and you have nearly 100 key people. There are many other characters who play a role in either defending Lincoln's decisions or seem to be conspiring against him for his actions. Many times I would have liked to refer to a list in order to remind me who's who.
Carter also portrays Lincoln as someone who likes to tell rambling stories to others and there are a few too many of those rambles for me.
So this combination history story, trial novel, mystery tale, defining of race after the Civil War, family story, society examination and political piece fails to come together completely for me. Not because the concept is bad or many of the people in the story aren't fascinating. Simply because Carter tries to pack too much story into too many pages. If he had cut back a little on the trial detail or the views of so many privileged people in the District of Columbia, he might have been able to focus in on fewer elements and kept me more involved in the book. The best part of this book for me was the logic behind Lincoln's decision process and the evolution of race relationships post Civil War.
And I do compliment Carter on an amazing final twist that he throws in for the reader near the end of this epic.
Others may feel that the elements mentioned are truly the base of his novel. And I wouldn't fault anyone for feeling that way but it just didn't come together for me. As much as I wanted to love this book, I left with a lot of like and a bit of disappointment at what might have been. A "what if" for me!
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20 of 22 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A fascinating alternate history. Carter is at the top of his game, June 13, 2012
This review is from: The Impeachment of Abraham Lincoln (Hardcover)
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What if the president survived the assassination attempt, only to face an impeachment trial two years later? That's the premise of this stout, absorbing tale. But Carter, with an almost mesmerizing touch, weaves more than a "what if" story here. What most engaged me is the way that Carter liberated himself from any stilted, biased or passive political ranting of his own. Instead of telegraphing his views into the characters, he allowed history to inform us, while never forgetting to hook us with an invented story within the framework of an intense and complex time in history.

In 1867, the war has been over for two years. Andrew Johnson, not Abe Lincoln, was shot and killed by Booth. And Secretary of State William Seward has been so wounded that he doesn't leave his house anymore. And the president's wife has died a year ago from a mysterious accident. This is the alternate history that Carter has meticulously woven together. Lincoln faces an impeachment trial from Congress on four counts due to his policies (or lack thereof) and intercessions (or lack thereof) during Reconstruction: 1) suspension of habeas corpus, 2) seizing of telegrams and shuttering a handful of newspapers 3) not sufficiently protecting the freedmen in the southern states 4) conspiring with the military officers to overthrow the constitutional forms of government.

This finely nuanced and well-paced novel is packed with fully realized characters and situations. Of course, with a cast this extensive, and numerous plots within plots, some characters are there to lend background and color, or to promote a larger connection. There are plots and subplots, romance, adventure, conspiracies, and even murder. How Carter tightly brings it all together in this capacious novel is superbly tight, with room for ambiguity, and he always remains a step ahead of the reader. Half of the fun was trying to catch up and tease out the disclosures before he did!

Abigail Canner is a twenty-one-year-old black graduate from Oberlin who lives with her aunt, a freed slave named Nanny Pork, in Washington City. She aspires to become a lawyer, and shrewdly procures a job as a clerk in the law office that represents Lincoln. It is a win-win, too, because the personnel know it looks good to practice what they preach. All too often, it is known that "like so many people of liberal persuasion, they value their own progressive opinions more than they value the people they hold those opinions about."

Abigail is the polestar of this book, and Carter has drawn her with an able and agile hand. Whatever a reader might fear could occur with a character like Abigail--such as too much PC, or implausibly heroic--those fears will be allayed by the subtle sharpness of Miss Canner. Yes, there's romance in the air, and it doesn't take the reader long to foresee its possibility, but Carter wins you over with his credible storyline and keen restraint. And, not all is as doubtless (or doubtful!) as it may initially seem.

The book was like a web, or a circle with vectors projecting in every direction. As the author demonstrates, there are no easy answers, and often, both sides imbibe elements of hypocrisy and criminal behaviors, as well as righteousness and nobility. At this time, during the impeachment proceedings, Lincoln states that he would be ready to step down, but doesn't feel that his work is finished until he brings the Union together. The radical Republicans--who are men of his own party who could be seen, on the one hand, as fanatical, or on the other, as dedicated and true--want to oust him now.

I was concerned that the story would be clumsy, with a ham-handed Lincoln and a heavy-handed story. It has to be difficult to portray an icon known as "Honest Abe," two years beyond his actual survival time, a president most known for freeing the slaves. But this isn't just the Lincoln we learned about in our history textbooks in high school. Here we have a troubled, complicated man, always at the ready with an amusing anecdote, a sometimes dour but witty and enigmatic presence. And a flawed human being who nevertheless understands the times he is facing.

There is nothing black and white in this racially charged novel of American history. Besides the conflict of race, there are the businessmen with greedy propositions about tariffs; egos; political ambitions; social issues of women and class; and more.

"The cost of war," says Lincoln in 1867, " is impossible to estimate in advance...wars continue long after one side surrenders. Every conflict plagues the peace that follows it."

"There is a tradition," says retired Union General Dan Sickles, one of Lincoln's staunchest supporters, "that once a great war has been won, the leader must at once be deposed. The Romans used to do it. The British, too."

In the Author's Note, a must-read at the end of the book, Carter provides important information regarding his source material, and a fascinating peek at how he braided fact and fiction together. Like his first novel, THE EMPEROR OF OCEAN PARK, he slyly evinces the skullduggery in the chess games of politics, as well as the toll of personal loss to the cause and commitment of justice. Moreover, he doesn't forget that his story is, principally, to entertain, and seduce his readers into believers. He makes the most of his characters and their individual and shared passions, and renders a deeply felt and plausible history, back to the future.
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20 of 23 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Horrible, implausible writing in the disguise of alternative history., January 20, 2013
By 
Kristan O. Overstreet (Livingston, TX United States) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: The Impeachment of Abraham Lincoln (Hardcover)
When you pick up a book entitled "The Impeachment of Abraham Lincoln," it's natural to presume that the book is about an Abe Lincoln who lives to be impeached. You would, quite naturally, also assume that you would get a clear and concise explanation of the reasons why the impeachment took place, the principal players in the drama, and the impeachment proceedings itself.

Well... no. At best you get one out of the three- the proceedings and arguments, at least when the main characters can be bothered to attend the impeachment trial on the Senate floor.

The book is, in reality, a convoluted and unconvincing murder mystery, featuring conspiracies too confusing and inexplicable to be believed. The main character is a well-off free black woman with a college degree- which already overstretches the bounds of probability for 1867- who seeks to become a lawyer at a prestigious Washington law firm... at a time when there were only a handful of black lawyers in the whole nation, and no female lawyers whatever! The character by herself is so improbable that the author has to make repeated efforts to justify her existence- NOT a sign of good writing. Tack on to that an interracial romance or two... in the Reconstruction era... well, good-bye, credibility.

The reader is dropped straight into the impeachment crisis with absolutely no lead-in other than, "Lincoln took a bullet to the head from Booth and was up and about again in four days, yay Lincoln!" When looking for historical figures to gain a frame of reference, the reader is almost always disappointed: all but one or two of the principals are one-dimensional cardboard cutouts with all the personality of a theater lobby standie. (The principal exceptions are lawyer and former general Daniel Sickles and ruthless socialite Kate Chase Sprague, who manage to achieve a whole two dimensions each.) Lincoln barely appears himself at all; he is left as a mysterious, vague presence who the other characters map their own prejudices and hopes upon.

The plot wanders like a drunkard, the cast expands to gargantuan size, the contrivances grow less believable with every page... and the plot ends, quite frankly, on a cop-out. The kindest word that can be applied to this work is "ambitious," but it is ambition with the skill to back it up.

I checked my copy out from a local library, and I'm exceedingly glad I didn't lose any money on this unreadable mess. Hopefully some less ambitious or more skilled author will take the same title for a more focused book, either drama or alternate history. The title is interesting; the book behind it, everything but.
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13 of 15 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Yay! A lawyer who can write a ripping yarn!, June 27, 2012
This review is from: The Impeachment of Abraham Lincoln (Hardcover)
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I'll admit it, I didn't fully read the blurb on the back when I ordered this book. I saw it was written by a law professor from Yale, so as a lawyer and erstwhile teacher of American History I was already interested in giving the book a shot.

Imagine my surprise when I was reading the first pages and references were made to Lincoln still being alive after the assassination and that Seward and Johnson had also been wounded. Then I read the blurb and was thrilled to realize this was actually an alternate history and that I HADN'T lost my marbles and forgotten everything I knew about the Civil War.

Anyhow, this book will grab you quickly and not let you go. I absolutely love Carter's style of writing. He is heavy on the legal aspects, but still manages to keep the book interesting and accessible (unlike much of the legal writing you are forced to read in law school!). The characters are well-developed and Carter does a great job of creating an alternate history but still maintaining the feel of the era. As an historian I find anachronisms in historical fantasy novels really jangle my nerves and make suspension of disbelief difficult to maintain. I never experienced that jangling while reading this book.

I have certainly wondered many times what would have happened if Lincoln had survived and what his approach to reconstructing the nation would have been. I think Carter has created not only an entertaining novel, but one that has raised questions for me to ponder for some time to come. I highly recommend this book if you have always been intrigued by the Civil War and the mammoth personalities of that era.
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9 of 10 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars An A+ For Anachronism or Alternative History At Its Worse, August 9, 2012
By 
C. Ellen Connally (Cleveland, Ohio USA) - See all my reviews
This review is from: The Impeachment of Abraham Lincoln (Hardcover)
Anachronism is a noun meaning the representation of an event, person or thing in a historical context in which it could not have occurred or existed - a person or thing that belongs in another time, i.e, a cave man with a cell phone. If you saw the Lincoln vampire movie, Lincoln's fictional life long friend - who happens to be black - and hangs out at the White House with the President would be a good example.

Steven's Carter's youthful protagonist Abigail Canner in THE IMPEACHMENT OF ABRAHAM LINCOLN fits right into the mold. A African American graduate of Oberlin College, Abigail manages to do things that white women and black men could hardly have done 100 years later. After getting a job as a maid/law clerk in a Washington law firm - not just any law firm but the one that is representing the President in his impeachment trial - she manages to integrate restaurants, trains and hotels, openly dates white men, manages to know modern day techniques for arson investigations and within a few months of reading law books at night knows the intricacies of just about every aspect of the law - including the dreaded hearsay rule of evidence. Her super status allows her to meet with the President, sit in the blacony at the Senate during the impeachment trial, knock on the front doors of prominent white people - and be admitted - all with no problems.

She is highly insulted when she is not invited to high level conferences over trial strategy. Aside from her color and sex, its unlikely that a law clerk who has studied law for a few months or a junior associate in a firm would have had such expectations, then or now. But Abigail did! Maybe Carter should hae just given her a superwoman cape and let her go into a phone booth in front of the White House and change clothes every once in a while.

If you think I'm being hard on the author, lets deal with a little reality. At the 1881 Inaugural Ball for President James A. Garfield, a black couple went out onto the floor to dance. Every other couple - all of whom were Republicans - not the racist Southern Democrats - walked off the floor and refused to dance. In 1901 when President Theodore Roosevelt invited Booker T. Washington to a meal at the White House it became a national senation and not in the positive sense. BTW, legend has it that TR started referring to the Executive Mansion as the White House after that to send the message that it was in fact reserved for whites.

Woodrow Wilson watched BIRTH OF A NATION at the White House and thought it was the greatest.

It was not until 1948 that a black man served as a law clerk for the United States Supreme Court. When William T. Coleman left the Court and obtained a job at a Washington law firm all of the secretaries threatened to quit because they would not work in the same office as a black man. The threats of the firm's most prominent and liberal minded client to take his business else where stopped the dissent and Coleman kept his job. The history is not pretty, but that's the way it was.

But yet the able Abigail manages to demonstsrate her uncanny knowledge of the law while also playing the master dectitive who solves one of Carter's usual convoluted plots that includes sub plots on top of sub plots and characters on top of characters along with his usual 200 or so extra pages of verbiage that add little to the story. You won't believe the contrived ending - that is if you got past the contrived beginning that sees Lincoln - like Christ - rise on Easter Sunday and survive Booth's shot to the head. And of course Carter reiterates his usual theme - ad nauseam - that there was a black middle class that lived about the fray of segregated American in the 19th century.

As a black woman and a lawyer and direct descendant of the same class of the black middle class that Carter writes about, I found Abigail so far from reality that it ruined the entire story not to mention the historical inaccuracies.

After plowing through THE EMPEROR OF OCEAN PARK (which I only managed to do by listening to all 28 hours on tape) I vowed that I would never ever undertake another Steve Carter book. But I weakened with the publication of THE IMPEACHMENT because of my interest in the period and the subject matter. I should have followed my intuition and waited for this master of anachronism to be to the $1.98 sale table or the "free bookstore" aka the public library. Alternative history can be made interesting but it must also have some semblance of reality. Carter's IMPEACHMENT.... has neither.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars A for Effort. A+ for alternate history. C for keeping my interest., August 11, 2012
This review is from: The Impeachment of Abraham Lincoln (Hardcover)
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I love LOVE alternate history. There are so many big irresistible WHAT IFs. And perhaps none so profound, for American history, as "What if Lincoln had survived his assassination?"

Stephen Carter does an admirable job, truly extraordinary, at telling what might have happened if Lincoln lived, Seward became a recluse after a steep decline (he was stabbed in the face in "real" history), and vice president Andrew Johnson was killed (in our history, another conspirator was supposed to assassinate Johnson but lost his nerve). In particular, Carter posits, Lincoln likely would have been impeached because -- among other things, he DID suspend habeus corpus, he DID place northern cities under martial law, and he DID take money from the Treasury without legislative approval to help private citizens buy weapons. The novel tells of the alternate history of the impeachment, from the viewpoint of the lawyers asked to defend Lincoln -- led by a plucky and brilliant black woman, Abagail Canner, just hired as a law clerk.

When I started reading The Impeachment of Abraham Lincoln, I exclaimed about its wonderfulness. For a quarter of the novel, I couldn't tear myself away. The characters -- by circumstance and setting, not the least of which is the social mores of upper-class Washington -- are fascinating. I believed in their setup, and I wanted to know more about them.

But Carter's detailed "history" and the incredible attention to law niceties got in the way of the storytelling, and I began to feel as though I ought to be taking notes for a history test or law exam in an alternate-universe college class. By the halfway point, I _could_ tear myself away, and I was lured by books that were easier to read after a hard day at work. I set the book aside for a few months, and this morning I skipped ahead to the last 50 pages -- just for the denouement. Which I liked quite a bit, while also feeling that I hadn't missed all that much plot by skipping 100-or-so pages.

If you're heavily into the history of the reconstruction era, I think you'd give this at least one more star than I did. If you love lawyer-fiction, ditto. For me... It was just a bit too heavy, the characters and plot moved too slowly, and I kept feeling, "Get to the point already!" I never felt as though I connected with Abigail; the storytelling was reporting rather than who-she-is.

I wanted to love this book more than I did, really. But it couldn't hold me. I wish it had.
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16 of 20 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars A good political thriller., June 17, 2012
This review is from: The Impeachment of Abraham Lincoln (Hardcover)
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A young Black woman joins a Washington law firm as a clerk. The firm is defending the impeached President of the United States.
The impeachment based on policy disputes and who controls the government. A faction in Congress has determined to replace the President with a person who will accept their direction.
One of the firm's partners is murdered in the company of a prostitute. Earlier that day, the partner had withdrawn a large sum of money from his bank account, the money is missing.
The woman's sister may be involved. Working with a White male clerk, they are pulled deeper and deeper into...

This could be a good contemporary political thriller. The author draws good characters and has a reasonable plot.
The story has a good pace and is very readable. The less history the reader knows, the more enjoyable the book will be.
Good historical fiction needs to stay within the restrictions of the time. The author needs to understand the historical characters and keep them within realistic activities. The author is unable to do this and it destroyed the book for me.

Errors, both minor and major abound.

Lincoln and Sickles were not "life long friends". Lincoln rewarded an important war-Democrat from New York for supporting the war.

In 1867, Paul Morphy traveled to Paris by war of Cuba. He would not have been in DC during the winter.
His mind was starting to fail even if he still has several years ahead of him.

Impeaching Lincoln would not have been as easy as depicted. Grant and Sherman would have stood with Lincoln against the radicals.
Longstreet, D. H. Hill, John Mosby and possibly Robert E. Lee could have helped stop impeachment in the South.
Thousands of Union veterans would have made the next election "difficult" for any House member voting to impeach him.
I agree that Lincoln and the Radicals would have had a bitter fight but do not agree the Radicals could have impeached him.

This is a good political thriller but it is NOT historical fiction.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars So disappointed..., August 21, 2012
This review is from: The Impeachment of Abraham Lincoln (Hardcover)
i had read this author's book, the emperor of ocean park, which i liked very much. so i was eager to read this book and the subject matter interested me strongly. at first, i was quite taken with the book, but then...but then. the book just dragged on and on, and i had no idea what the main characters were thinking or feeling; there just was no reality to them; they were like doll figures going through motions. the legal descriptions got very wordy and lengthy and there seemed to be so much repetition. i feel horrible that i don't like the book (i have about 30 pages to go before finishing it; i am just unable to pick it up each time and read more of it) because i wanted to so much. but i don't. and i don't think it was very well written. there are strange changes of point of view and of the author's voice intruding into the narration and then sometimes i wasn't sure whose voice it was that was telling the story. i think if you love the subject matter, love books with lengthly legal descriptions and actions in them (without the drama), then you might want to try this book. otherwise, i would pass. personally, i am sorry i wasted my time with it.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars But sadly 150 pages or so too long, June 4, 2012
This review is from: The Impeachment of Abraham Lincoln (Hardcover)
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This was a great story about something that many of us have taken a moment to wonder.
What if is something that comes up in many discussions of any historical event. What
if is taken to a whole new level in this fascinating story of what happened when Lincoln
survived Booth's bullet.

Many of the cast of characters here are fairly well known by anyone who has ever sat in
a United States History class, even if it were as far back as elementary school. The cast
is the same, but the character of the cast is what is in question through much of the book.
Who is on Lincoln's side and who exactly, is not. From the first pages of the story this is
the question to which his legal team is seeking the answer. Who can be trusted.

The personality of Lincoln himself is portrayed as we have all come to think of him. A down
home sort of gentle man possessed of wisdom and good humor. In fact, it was some of those
slightly humorous yarns that kept me reading through some of the spiritless and extremely
dull dialogue that was at times repetitive and in my opinion often boring and redundant. I think
the story, which was excellent would have been well served by some enthusiastic editing.

The question for me when it comes to a book where the words seem disproportionate to the story is
always, was it worth it. In this case, I would say yes. Yes, because the Abigail Canner and Jonathan
Hilliman were eminently likable. Some of the villains were equally peevish and surly. The most difficult
parts to endure were the courtroom/ Senate scenes which seemed to go on forever and give little back
for the effort spent.

This is a story that is well told, if in too verbose a manner.
Recommended.
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The Impeachment of Abraham Lincoln by Stephen L. Carter (Hardcover - July 10, 2012)
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