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  • Impossible PRD2783 Color Film for Polaroid Sx-70 Cameras
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Impossible PRD2783 Color Film for Polaroid Sx-70 Cameras

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Price: $23.49 & FREE Shipping on orders over $35. Details
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  • 8 exposures per pack
  • Color instant film for Polaroid SX-70-type cameras
  • Development: 30 minutes approximately at 70 (21 )
  • Image area: 3.1 x 3.1 in (7.9 x 7.9 cm)
  • Finish: Glossy
29 new from $23.49

Frequently Bought Together

Impossible PRD2783 Color Film for Polaroid Sx-70 Cameras + Impossible PRD2784 Black and White Film for Polaroid Sx-70 Cameras (Black/White) + Impossible PRD3058 Black and White Film for Polaroid SX-70 Cameras (Black)
Price for all three: $70.47

Buy the selected items together

Product Details

  • Product Dimensions: 4.6 x 3.8 x 0.6 inches ; 3.8 ounces
  • Shipping Weight: 4 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Shipping: This item is also available for shipping to select countries outside the U.S.
  • ASIN: B00FMSZAOQ
  • Item model number: PRD2783
  • Average Customer Review: 2.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (30 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #208 in Camera & Photo (See Top 100 in Camera & Photo)
  • Date first available at Amazon.com: December 23, 2013

Product Description

Color instant film for Polaroid SX-70-type cameras. Thanks to an innovative color protection formula, this film boasts great color saturation, a high level of detail and sharpness, and stunning image quality.

Customer Reviews

More wasted film and money.
GREGORY G. STANGAL
It is a bizarre combination of blues greens and blacks.
blah
NOTE: Polaroid cameras do not need batteries.
P. Phan

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

46 of 46 people found the following review helpful By P. Phan on January 30, 2014
Verified Purchase
Impossible, this (still) is not. This is perhaps Impossible's third (and latest) formula, and although there are some minor improvements, it is still very fickle. Don't get me wrong, though-- in terms of price and reliability, Impossible's film is a much better alternative than buying old Polaroid film. Overall, Impossible still has a long way to go until their film can be considered objectively (rather than relatively) good. As always, keep these extremely important tips in mind:

- SET YOUR EXPOSURE DIAL: Start your SX-70's exposure dial from the darkest setting, and work your way up. I've never had to go past the middle point, actually. You will probably never have to set the dial to the brightest setting. Indoors, darkest/ second-darkest (with flash) did the trick, while outside in the day it was anywhere from second darkest to least dark. Not sure yet about night shots.

- SHIELD YOUR POLAROIDS: Immediately turn your camera upside down the moment it spits the camera out, or shield your hand over it, or install the Impossible Frog Tongue. Any light hitting the picture in its first few minutes may dramatically affect the exposure.

- DEVELOP PROPERLY: Polaroids should develop face-down in a dark, warm place (the darkness is the most important part, warmth is optional but helpful.), NEVER in direct sunlight or lamp-light. DO NOT SHAKE THEM! These babies take about half an hour to even start taking shape, and an hour to fully develop. Keep it face-down that whole time!

Warmth eliminates a slight blue tinge. It won't be so dramatic that your friend will comment "Wow, this picture is blue!" But there will be a slight blue filter look to it.
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Shawn Ramirez on July 29, 2014
Verified Purchase
Remember even expired film still works... depending on how many years. I shot my first box of this film about a year ago and the images were horrid. I shoot it now and the images are far better. Keep an eye on your exposure comp dial (turning to dark will make it dark, turning to light will make it light) so remember your lighting. The film is about ISO 150, camera is a f/8 and has a shutter speed range from 1/175s to more than 10 seconds. So shooting indoors may not work to well considering the mirror slap and any shaking from the user.

Now some people complain that the price is to much and I have to kind of agree. But I also try to remember that I'm paying for batteries, ink and developing.

Don't shake the film when developing, the film develops slooooooow. Put it face down in a dark bag and leave it there, light will effect its developing. You have to learn its ways and how to work with it. This isn't a perfect camera with perfect film. It's old, it has character... it has soul.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By KMacNeil on August 27, 2014
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This batch of the SX-70 film works great. I love the range of colors and it works wonderfully with my SX-70 Land Camera. My only real complaint is that it takes so long to develop (an hour to an hour and a half). It's also incredibly temperature sensitive (like all Impossible Film), which makes it pretty difficult to shoot in a hot climate.

Some general tips for using this film:
- Ideally, shoot and develop your film at room temp (70-80 degrees).
- If you're shooting outside on a hot day, try keeping a cooler with you, or leave your film in an air-conditioned car. Too much heat will make your shots appear yellow and over-exposed.
- If you're shooting outside on a cold day, immediately press the film to your body or put it in a warm pocket, etc. Cold film tends to come out blue/green.
- Expect it to take a while to develop. When the blue coating dissolves, it's finished.
- The date on the box is the production date. It's recommended you use the film within a year of that date. Note, this is NOT the expiration date. The film "expires" a year after the date printed on the box.
- The film is sensitive to light as it develops, so shield it ASAP. I usually put mine back in the box the film came in, and keep it closed in my purse (or pocket, or bag).

Happy shooting!
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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Stacey G. Lloyd on April 4, 2014
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It is very slow to develop (more so than I remember for Polaroid film), but there aren't many other choices.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Kregg on August 30, 2014
I'm shooting with a vintage mint condition SX-70 and I've not had an undeveloped print yet, but the Impossible film isn't nearly as good as the Polaroid film, and you need to be aware of this going in. I prefer to use expired Polaroid film as you end up with a 70's look to your photos, but there's no guarantee that expired film will work. The reality is that the expired Polaroid film that works today, won't be working tomorrow. What Impossible has done is truly impossible, and if they lower the price point, which hovers close to the cost of expired film, then I wouldn't hesitate to give this film 5 stars.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By DZiem on November 17, 2014
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There really is no other option out there for a vintage polaroid camera. There is barely any "color" - it's mostly different shades of pale brown. However, the product is just as described - you get polaroids from the photo. Sure, they aren't high quality, pretty, or even the right color; but this is probably all we photo buffs can get. The instructions are very clear and the film useable.
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