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8 of 9 people found the following review helpful
on October 28, 2012
My mother used to say, "Curiosity killed the cat." I was a curious child and an even more inquisitive adult - so reading "Impossible Realities" was like the best sugar high I've ever experienced because there was no crash. Only the anticipation one feels prior to embarking on a journey filled with possibility.

"Impossible Realities" is a compilation of scientific data, anecdotes and the personal experiences of Maureen Caudill, who spent fifteen years researching artificial intelligence and neural networks. If that sounds very "techie", let me assure you, this book is written in a style everyone can understand. It's a fascinating and eye-opening study of the science behind psychic and paranormal activity. If you are a skeptic, you'll find the research substantial enough to reconsider your views. If you are a believer, you'll rejoice in the validation. And if you're a student, you'll find a wealth of information from which to learn and study.

Maureen has compiled a thought provoking blend of information to support the existence of eight areas of psychic/paranormal activity: psychokinesis, remote viewing, energy healing, telepathy, animal telepathy, precognition, afterlife and reincarnation. I'm sure some of you are saying, "Hogwash!" And that's fine. Diversity of thought and action is what makes our world more interesting. However, I challenge you to read this book with an open mind and consider the possibility that these powers might exist.

The introduction tells a simple story about a village who believes swans are always white. And because no one had ever seen a swan of another color, a theory was born that all swans are white. The villagers accepted this as law. It was taught in their schools and never questioned until one day a little girl asked her teacher. "What if they're NOT all white?" The teacher was shocked. How could this little girl be so impudent as to challenge what everyone knew to be the truth? She was duly punished. But years later, long after the little girl had reached adulthood, she was near a pond and heard a loud honking. Parting the reeds, she peered across the water and saw a black swan. The villagers would not believe her but it didn't matter. She knew in her heart the theory that all swans were white was wrong. She'd seen it with her own eyes.

The moral of the fable is this: it only takes one person's confirmation to prove the theory incorrect.

There are a lot of people who choose to believe psychic phenomena is a hoax, fake, an impossibility. Maureen admits to being one of those doubters at one point. But when scientific research, as well as her own experiences, proved certain theories wrong, like psychokinesis, she began to look at psychic and paranormal activity differently. "Impossible Realities" takes the reader on a journey into another realm where the impossible is possible...and then offers the proof.

I love this book so much, I'm now on my second reading.
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11 of 14 people found the following review helpful
on November 25, 2012
I heard Maureen Caudill on "Coast to Coast" promoting her book and got the Kindle version. I had long wondered about "psi energy" metal bending, as Uri Geller bent a door key as it lay in my palm by simply putting his finger on it. I met Uri in the lab of Dr. Thelma Moss at UCLA as I was invited there for a Kirlian photography demo being the West Coast Editor of Popular Photography, POP, at that time. Geller had been trashed by another editor at POP and was eager to prove to me he was not a fraud. Between the bent key and the remote viewing I am convinced he is authentic.

A few days later he called me from New York City and perfectly described the room in which I was sitting, including the swimming pool outside! He wrongly included a table that had been removed three weeks before and this was to be an important clue to the nature of the phenomenon.

Maureen's book is a disappointment as it needs an editor in spite of one credited. Regardless declaring how easy it is to bend flatware on "Coast to Coast" and in her book, no instructions are given and it remains beyond me. Miss Caudill does not answer inquiries with regard to this technique, which is behavior below the standard for responsible authors.

Ms. Caudill fails to define terms; uses "scientific data" and "evidence." There are no such "scientific" anythings and this is shocking for someone trained in physics plus an editor not seeing said flaws, but the book has value.

She reviewed many "psi energy" studies in spite of refusing to use the label. "Psi" is the 26th letter of the Greek alphabet, looks like a three pronged pitchfork, symbolizes the mysterious "energy" of psychic metal benders, healers and mediums, but not Maureen Caudill. To her it is just "energy." So much for "science."

Meanwhile, it has been discovered the speed of light has been slowing and certainly since the "Big Bang!" Data from changes in moon transit intervals of Jupiter recorded since 1700 are now thought accurate. Reversing the curve says the speed of light was 10^10th times greater than now at the Big Bang. Or, "It approached infinity." When a physicist says "infinity" or "zero" he is saying, "You can't get there from here."

Energy is transferred on sea waves, in sound waves and electromagnetic perturbations or "waves" in space. "Psi" energy may be a new spectrum, and form undetectable with our instruments.

The dilation of time is well documented by satellites. Subatomic particles that decay in a few microseconds standing still, last many more as they are accelerated to velocities approaching "c," the speed of light.

Theoretically time vanishes at infinite velocity! A dimension without time! And, it is thought to have been the case when all matter was in one place, crushed together in a single nucleon, form like a proton or neutron.

Nucleon's density is ten trillion times that of water. If Earth were that dense nothing could be more than a few atoms tall. Time would not exist. Is this from where "psi" energy comes and why it is elusive? Is it the reason Uri Geller "saw" a table in my pool room when it had been removed weeks before? Psi spans time?

"Impossible Realities" has flaws, but it is a start.

Adrian Vance
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
on December 30, 2012
Impossible Realities by Maureen Caudill is a more scientific approach to paranormal phenomena. The author comes from a very scientific background, so even discussing such topics seemed outlandish to her, until it started happening to her. If you are interested in learning more about spoon bending, telepathy, reincarnation, remote viewing, and much more - be sure to read this book!

Impossible Realities is the type of book that can be life changing. If you are unsure of the paranormal possibilities in our very own reality, this book could shock you into seeking out the truth for yourself, and finding some truly awesome things in the process.

The topics in the paranormal realm included are: psychokinesis, remote viewing, energy healing, telepathy, animal telepathy, precognition, survival after death, and reincarnation. Each one is discussed to explain what it is, and also gives anecdotal and empirical evidence of each.

My favorite portion was the one with animal telepathy. Anyone who has had animals in their life knows that they can communicate with you. They can tell you things with more than just their barks or meows. I also enjoyed the spoon bending chapter, I just wish the author had taught us how to do it, too.

I really like this book. I've read many paranormal books, and this one that offers more a scientific focus on it, which I can appreciate. Paranormal enthusiasts will be drawn to reading this book because it offers a different perspective on the topics than many of the other books on the topic provide readers with. Skeptics that actually read it, may end up questioning some of their previous "beliefs" about the paranormal field. So no matter if you are a skeptic or a die-hard believer of the paranormal, I think if you have an interest in this topic, you'll enjoy reading this book, too. I highly recommend it.

* Thank you to the publisher of Impossible Realities, Hampton Roads, for providing me with a copy of this book for review. All opinions expressed are my own.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
on December 27, 2012
I was hoping for more anecdotal evidence to serve as examples of the phenomena this book assures are truths. There is lots of explanation...but a shortage of instances wherein these phenomena manifested.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
I have just finished reading "Impossible Realities" and, if I have understood chapter 6 correctly, the effects of this caused me to read "Suddenly Psychic" several years ago... Apologies to those who have read neither book yet, but you have a treat in store. You will come across swans, time travel, cats, quantum mechanics, libellous scientists, dodgy knees that get healed over the phone, and yet more swans. Despite being intelligent with an academic bent, the author's sense of humour remains intact. Amazing.

I will get the gripe over quickly: I finished the Kindle version long before I realised - it told me I was at 60% of the book. There are pages and pages of citations and footnotes at the end, though the notes are funny and enlightening, so well worth reading. The author comes over as natural and her writing style is easy to follow, despite the footnotes and sometimes difficult concepts.

When I'd finished Impossible Realities, I looked at the back cover of Suddenly Psychic and found a similar description of the book I had just read, but without the swans. So what has changed in the intervening years?

The author has lost some of the wonder and awe at discovering "paranormal" phenomena. In Suddenly Psychic, she has a sense of amazement and incredulity at some of her own experiences, whereas in Impossible Realities, she not only believes them, she lives them daily. There is no longer a feeling of this scientist's world being turned on its head. Instead, you get a strong sense of frustration at the lack of money and progress, as well as the general denigration of this field of scientific study. This is not a lamentation of swans, however, as Maureen Caudill puts forward the theories and research of some eminent people in support of scientific study of these impossible realities.

If you already "get it" - the whole idea of being more than just a brain and body parts, and you believe that psychic phenomena require a measured explanation, then you will almost certainly enjoy Impossible Realities.

As with Suddenly Psychic, I had to re-read the section about quantum mechanics several times but I'm glad I read it as I feel closer to understanding why time's arrow works in both directions. Thanks to this book I have an explanation of and reason for precognition (the sixth black swan). In fact, if you need a 2-second head start over a lion you cannot see yet, then I'm your woman!
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
I like to think I'm a pretty open minded person, yet I have to admit this book covers things I'm not sure I can believe Part of me wants to believe the things in this book and to be honest I have met and know people, family members, who do believe and actually practice the things in this book.
With that said, I couldn't help but wonder why a woman with such a strong background in science would choose to believe in these things as well. Of course this is what the book tells us.
The book is very educational, especially if you are interested in this sort of phenomena. Each chapter takes on a different type of physic phenomena. I found the chapters on Energy Healing and Telempathy really interesting. To be honest I'd never even heard of telempathy before but out of all of them I get that one more than the others. Like Ms Caudill states many of these you kind of need to experience or see to believe Ms Caudill offers lots of scientific studies which were enlightening.
Yet even broken down with how the studies are run, the statics, and findings. After all the information given to me by this book. I'm still not sure if I can believe. I'm more knowledgeable and I feel that is something, but I don't feel the book gave definitive hard evidence. Even though that's what the back claims. Still it's ok, because I think for some people they need more than words they need to see and that's the only way they will belive. I do feel the book offers people one way to look at things we don't understand, and make there own choice. To me getting the information out there is half the battle.

How I got it: Received a copy from the author via Bewitching Book Tour.How I got it: Received a copy from the author via Bewitching Book Tour.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
Probably in your lifetime, science has told you one thing and years later they changed their mind. Coffee was bad for you, coffee was good for you. Cigarettes were good for you, cigarettes are bad for you. The list goes on and on. Some things will go back and forth over your lifetime. The author covers eight topics that science now says probably don't exist. I think it's funny, because science says that quantum entanglement exists, but telepathy, remote viewing and energy healing can't. Impossible realities covers topics of psychokinesis, remote viewing, energy healing, telepathy, animal telepathy, precognition, survival after death and reincarnation. If you've ever had anything happen to you in any of these fields, you will probably like the book. If you are a strict, you better be able to duplicate this in a lab scientist, you'll probably hate this book with gusto.
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5 of 7 people found the following review helpful
on October 9, 2012
This work reminds me of Galileo and the Pope. It is a loose thread which evemtually will unravel current concepts of reality. The curious will find it interesting, and serious seekers of truth will find it a valuable resource. But in a world where weather forecasters still talk about sunrise and sunset, where the Flat Earth Society was still going strong when Armstrong stepped on the moon, and Moses had to wander 40 years in the wilderness, do not expect this volume to make the New York Times Best Seller list. It will survive. The gist of it will worm its way through the wall of neatly-boxed and ribbon-tied thought packages because truth outs. Anyone who considers reading this should question whether they really want to know what is. Neurons will fire.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on December 7, 2012
Wanted to read this when I heard the author interviewed, but have not been able to get into it. Not sure why because I am interested in the subject, so must assume it's the writing.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on December 4, 2012
This book is so clearly written that I now understand so many psychic abilities that were a little fuzzy before. Ms. Caudill tells all in a hilarious narration of her own experiences (and surprises)--especially in the footnotes, which I usually ignore. Do NOT overlook the snickers in this one.

"Try it. You'll like it."
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