In All His Glory and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Qty:1
  • List Price: $29.00
  • Save: $7.30 (25%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
In stock but may require an extra 1-2 days to process.
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Used: Very Good | Details
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: While this book has been loved by someone else, they left it in great condition. Hurry and buy it before someone else does and take advantage of our FREE Super Saver Shipping!!!
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

In All His Glory: The Life and Times of William S. Paley and the Birth of Modern Broadcasting Paperback – November 5, 2002


See all 9 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
$21.70
$5.00 $1.07
Best%20Books%20of%202014
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Hero Quick Promo
Year-End Kindle Daily Deals
Load your library with great books for $2.99 or less each, today only. Learn more

Product Details

  • Paperback: 740 pages
  • Publisher: Random House Trade Paperbacks (November 5, 2002)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0812967763
  • ISBN-13: 978-0812967760
  • Product Dimensions: 6 x 1.5 x 9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 2.1 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (8 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,391,832 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

CBS television tycoon Paley is portrayed as a narcissist, womanizer and tyrannical father in this well-documented biography, which is packed with TV and radio anecdotes and high-level intrigue. According to PW , this "often unflattering but never malicious portrait . . . . tears away the layers of self-aggrandizing mythology Paley wove about himself." Photos.
Copyright 1991 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From Library Journal

Critics always claimed that former CBS Chairman William S. Paley's As it Happened ( LJ 3/15/79) wasn't how it happened. Here Smith, author of Up the Tube: Prime-Time TV and the Silverman Years ( LJ 7/81), offers an objective discussion of the creation of the "Tiffany Network." Paley, Smith asserts, was often resistant to change; newsman Edward R. Murrow and "power behind the throne" Frank Stanton may have molded the media company more than Paley did. Still, Smith also pays tribute to Paley's shrewd, strong personality, even though it sometimes resulted in megalomania and compulsive womanizing. With its mix of business reportage and gossip about a "brilliant circle" that included wife Babe, Truman Capote, Slim Keith, and David O. Selznick, this book should have wide appeal in public libraries. Previewed in Prepub Alert, LJ 7/90 as Paley: A Life. --Judy Quinn, "Library Journal"
Copyright 1990 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

3.9 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

13 of 13 people found the following review helpful By Slokes VINE VOICE on April 2, 2007
Format: Paperback
There was little in life William Paley wanted and didn't get, with the notable exception of a laudatory and readable biography. Sally Bedell Smith performed half that service with "In All His Glory," published the same year Paley died (1990); you will be hard-pressed to find as juicy a book on a hundred more engaging personalities.

Paley built a radio-television empire with CBS, "the Tiffany Network" known for its much-touted commitment to quality broadcasting. While acquiring markets and talents was Paley's contribution to CBS's glory, it was secondary by Bedell Smith's reckoning to his more material passions for lucre, women, and fame. He got most of what he wanted, but as we watch him on his deathbed, it's hard not to feel a Calvinistic twinge of regret for his limited vision.

"Bill Paley wanted every last minute from life," Bedell Smith writes.

It's about the most positive thing she has to say about Paley, who otherwise doesn't come off either as visionary or a leader. He failed to see the promise of innovations like television, color television, and the long-playing record, and had to be coaxed to letting his subordinates take up these and other ideas for building his empire. Then when they achieved success, Paley swooped in and took credit. "The convenient amnesia of the powerful," Bedell Smith calls it.

Where Paley excelled was in the art of interpersonal relations, which contributed to some major deals for CBS and very few lonely evenings for Paley himself, even if his wives couldn't say the same.

Bedell Smith writes an engaging story about Paley's years at CBS, but it is in recounting his social life where the book excels. Paley was born Jewish, and spent the rest of his life trying to pretend otherwise.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
8 of 8 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on July 26, 2003
Format: Paperback
This book has been out for as long as it has, and no reviews? It's been about five or six years since I've read it, but this volume is a must-read for anyone considering a career in broadcasting, or if you're interested in the building of a corporate empire.
The book takes us from Paley's somewhat well-to-do background and takes us, in all his glory, (which the book's author uses sarcastically), from cigar maker to the head of one of the most powerful corporations in American history, what used to be CBS, Inc.
The book doesn't necessarily portray Paley as a sympathetic character, but more of a small man who made it big. There's a heavy emphasis on the warts of the man, which may be somewhat understandable, since prior to this book's release, he was always presented as a man to be totally revered. But here he's portrayed as someone who likes to take credit for other's doings, as someone who plays petty head games with people such as Frank Stanton, and uses his on-air talent (Ed Murrow, for one) while it's convenient, and then when they're of no use to him anymore, casts them aside.
Despite the type of man Paley is presented as, this book is a very good chronicle of his career, which means it also is one of the definitive books on the creation of CBS. No matter what his personal flaws were, this is a man who did the impossible by challenging NBC to create the even more successful CBS radio network and then dominated television for roughly 20 years. The building of that empire with the "talent raids" of Amos 'n' Andy, Jack Benny, and others is vital reading for anyone who is in the broadcasting industry.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
13 of 15 people found the following review helpful By HeyJudy VINE VOICE on August 16, 2003
Format: Paperback
Author Sally Bedell Smith does her typically excellent job with IN ALL HIS GLORY, her biography of William Paley. Smith is known for her scholarship and her research, and it shows in this book.
Like many self-made successful people, Paley led an interesting life. Smith chronicles his original involvement with the nascent television industry as his interest grew into the empire he built surrounding CBS.
This is an important book for anyone interested in the development of that industry. As well, it is a fascinating peek into Paley's life. Here was a man who moved from the ghetto life of a child of 19th century European immigrants to becoming one of America's power elite. Once he was rich, he lived his life accordingly.
His journey makes for fascinating reading.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Mike B on December 22, 2011
Format: Paperback
This is a long (at slightly over 600 pages), but very readable expose of the life of CBS mogul William S. Paley. As the author states at the outset he was a very complicated man filled with contradictions.

We follow him as he raised CBS to be a nationwide radio enterprise and then make the transition to TV. In this Paley was less innovator and much more a juggling entrepreneur - listening too and balancing several ideas before finally taking the plunge. Inevitably, much to the annoyance of his business associates, he would usually take the credit for the success of various operations which were initiated by others. And woe to those who were even mildly involved in a less than successful business activity. Even if Paley was warned beforehand of the dubious nature of the project, he would search for, and blame, the necessary scapegoats.

Reading through the book can be at times like an episode of "Lifestyles of the Rich and Famous" with lists of jewellery, furniture and other luxurious items. There is much in this book on Paley's two wives, both of whom were entirely different. Frank Stanton, who was a dedicated President of CBS for over 25 years, was treated callously by Paley. The same could be said for William L. Shirer. Edward Murrow and Paley were great friends for a time, but this relationship too crumbled. Nothing lasted forever with Paley. He comes off as self-centered - unable to share the limelight with anyone. He was a collector - of enterprises, money, women and art. At the end of the book it was very hard to find the emotional heart of the man.

There are some things missing in this book. Paley's parents disappear from view once he is married to his first wife.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?