The Sopranos 6 Seasons 2004

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Season 5
Available on Prime
(473) IMDb 8.7/10
Available in HDAvailable on Prime

7. In Camelot TV-MA CC

His father's longtime goomar sheds light on some of Tony's lingering emotional and financial mysteries. Junior sees the upside of attending funerals, while Christopher sees the downside of enabling an A.A. friend's new addiction.

Starring:
James Gandolfini, Lorraine Bracco
Runtime:
55 minutes
Original air date:
April 18, 2004

Available in HD on supported devices.

In Camelot

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Season 5
Available on Prime

Customer Reviews

Great writing, great acting!
Ladybug
Carmine Sr. passes away, and his son Carmine Jr. and consiglieri Johnny Sack look to be headed to war; Tony wants no part of it.
Felix Felicis
I could sit and watch every night.
Bruce Taylor

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

53 of 59 people found the following review helpful By Jeffrey E Ellis on June 30, 2005
Format: DVD
The death of Carmine, family crime boss of New York, sets up the organizational tug of war that operates through the fifth season. The brutal push and shove between Little Carmine and Johnny Sack provides the dramatic backdrop as tensions mount between the families. Through it all, Tony tries to maintain neutrality but finds himself, as usual, in the thick of things.

On the home front there are several touching and poignant moment between our lovable thug, Tony, and his long-suffering wife, Carmella. Slowly and sweetly, they inch toward each other; each painfully aware of the sensitive issues and the deep divide which separate them. In a grimly amusing scene, Tony may have found Carmella's price.

Without question, this is Gandolfini's finest hour. He gives a performance which portrays not only the ruthlessness and thuggery of Tony Soprano but also the maturity, thoughtfulness, humor and depth of a caring husband father. No humanitarian awards just yet, though, this is brutal gangsterism and intimidation of innocents, after all. Carmella, Christopher, and Adriana also deliver their very best performances to date. Well-deserving of their awards and recognition.

Adriana's episode commentary in bonus features is worth listening to.
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19 of 21 people found the following review helpful By Felix Felicis on March 26, 2006
Format: DVD
The fifth season of The Sopranos was arguably the best since Season 1, with a few long running subplots from previous seasons resolved and new characters and problems added to mix, often in shockingly dramatic fashion. Here are capsules for each of the episodes in this fantastic season:

Episode 1 - "The Two Tonys" - As per last season's brilliant finale, "Whitecaps", Tony and Carmela are still on the outs. Carmela needs help dealing with AJ's attitude and also with a lumbering bear (metaphor alert) that is fond of their backyard but she refuses to ask Tony for assistance. Tony is working on taking his relationship with Dr. Melfi in a "new direction". Meanwhile, the NJ and NY families are excited that the "Class of '04" is being released from prison - Angelo Garepe and Phil Leotardo to NY and Feech La Manna and later Tony's cousin Tony Blundetto for NJ. Unfortunately, NY boss Carmine Sr. suffers a stroke and dampens the proceedings. A dense and involving first ep that also features a funny subplot between Paulie and Christopher.

Episode 2 - "The Rat Pack" - Jack Masserone is suddenly very chatty with Tony, and Tony wonders why. The painting that Masserone gave him may be a psychological giveaway. The FBI is turning the screws to Adriana, who almost gives away her secret at ladies night, but later finds a way to make it useful for her. Carmine Sr. passes away, and his son Carmine Jr. and consiglieri Johnny Sack look to be headed to war; Tony wants no part of it. Everyone rejoices as Tony B is released from prison, but what he wants now that he's out is to go straight. And Tony's not happy about it.

Episode 3 - "Where's Johnny?
Read more ›
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26 of 31 people found the following review helpful By E. Kutinsky on April 22, 2005
Format: DVD
At the end of season 5 of The Sopranos, when the bear himself wanders out of the woods and back into his house, you realize you've seen a season of television that should be unheard of. It had the action and violence to get the fans back who went wayward in season 4, sure, but what it REALLY has is the most astonishing depth of characters ever put on the small screen. The escalation of Adriana's story - from nearly weeping a confession in "The Rat Pack," to her suspicious car crash with Tony in "Irregular Around the Margins," to the unforgettable death that makes "Long Term Parking" one of the most unshakeable Sopranos hours ever proves that this show is nothing but a master at plotting - and at humanity. Drea de Mateo is so unforgettable, she should be the true hero of the season, but I'm afraid James Gandolfini has gone farther this season than in all the previous four combined. His scenes with Dr. Melfi have a renewed air of importance, and as the guilt over Tony B grows and grows, we're left with some of the most staggering truths about him we've yet to encounter. And the rest of the cast are no slouches either - Meadow's quiet manipulation of Finn to get her to propose to him ("Unidentified Black Males"), Carmela's moving affair/screw up ("Sentimental Education"), Christopher's bizarre collision of recovery and mobsterdom ("In Camelot"), Johnny Sack's arrogant takeover of the New York throne ("Where's Johnny), Junior's confrontation of strokes and death ("Where's Johnny"/"In Camelot"). And that dream? It all adds up to make season 5 the proof that the Sopranos seems to have rewritten all the rules for the small screen, and still knows how to break a few more. In short: 13 episodes of one masterpiece.
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23 of 27 people found the following review helpful By Michael McShea on April 24, 2005
Format: DVD
During a remarkable Season 5, we witness the complete breakdown of relationships among Tony Soprano's two families. We begin with a rudderless and lonely Tony facing his past demons, first with having to live inside the birthplace of all his inner termoil, his mother's house. He then has to confront the his past shortcomings as a member of his business orginizations. Whether it is the demise of a betraying lover, a bloody power struggle in NY, or the humbling return to a loveless marriage, Season 5 has left us with certain knowledge that no relationship on any level has been left intact and that Season 6 will prove to be a scramble to survive.
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