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In Defense of Miracles: A Comprehensive Case for God's Action in History Paperback – February 27, 1997


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 330 pages
  • Publisher: IVP Academic (February 27, 1997)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0830815287
  • ISBN-13: 978-0830815289
  • Product Dimensions: 5.5 x 1 x 8.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 15.2 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (14 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #468,993 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

R. Douglas Geivett is professor of philosophy at Talbot School of Theology, Biola University, in La Mirada, California. His previous books include Evil and the Evidence for God (Temple University Press) and (coedited with Brendan Sweetman) Contemporary Perspectives on Religious Epistemology (Oxford University Press).

Gary R. Habermas (Ph.D., Michigan State University) is Distinguished Research Professor and chair of the department of philosophy and theology at Liberty University in Lynchburg, Virginia. He is the author, coauthor or editor of twenty-seven books including Resurrected? An Atheist & Deist Dialogue (with A. Flew), The Case for the Resurrection of Jesus (with M. Licona), The Risen Jesus & Future Hope, The Resurrection: Heart of New Testament Doctrine and The Resurrection: Heart of the Christian Life.

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Customer Reviews

One of the best apologetic books I have read.
Discerning Reader
So, as a basic introduction to the philosophical problems of miracles, this is a great book.
John DePoe
Hard to go wrong in a book with contributions by the ones in this book.
Michael Hellum

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

21 of 22 people found the following review helpful By C. Price VINE VOICE on August 17, 2004
Format: Paperback
Aptly named "A Comprehensive Case," this book builds from the foundational issues and works its way up to the crowning miracle of Christendom -- the resurrection of Jesus. However, if you are looking for explorations of modern miracles or similar evidence, this is not the book you want.

It is to the editors credit that their first chapter is given to two who deny the possibility of miracles (and/or their detection). Taking David Hume's infamous chapter, "On Miracles," as the opening salvo, In Defense adequately sets the stage for the debate. Hume's arguments continue today in full force. They have by no means lost their influence. But lest you think these Christian apologists are setting up an outdated strawman, another section is given to contemporary atheist philosopher Anthony Flew to voice his comments on Hume as well as miracles.

With the opposition in place, four Christian writers begin making the philosophical case for the possibility that miracles exist and can be detected. A section on defining miracles is a welcome narrowing of the issue. Then Norman Geisler persuasively takes Hume and Flew head on and Francis Beckwith wrestles with the possibility of detecting miracles in history. The closing chapter in this section deals with "Recognizing a Miracle" and is also helpful in narrowing the issue.

The next set of chapters provides additional philosophical justification for believing in the possibility of miracles as well as their detection, including an aggressive assault on metaphysical naturalism by Ronald Nash and a brief argument for the existence of God. The main goal of this chapter is to establish the existence of a God who can and is inclined to act in human history. In other words, a God who does miracles.
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9 of 10 people found the following review helpful By John DePoe on December 19, 2005
Format: Paperback
A number of the best Evangelical philosophers have worked together to produce a fine series of essays on the philosophical issues of miracles. Undoubtedly the strongest feature of this book is that the reader will walk away knowing the most important issues that are in play in a philosophical analysis of miracles. Despite the fact that each author writes an essay on each issue, I found that most of them only begin to scratch the surface. For example, one essay is a defense of the existence of God and another is a refutation of naturalism, both of which by the limits of lengths of the essays will be unconvincing to those who are not already convinced the author is correct. Many of the other essays (though, not all of them) have this exact same problem. Of course, this does not mean these chapters of worthless. Rather, they merely are the initial framing of arguments and ideas that deserve further exploration and study. After getting a basic grip of the issues, readers can pursue further details in more depth in academic journals or book-length works. Be that as it is, this book is commendable for containing so much information in so little space. I know of no other book that covers so much ground in specifying what the basic philosophical issues are on miracles. Some of the work is a little too quick, but even when the articles have weak arguments, I think they lay out the crucial issues for the topic. So, as a basic introduction to the philosophical problems of miracles, this is a great book. But as a convincing case that some miracles have occurred, I suspect some people may rightfully judge that some of the arguments are specious.
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11 of 14 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on November 6, 1999
Format: Paperback
This is the finest presentation about the reality and possibility of miracles I have ever read. By miracles I do not mean your favorite football team pulling out a victory by a last second pass, or a near miss accident, or a remarkably quick healing of an illness. A real miracle is a violation or suspension of the natural laws of science. Some liberal theologians believe that God would be wrong to do this. Most agnostics and atheists as well as modernists do not believe in miracles at all. The miracles done by Jesus, as documented in the New Testament are often explained away by people with small faith and anti-supernatural agendas. For the rest of the review please visit it at CriticalReviews.com, an AMAZON Associate...
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7 of 9 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on November 26, 1997
Format: Paperback
The co-editors of "In Defense of Miracles" have brought together a team of relevant scholars to argue for the actuality of miracles and the historicity of God's work in the world as reported in the Bible. Not only do the authors set forth their case, but have also allowed for two well known critics of miracles, David Hume, and Anthony Flew, to state their case. This book will engage the reader in a critical review of the facts and assist one in having greater epistemic justification for their beliefs concerning miracles and their relevance in this world.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Steven H Propp TOP 100 REVIEWER on February 3, 2014
Format: Paperback
Gary Habermas (born 1950) is Professor of Apologetics and Philosophy and chairman of the department of philosophy and theology at Liberty University, and is a foremost evangelical apologist who has written many books such as The Case for the Resurrection of Jesus, The Historical Jesus: Ancient Evidence for the Life of Christ, Did Jesus Rise from the Dead?: The Resurrection Debate, Resurrected?: An Atheist and Theist Dialogue, Did the Resurrection Happen?], etc. R. Douglas Geivett is an associate professor of philosophy at Biola University, and has written/edited other books such as Contemporary Perspectives on Religious Epistemology and Faith, Film and Philosophy: Big Ideas on the Big Screen.

This 1997 book begins with "The Case Against Miracles," reprinting works by David Hume and Antony Flew. Following this are fifteen essays by writers such as Norman Geisler, William Lane Craig, J.P. Moreland, Robert C. Newman, etc., as well as Habermas and Geivett.
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