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4.7 out of 5 stars
In a Glass Grimmly
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8 of 9 people found the following review helpful
Format: Hardcover
I always enjoy when an author cleverly manages to retell some of my favorite childhood fairytales. In a Glass Grimmly offers a story where the fairytales are not only retold - they are creatively reinvented in a fresh, slightly creepy and definitely fun manner by Adam Gidwitz. Though definitely directed towards a younger audience, I firmly believe that this book can be just as entertaining for the older crowd, especially those of you who are like me and love fairytales.

This book is extremely hilarious to me, mostly because of Adam's writing style. Adam writes with a sense of humor that's both intelligent and relatable. I love how he would often step back from the actual events of the story to give a running commentary or a warning or even just his two cents - sometimes, those were the best parts on the page! Honestly, while reading In a Glass Grimmly, I was smiling or laughing at least 70% of the time.

And I love that he chose Jack and Jill to be his main characters. Because Jack and Jill are merely characters in an nursery rhyme that lasts for only a few lines, we only really get to hear about one incident in their lives (when they fall down the hill). I love how Adam's ingenuity shown as he chose them to headline this story. It was an interesting choice, and I'd personally consider it the correct one - since we don't know much about these two, there's so much left open to interpretation and imagination and Adam definitely makes use of that space. He believably weaves them into stories based on other fairytales and allows them to meet and interact with other fairytale folk.

There's so much fun to be had in this book, because Jack and Jill go an incredible adventure - they meet giants and mermaids and goblins and more! I felt like a kid while I was reading it, and I was completely entertained and enchanted by everything that went on (even if most of it was surprisingly not-so-happy-and-fluffy).

As with all fairytales, Jack's story and Jill's story is meant to teach the reader a lesson. In a Glass Grimmly effectively brings Jack and Jill, and all the other characters we meet, to the right resolution for them. When I reached the very end of the book, I felt like it was absolutely the right time to see "The End" grace the page.

In a Glass Grimmly is sassy, funny, intelligent and just a lot of fun. Adam Gidwitz sure knows how to tell a story! He's crafted this one in the pattern of many other fairytales gone before it, while also putting his own spin on things. I think this is a book that younger readers will love, but older readers will definitely have fun reading it too! I highly recommend In a Glass Grimmly, especially if you're looking for something amusing and clever.
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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
on October 14, 2012
Format: Hardcover
My (now) 10-year-old loved A Tale Dark and Grimm, so when he learned about the new book, he bought it the moment it became available (through a book fair, two weeks before the official release date). He and I have been reading it at his bedtime, and I think I am enjoying it as much as he is.

Gidwitz not only has a talent for storytelling (and if you have any opportunity to hear him do so in person, you should move heaven and earth to do so)--he is a beautiful writer. Using mostly simple words (with more unusual ones like "espied" and "obsidian" sprinkled in judiciously) he tells a well-paced tale that really begs to be read aloud. There are a lot of childrens' authors whose books you read and you think the particular words they use hardly matter--when you're scrambling to get to the end of a chapter as bedtime approaches, you can skip lots of text so long as you get the gist of the action across. But the phrasing in Gidwitz's books has a marvelous cadence that makes you want to slow down and savor the words actually used. The story is also quite funny from time to time.

This book is good enough that I plan to go back and read the segments I missed when my son was reading to himself; who knows--I may find myself reading A Tale Dark and Grimm soon.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
Format: Paperback
My grandson is such a fan of Adam Gidwitz's writing and loves his books. He is nine, and he read the first book with glee. In fact,he is a voracious reader, and his parents have difficulty keeping him in books. They visit the library very often, and as soon as he decides what he would like to read, they put the list on Amazon and I send a book.

In this book, the protagonists are Jack and Jill, and children will learn that sometimes you must go through difficult experiences. They take a journey through different fairytales. They are on a Quest to find a Looking Glass. Jack falls down and breaks his crown, and Jill tumbles after with a frog named Frog. Jack and Jill have tough times, and they search for different things. Jack wants to be respected and adored, Jill wants to be beautiful like her mother. they visit the clouds where they meet a frightening group of giants, off to the sea where they meet a cruel mermaid, to the goblin market, and on and on. This book encompasses the Brothers Grimm with other fairy tales and nursery rhymes. Lessons to be learned are aplenty.

There is a snarky narrator who interrupts with his own take, often humorous, and children will love this interruption. Well written, with humor and children and adults will delight in this book.

Recommended. prisrob 03-10-15
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on September 14, 2013
Format: Kindle Edition
it was cool and funny and it was good also i liked the part where they go and the giants all throw up
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
VINE VOICEon January 19, 2013
Format: Hardcover
Last year Gidwitz's book A Tale Dark & Grimm made quite a splash--and the splash was the sound of an ax falling into a pool of blood. His second book is just as good, as long as you like your fairy tales with that traditional ingredient, horror. This book has more humor than the first one, mostly because of a frog who acts as part comic relief and part conscience (or at least the voice of common sense), a la Jiminy Cricket. We meet a boy named Jack who tries too hard to please the village boys, and then his cousin, a princess named Jill who tries too hard to please her cold-hearted mother. Also the aforementioned frog. Then a scary old woman promises the two kids their hearts' desires in return for fetching her a magic mirror. This is all after an episode straight out of "The Emperor's New Clothes." And so it goes, with giants, mermaids, goblins, an enormous salamander, and the terrible Others making an appearance.

I don't know if I just got used to it with the first book, but the intrusive narrator didn't bother me this time around. I did find In a Glass Grimmly a little more messagey. However, this one is a more cheerful read, and I liked following Jack and Jill around the grisly realm of fairy tales. (Never fear--they do fall down a hill at one point.) And even with all of the blood and guts Gidwitz throws in, young readers will know the whole time that these two kids are going to make it.

First line: "Once upon a time, fairy tales were horrible."
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on December 19, 2012
Format: Hardcover
In a Glass Grimmly is the companion to A Tale Dark and Grimm. It just came out this fall, and I loved it just as much. It follows Jack and Jill, two royal cousins, along with a talking three-legged frog, as they travel and experience (you guessed it) ever more bloody things. Adam Gidwitz's sharp humor is again apparent in this second book. The funny thing is, though in both books, he's always warning you about the bloody parts, they're not actually that bloody or disgusting. I'm sure in real life, they would be, but in the novel (at least for me), you just don't feel that disgusted.

In a Glass Grimmly was slightly better, I think, than A Tale Dark and Grimm. There are less witty asides from the narrator of the book, which are perhaps the funniest things to read. There are still plenty of them, though, and the book is structured much the same way, with each new chapter beginning, "once upon a time", but the story itself is better.

My favorite part of the book may just have been when Jill outwits the giants by having an eating contest and pouring the porridge into a blanket. The ruse is discovered, but she has more tricks up her sleeve. I won't give it ac\way, but it was pretty funny. But then Jack gets mad that she saved them from the mess he got them into and falls down and breaks his head. Oops. I probably shouldn't have told you that. But don't worry. He recovers. Overall, this book is less bloody and has more "life lessons", like telling you to love yourself, just the way you are. Whenever they get in trouble, either Jack saves them, or Jill, or the frog, or they all work together to save each other.

In a Glass Grimmly is written in the same vein as A Tale Dark and Grimm, and I would highly recommend it.
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on January 29, 2015
Format: Paperback
In his follow-up to A Tale Dark & Grimm, Adam Gidwitz continues his practice of adapting classic fairy tales while retaining the blood and guts and gore (and morals) of the originals. The result is a pair of stories in the vein of the Harry Potter series: books intended for children but thoroughly enjoyable for adults. Though he strays farther from the original tales in Grimmly, readers will still recognize pieces of such classics as "The Emperor's New Clothes" and "Jack and the Beanstalk," and the creative liberties allow Gidwitz to further establish himself as a fine storyteller in his own right. His tales are bloody and funny and sad and meaningful, and the 313 pages pass quickly for an adult reader. His witty asides, warnings, and subtle moralizings, interspersed throughout the text, are charming diversions. However, there are fewer of them than in Dark & Grimm, and I find myself wishing for just a few more of these rare glimpses into Gidwitz's engaging storyteller persona.
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on September 7, 2014
Format: PaperbackVerified Purchase
Second in a series - you cannot go wrong with reading this wonderful series to your children aged 7 and older. While there are some frightening descriptions and lots of bloody scenes, the Narrator's interjections keep the scary bits light and entertaining. The sentence structure and vocabulary are straight from Grammar/Vocab Heaven; we found it wonderful to explain what a word meant and then try to use it in regular conversations. This was not an easy job with words such as craggy and perspicacity!
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4 of 6 people found the following review helpful
on September 29, 2012
Format: Hardcover
Adam Gidwitz's A TALE DARK & GRIMM was an unbelievable wonder: a children's book that combined a whirlwind of Grimm's fairytales that became a salve and benediction to all those readers with lost playground days and unresolved glances to the rearview mirror. ATD&G worked (and continues to work) on multiple levels, and spoke many languages, but it had surprise on it's side, and a killer ending. So, the expectations were very high for IN A GLASS GRIMMLY, and it does that rare thing in literature: it does not try to be better than it's predecessor, but instead, to stand proudly beside it and tell an equally enthralling story.

IN A GLASS GRIMMLY is truly more of a companion piece than an actual sequel to ATD&G. In Gidwitz's mythology, about sixty years have passed, and we are set to embark with with Gretel's granddaughter, Jill, and Hansel's grandson, Jack. We have left the Kingdom of Grimm behind, and now find ourselves in the Land of Marchen (basically a change from Germany to Denmark.) But, I believe, this world is darker, and there is a gloom that hangs over this land because of a goblin prank that went terribly wrong (my connecting of the dots and clues... other readers might discover other paths that have a different interpretive clarity, too). The promise of Hansel's & Gretel's victory has been short-lived, and we are left with Jack, Jill, and Frog trying to right an ancient wrong that will permit, at the very least, a simple yet seismic reset on their lives, and the lives of the characters that stand along the road. Everyone you meet is troubled and fractured; much like the legendary mirror at the tale's motivational center. I will say that the middle journey of IAGG might even be more strange and engaging with these gaggle of broken characters. Their stories are surprising and contain the requisite controlled blood splatter that makes for the best discoveries.

The particular grain of bread found in IAGG is much darker than the one that sustained ATD&G, but I do not not believe that this loaf is without nutrition. On the contrary, there is great familiarity in these new (old) stories, and now he's added Hans Christian Andersen's lantern to Jacob & Wilhem's dim hallways. In these undiscovered pages and days, there are Magic Trees, Brotherhoods of Giants, Melancholy Mermaids, Homicidal Goblins, Fractured Mirrors, and an Eddie... And each one of these strange travelers has sat noisily beside me, and guided this fulfilling reading experience. And even when the Ravens (the hilarious threads of continuity from the previous story, the ones that link the two worlds with such warmth and humor) yelled gently and sarcastically to get me back on the path, I realized that these voices had already become some of my closest friends. Thank you, Adam Gidwitz, for another glorious story that sits like a old friend's hand on my shoulder, and like a frosted window unto my childhood.

Relax, it's only scary for just a little while (but oh, what a delight it is to be reminded, again)!
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on October 21, 2014
Format: PaperbackVerified Purchase
An exciting, adventurous, not-your-average-fairy-tale story of two children, Jack, an average peasant boy with a runny nose, and Jill, a pretty princess whose mother has a heart of ice. Jill runs from the palace, Jack from his home, and on the way they meet a talking frog, with whose help, a single enchanted bean goes a long way. Hilarious, witty, and overall the "Awesome" fairy tale, this book is absolutely great!
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