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In Love with Everything Paperback – November 20, 2009


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 248 pages
  • Publisher: Infinity Publishing (November 20, 2009)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0741455994
  • ISBN-13: 978-0741455994
  • Product Dimensions: 5.5 x 0.6 x 8.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 10.4 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (7 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,307,777 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

From a mystical point of view, I think there is a lot to be said for ignoring personal history, and yet there is also a little to be said in favor of giving a brief resume. Ive worked as a day-laborer in Queens, New York; a brakeman on the Norfolk and Western railroad; a farmhand near Dundee, Ohio; a high school teacher in Tamale, Ghana; a forward artillery observer at Khe Sahn, Vietnam; a psychiatric nurse in Los Angeles; a plumbers assistant in the World Bank building; and a busboy in Athens, Ohio. Ive practiced mystical cultivation for a number of years and although I am pretty good at it, I have only scratched the surface. Yet despite being at this modest level, I have no problem appreciating what it is that causes me to love you and every other being.

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Customer Reviews

4.7 out of 5 stars
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See all 7 customer reviews
Raymond Sigrist has written a book that describes the territory at the furthest edges of mysticism.
Patti Vaught
At first glance the general reader will be a bit surprised, even startled, by the book's title: 'In Love with Everything'.
Jan F. Brouwer
Even the bad can feel good for Raymond is no longer at the mercy of circumstance for whatever comes is welcome.
Butch

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

11 of 11 people found the following review helpful By Vincent on February 8, 2010
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
In Love with Everything is shamelessly a self-help book, but it's notably free from all the cliches with which that genre is beset. Sigrist's profound honesty make it a safe read for anyone, even the most obsessively credulous. It will not mislead you or waste your time. He shares with the reader his work in progress, whether it's wrestling with different aspects of his nature, despair, or love without reason, the latter being the prevailing mood. It's by no means a first-person narrative, yet perversely I see it in parts as a "factless autobiography" - that invention of Fernando Pessoa's "The Book of Disquiet". Raymond Sigrist doesn't compete with the greatest Portuguese writer of the 20th century, but here is his "Book of Ecstasy".

There are authors who might offer their readers a health-and-safety warning in some out-of-the-way place, but Sigrist blazons his on the front cover: "The Benefits and Dangers of Love Without Reason". Of course the dangers are likely to intrigue rather than repel the potential reader, promising not just honesty but a journey full of colour and adventure; which he certainly delivers, though the adventures are those of the soul.

He takes the writings of a Chinese Taoist sage Chuang Tzu (Zhuangzi) as the starting-point of his own account of Taoist practice and its impact in today's terms; accompanied by his own luminous translations. Along the way, he throws out tantalizing references to other mystics, saints and thinkers (for example Meister Eckhart, Margaret Porete, St John of the Cross, Georges Bataille), together with quotations from the scriptures of many traditions - and even from two pseudonymous alter egos (a Pessoan touch!): Carla Ansantina and Rawley Creed.

His teachings (ideas? personal experiences?
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Butch on April 17, 2010
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This book flies in the face of conventional wisdom. It is a rebel yell in the dark night of the soul. A call to bare one's arms so as to embrace the whole. A gathering of paradox and mystery. A light in the middle of the tunnel. Raymond Carl Sigrist is head over heels in love with being completely out of his conditioned mind. His is truly a Crazy Wisdom. He is in love with everything for no reason at all. Raymond's love is a mystical love. A radical love.

Raymond has found a compatriot in the writings of an obscure Taoist/Chan sage history has named Zhuangzi (Chuang Tzu). The Patriarch of Apophatic Mysticism. At the heart of the apophatic method is the surrender of one's agendas. Love is sufficient unto itself. The only thing love needs is love. Love loves company. Others have influenced Raymond's thinking, especially Lao Tzu, but Zhuangzi is Raymond's muse.

Most of us tend to think of ourselves as nothing more than our thoughts. I think, therefore I am. Or more revealingly, I think, therefore I think I am. Raymond does not trust this majority report concerning our existential nature. He provisionally realizes that we are very likely far more than merely our thoughts. He is cagey this one. Nobody's fool except his own. In the face of existence, words, concepts, come up short. And Raymond knows it. Or as Laozi (Lao Tzu) noted in the Dao De Jing (Tao Te Ching) "The tao that can be named is not the eternal Tao." Words are symbols, and as such are not to be confused with what is of itself so. Raymond takes his meditation nearly everyday whether he needs to or not. Some things are best said in silence.

Raymond would have us embrace the whole. The joy as well as the sorrow. The good times as well as the bad. The ecstasy and the agony of life.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Patti Vaught on January 13, 2010
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Raymond Sigrist has written a book that describes the territory at the furthest edges of mysticism. What happens when you suspend all belief and also suspend the sustaining hope which belief usually provides us with? The result, he tells us, will be either disaster, or if we are more fortunate-- an ecstatic experience of all-embracing love that very few of us have dared to seek (for quite prudent reasons). It seems that the "apophatic" mystic must submit to a lethal threat posed by a spiritual cleansing whose thoroughness will force her to step to the brink of nihilism. We must become able to doubt everything except our immediate experience. This dangerous purging is undergone in order to leave the heart open wide enough for the arrival of an astonishing grace.

The literary quality of the book is uneven, but the many stunning insights make up for its occasional flaws. In this book we find that in the practice of apophatic mysticism, pleasure is not a four-letter word. In fact the entire aim of the practice is to reach an optimal level of personal satisfaction. But nor is there apparently much room for naval gazing; one has to escape from the normal limits of self-interest in order to obtain a far better outcome for oneself. By subordinating the desire to indulge in self-absorbed ruminations and by surrendering other habitual ways of thinking, another desire is born: an irrepressible urge to attain the ecstatic pleasure derived from continually falling in love with the entire world and each of the beings who live within it. The author writes:

"As soon as there is an idea to defend, there is a restriction of consciousness. Consequently the potential for intimacy with one's world diminishes. The mystic does not want her beliefs distancing her from you.
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