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In My Place Hardcover – October, 1992


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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 257 pages
  • Publisher: Farrar Straus & Giroux (T); 1st edition (October 1992)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0374175632
  • ISBN-13: 978-0374175634
  • Product Dimensions: 1.2 x 6 x 9.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.2 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (6 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,595,728 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

In this warmhearted, well-observed memoir, the national correspondent for the MacNeil-LehrerNewsHour reflects on her childhood and young adulthood, including her historic role as one of two black students who desegregated the University of Georgia in 196 1. Dwelling a bit too much on her family history and descriptions of the southern towns where she grew up, Hunter-Gault identifies many of the forces that shaped her: strong teachers, good friends and a dignified father struggling as a chaplain in a racist Army. After attending a largely white school in Alaska, she spent her high school years in the supportive black environment of L.A.-Lovely Atlanta. She downplays her heroism at the University of Georgia in order to highlight the heady but humbling feelings she derived from other blacks' pride in her. She tells of harassment and support in those dramatic years, as well as of her growth as a journalist, her public speaking tours and even her romance with a white Southerner. She concludes, a bit awkwardly, with the commencement address she delivered at her alma mater in 1988; this work hints, however, that Hunter-Gault could write a rich sequel.
Copyright 1992 Reed Business Information, Inc.

From School Library Journal

YA-- A vivid feeling of place and immediacy pervades this moving memoir of the first black woman to graduate from the University of Georgia. It is the story of growing up in Alaska on a military base and in small towns in Georgia during the stable 1950s and coming-of-age during the turbulent 1960s. Taught by her father, a military chaplain, that she deserved the best, and loved unconditionally by her mother and extended family, Hunter-Gault shows how she was emotionally equipped to face loneliness, ostracism, and even violence for the cause of civil rights. Her story is about the universal adolescent search for one's place in the family, among one's peers, in the community, and eventually in the world. It is also a compelling documentation of the ugly turmoil of the times. An inspiring historical journey.
- Jackie Gropman, Richard Byrd Library, Springfield, VA
Copyright 1993 Reed Business Information, Inc.

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

8 of 10 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on April 17, 1999
Format: Paperback
I enjoyed the reading of this inspirational message. It is truly a must-read for adolescents who are aspiring to make their mark on the world. Mrs. Hunter-Gault shares intimate feelings of her experiences. Her book demonstrates her worthiness as a beacon to those who are searching.
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9 of 12 people found the following review helpful By Marion E. Gold on April 19, 2000
Format: Paperback
Hunter-Gault's story is inspiring to all women who must transcend the prejudice and stereotyping imposed upon us by a society that has yet to learn to appreciate diversity. African, Asian, Hispanic and Caucasian-American women - all have made unique and indelible contributions to women's history and to the rich cultural history of our country. We should celebrate them in our schools and in our hearts!
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9 of 12 people found the following review helpful By MAXIMILLIAN MUHAMMAD HALL OF FAME on January 11, 2000
Format: Paperback
mrs.Hunter-Gault's book is very powerful.overcoming hostility and race.the fight and determination is a must read for todays youth.i couldn't put this book down.very deep.
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