Industrial-Sized Deals TextBTS15 Shop Women's Handbags Learn more nav_sap_SWP_6M_fly_beacon Disturbed Fire TV Stick Subscribe & Save Shop Popular Services tmnt tmnt tmnt  Amazon Echo Starting at $99 Kindle Voyage AutoRip in CDs & Vinyl Shop Now Deal of the Day
In the Name of Democracy: American War Crimes in Iraq and... and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

In the Name of Democracy: American War Crimes in Iraq and Beyond (American Empire Project) Paperback – October 13, 2005

8 customer reviews

See all 2 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
$7.00 $0.01

Best Books of the Year So Far
Best Books of the Year So Far
Looking for something great to read? Browse our editors' picks for 2015's Best Books of the Year So Far in fiction, nonfiction, mysteries, children's books, and much more.

Editorial Reviews

From Booklist

As Americans undergo an agonizing reappraisal of the war in Iraq and its relationship to the war on terror, strong evidence has arisen that America's war crimes are normative rather than exceptional infractions by a few low-ranking individuals, as commonly portrayed. This excellent anthology includes interviews, FBI documents, legal briefs, and statements by soldiers turned resisters, all offering a chilling look at how the war was begun and is currently operating. Part 1 examines the evidence pointing to war crimes committed by the U.S., from the perspective of international law, in its tactics of preemptive strike and violations of humanitarian law designed to protect combatants and civilians. Other sections explore who is accountable for the torture and other illegal acts performed in the course of the war as well as the role of resisters and objectors. Finally, this work examines the failure of our established institutional structure to restrain the administration's war crimes. This is a timely collection for readers interested in the threat of our war on terror as presently being fought at home and abroad. Vernon Ford
Copyright © American Library Association. All rights reserved

About the Author

Historian Jeremy Brecher has written and edited more than a dozen books, including Strike! His articles have appeared in the Chicago Tribune, The Nation, and the Los Angeles Times. Jill Cutler, an assistant dean at Yale College, has edited several books, including Global Visions. Brendan Smith is an expert in international law and a former senior congressional human rights and defense aide. He has written for the Los Angeles Times, The Nation, and Foreign Policy
in Focus.


NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Best Books of the Month
Best Books of the Month
Want to know our Editors' picks for the best books of the month? Browse Best Books of the Month, featuring our favorite new books in more than a dozen categories.

Product Details

  • Series: American Empire Project
  • Paperback: 352 pages
  • Publisher: Metropolitan Books; First Edition edition (November 1, 2005)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0805079696
  • ISBN-13: 978-0805079692
  • Product Dimensions: 6.1 x 1 x 9.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 14.1 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 3.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (8 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,500,599 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

22 of 24 people found the following review helpful By Robin Orlowski on November 4, 2005
Format: Paperback
Jeremy Brecher sifts through mountains of evidence to question how the United States can justify torturing people if we are trying to convince them that adopting a western-style democracy is in their own best interests.

Furthermore, he argues these events are not isolated incidents. Seemingly disparate events are connected. Many of America's public officials convinced themselves, each other, and the troops that we are above the law because we are making the world safe for democracy. Couple the American government's jingoistic ideology with a solider's stress of being in a guerilla war--where anybody could be a combatant---and there is no surprise that some members of the American forces commit war crimes in the Middle East.

Brecher's ultimate analysis questions the ethics of many American policy holders. However, he believes in the American people to demand better behavior from their leaders. This makes the breadth of disturbing information in his volume easier to digest.
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
20 of 22 people found the following review helpful By jgmacg on November 6, 2005
Format: Paperback
This well-reasoned and level-headed collection of writings about America's conduct of the "War on Terror" is a chilling indictment of U.S. policy. That we are willing to cede our most basic national principles in service of our fear and historical ignorance, and in the name of this administration's failures and fixations, is at once terrifying and heartbreaking. This is a call to moral action, no matter which side of the politcal aisle you seat yourself. At the core of this book lies this question, asked and paraphrased through many ages: Must we destroy our country in order to save it?
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
14 of 15 people found the following review helpful By Robert David STEELE Vivas HALL OF FAMETOP 1000 REVIEWER on June 22, 2007
Format: Paperback
I confess to being uncomfortable when I bought this book, which addresses in a very comprehensive way the degree to which the US Government and the US military as well as intelligence, mercenary, and corporate personnel, are committing war crimes.

I want to say up front, that as best I can tell; our brave and professional troops are in fact making lemonade from lemons, and doing the best they can. However, they all realize that they and all the world was lied to by the Bush Administration, that this is about oil, and that they are killing civilians and many children for no good reason, due to the horrible circumstances that we have created by remaining there. According to this book, suicides are up 40%, there are 6000 deserters, and seamen recruits are *winning* when court-martialed for refusing to obey illegal orders to go to Iraq.

The editors have done a superb job of bringing together a collection of proven individuals including President Jimmy Carter, Senator Robert Byrd, Daniel Ellsberg, Sy Hersh, a group of US Generals (retired) protesting the White House mandated torture, and a wide variety of individual experts on war crimes.

The book opens with a discussion of three kinds of war crime:

1) Wars of aggression, i.e. unprovoked, pre-emptive, unjustified

2) Violations of humanitarian law

3) Crimes against humanity

You can read the book for the details. Suffice to say that they set the stage with objective factual discussion, and then proceed to document, most ably, the reality that the United States of America is now a war criminal in the larger context of humanity.
Read more ›
2 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
18 of 20 people found the following review helpful By John Russell on November 1, 2005
Format: Paperback
_In the Name of Democracy_ does a good job of explaining what constitutes war crimes (it's not just torture) and setting out the case that the U.S. invasion of Iraq violated international laws. There's a lot to digest in this book, not all of it pleasant, but I found the discussions of the importance of international law to be useful and not too over-scholarly: I learned a lot. The parts toward the end about resisters and how to put a halt to war crimes were interesting and inspiring and provide a more personal connection to a lot of the issues raised in the chapters. The book ends by looking at the connections between the subversion of international law and the subversion of U.S. law, which should be of interest to anyone who values democracy and liberty.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Want to discover more products? Check out this page to see more: shapiro legality