In Search of the Soul: Four Views of the Mind-Body Problem and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

In Search of the Soul: Four Views of the Mind-Body Problem Paperback – May 1, 2005

ISBN-13: 978-0830827732 ISBN-10: 0830827730

6 New from $29.99 19 Used from $7.30
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
$29.99 $7.30

Free%20Two-Day%20Shipping%20for%20College%20Students%20with%20Amazon%20Student



NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Save up to 90% on Textbooks
Rent textbooks, buy textbooks, or get up to 80% back when you sell us your books. Shop Now

Product Details

  • Paperback: 264 pages
  • Publisher: InterVarsity Press (May 2005)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0830827730
  • ISBN-13: 978-0830827732
  • Product Dimensions: 8.8 x 6 x 0.7 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 12 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 3.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (7 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #226,707 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Authors

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

3.3 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

9 of 9 people found the following review helpful By A. Customer on May 26, 2008
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This fabulous book is a great Christian introduction to the Metaphysics of Persons. (Make no mistake: this is a piece of Christian philosophy!) Although it can be slightly technical at times, any motivated undergraduate or learned layman should have no problems tackling this book. It has six parts--an introduction, the four views, and a conclusion. Each view has about 25-30 pages, with 10-15 pages in response by the other three contributors. The introduction by Joel Green--one of the editors--provides various definitions and discusses the relevance of science, scripture, and experience to the metaphysics of persons.

Representing immaterial approaches, we have two views. Stew Goetz argues for the first view: Substance Dualism. Goetz believes he is a immaterial substance, entirely distinct from his body, that possess certain abilities--like agency, cognition, the ability to feel pain and pleasure, etc (36-7). Goetz is an `antecedent dualist'--someone whose belief that he is an immaterial soul is basic. Using his antecedent dualism, Goetz provides an argument for his view called the `Simple Argument,' basically, that he is a simple substance, and his body is not simple, so he cannot be identical with his body (43-4). Bill Hasker argues for the second view: Emergent Dualism. Hasker believes that the structure of the brain and nervous system give rise to a soul (much the same way a magnet gives rise to a magnetic field). The soul `emerges' from the brain and nervous system (78-9). But, although this soul depends on physical components, it is not reduced to those physical components (83-5, 91-2). Furthermore, this soul has certain `emergent' powers--like free will.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
10 of 11 people found the following review helpful By David C. Cramer on May 12, 2009
Format: Paperback
After an introductory chapter by Joel Green (more on that later), Stewart Goetz starts things off with a pretty standard statement of a view known as substance dualism, i.e., the view that human beings are comprised of both a material body and an immaterial soul. Goetz argues that the belief in dualism is the common belief of normal people throughout history. It's just the view one comes to when one thinks about oneself introspectively. Since it is so common, Goetz is convinced that people only reject it when they can't accept some of its implications. Thus, he spends quite a bit of his chapter defending the view against some of its most common criticisms.

William Hasker next offers his account of the view known as emergent dualism, which ultimately also holds that there are two substances to humans, material and immaterial, but argues that the latter emerges from the former rather than being divinely imparted as traditional substance dualism holds. Hasker argues that his view accounts for the findings of other disciplines, such as in the sciences, better than traditional substance dualism.

Nancy Murphy argues for a view called nonreductive physicalism, which holds that humans are entirely physical, i.e., have no immaterial souls, yet the higher level actions of humans cannot be reduced to strictly physical and biological causes. There is something at the psychological level that accounts for the choices and decisions we make.

Finally, Kevin Corcoran argues for a view called the constitution view of persons, which holds that humans beings are just made up of their physical parts, but are nonetheless not identical with the sum of their physical parts.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
6 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Stephen J. Segner on November 13, 2008
Format: Paperback
"In Search of the Soul" is an interesting counterpoints book presenting four opposing sides of the mind-body problem that are active within the Christian community today.

It includes the substance dualist, emergent dualist, nonreductive physicalist, and consitutional views. Each view is represented by a major contributor to the literature supporting each view.

I think a major drawback to this volume is that each of the contributors spends too much time dealing with specific issues that have arisen as a result of their view (such as responsibly for Murphy, or the resurrection for Corcoran)and not enough time explaining exactly what their view IS.

Another issue with this collection is that it does not have a representative from the Thomistic perspective. Thomism is alive and well within Catholic thinking.

Might be worth your while, but I would suggest getting the individual volumes for each of the contributors. Hasker, Murphy, and Corcoran each have their own books. This volume just does not go in depth enough to give the reader a firm grasp of what exactly each position is claiming.

Have a Wonderful Day!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
9 of 13 people found the following review helpful By Robert W. Kellemen on September 29, 2006
Format: Paperback
"In Search of the Soul" is written in the classic "four views" motif where four separate authors present their views on a top, with each author also responding to the other views. Readers receive an overview of primary current views of the nature of human nature. The writing is academic and dense, and thus not for the average reader, but for the academic specializing in biblical anthropology. For the specialist, this is surely the place to start in gaining an understanding of the current debate.

Reviewer: Bob Kellemen, Ph.D., is the author of "Biblical Psychology," Soul Physicians, Spiritual Friends, and Beyond the Suffering: Embracing the Legacy of African American Soul Care and Spiritual Direction .
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Customer Images

Search

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?