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In Season: Cooking with Vegetables and Fruits Hardcover – September 16, 2008


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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 464 pages
  • Publisher: Universe (September 16, 2008)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0789318113
  • ISBN-13: 978-0789318114
  • Product Dimensions: 9.8 x 7.5 x 1.6 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 3.6 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (17 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #648,003 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

In Season is more than encyclopedic: it's instructive, practical, charming, and written with utter devotion to its subject. "Food is the medium here," writes New York's Blue Hill chef Dan Barber in the foreword, "but the message amounts to a philosophy of life. She may teach us a thing or two about cooking, but the real lesson is learning how to eat." It's clear that this book, Raven's fourth, is not a cookbook so much as an act of love, maybe even a religion. Count me as one of its most fervent devotees. -- House Beautiful, September, 2008

"...luscious new book...the photos of fresh produce will have you careening to the kitchen..." --United Media

"This is a book you'll want to use for inspiration and low-stress entertaining." ~Los Angeles Times "This book is a great addition to feature in your fresh produce aisle." --Globalchefs.com

Review

"...luscious new book...the photos of fresh produce will have you careening to the kitchen..."

"This is a book you'll want to use for inspiration and low-stress entertaining."

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Customer Reviews

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There are some great pictures, all the recipes are easily readable.
kiwanissandy
Raven splits up veggies/fruits by their peak month, gives an intro to each of her picks, and follows with recipes ranging from simple to moderate.
A. Patel
Rosemary Saddleback Potatoes: Though there are lots of wonderful potato recipes in this book, I had to try this.
Cathe

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

38 of 38 people found the following review helpful By Cathe VINE VOICE on December 15, 2008
Format: Hardcover
Since I'm trying to eat food produced locally as much as possible, I was excited to hear about Sara Raven's new cookbook "In Season: Cooking with Vegetables and Fruit." According to her bio, Raven is an expert on all things to grow and eat from your garden and has written several gardening books. I was interested to see what advice she'd have on cooking.

Let me start by saying that this is an absolutely beautiful book. It's hardcover with bright green and orange ribbon bookmarks. The paper is thick and the book is packed with vibrant, colorful photos that will make your mouth water.

The book is divided into six chapters beginning from January/February and ending with November/December, so no matter what season it is, you can find out what's available and how to prepare it. Within the chapters, Raven highlights five to fifteen foods, but as you might expect, there are more options in the summer months than winter.

Each food section begins with information about the food--different varieties, how to select them, basic preparation instructions, etc. The introduction is followed by a selection of recipes featuring that food. The Green Bean section, for example, includes recipes such as Summer Garden Tempura, Spaghetti with Beans and Tomatoes, and Trofie with Potatoes, Beans, and Pesto (trofie is a type of pasta).

Because of the subtitle "Cooking with fruits and vegetables," I thought this would be a vegetarian cookbook. It's not. There are quite a few meat dishes, particularly in the herb sections. But out of the 450 recipes in the book, I found plenty of recipes that are free of animal products, or can be easily made so by substituting vegan versions of dairy products. Here are some examples of some vegan or easily veganized recipes in the book.
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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Babylegs on February 15, 2009
Format: Hardcover
Written by a british chef, this omniverous vegetable and fruit cookbook brings the garden into your kitchen, emphasizing what's in season, with a variety of eclectic flavors. So far, I've made the minestrone, braised cabbage, and lamb chops with anchovy crust, and have a long list of other recipes to try. The minestrone was great; the cabbage recipe included orange zest, which I think I'll skip next time...the lamb was very good, but the sauce strangely included two whole oranges worth of shredded zest, which was a little much.

The book is beautiful, with a photo almost every other page. My criticisms - sometimes imprecise quantities (like six "large" potatoes...(how big is a large potato, and what kind (waxy, floury?)) - and I think I'll end up tweaking more of the recipes to my taste. As the other reviewer suggested, the book includes some veggies and fruit that are probably more common in the UK than here. But overall this book presents an excellent and varied selection of recipes, from simple to decadent, and lots of new ideas about ways to cook fruit and vegetables, both with and without meat or fish.
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20 of 27 people found the following review helpful By Eve Avery on August 2, 2009
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
This is a beautiful book, with lots of lovely color photographs. However, many of the photographs are not of the actual recipes. The recipes are okay. Many of them are not things that I would actually make, i.e. there is a lot of baking, jam making, ice creams. Also the fruit/veggies that are readily available (melons, sweet peppers, etc) often have fewer recipes than obscure/expensive fruits/veggies (gooseberries, currants, zuccini flowers, etc). It was interesting to read, but I am returning it because I don't think I will ever actually use it.

Note: I have not made any of the recipes, because I struggled to find something that I actually wanted to make and could get all the ingredients for at a reasonable price.
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15 of 20 people found the following review helpful By kiwanissandy VINE VOICE on November 14, 2008
Format: Hardcover
This cookbook is divided so that each month tells you what fruits and vegetables are in season. It's amazing. I had no idea there were even these vegetables in existence! LOL.

I guickly turned to the November/December chapter as I was headed to the grocery. And the vegetables mentioned were brussel sprouts, chard, kale, leeks, pomegranates, cranberries and winter root vegetables.

Brussle sprouts are not a vegetable I would choose to eat regularly but I thought for the purpose of this review I could...once. Unfortunately my Kroger store had a terrible selection of brussel sprouts. I picked the best I could and of the 3 recipes provided I chose the one that I actually had all the ingredients (I did not have creme fraiche, or a handful of chopped fresh herbs) so I made the saute of red brussel sprouts with almonds, page 391. hummmm....something went wrong because it did not taste as I would have liked. But like I said, my grocery had a pitiful selection of brussel sprouts and I live in the mid-west so truly fresh produce is limited.

I didn't find chard or kale in my grocery but then I see the author suggests growing your own. Well it's too late for that this year. The one recipe for kale seaweed did not seem appetizing to me. I, in honesty, did not try it. Perhaps November and December were not good months to start with. However while trying all these dishes I did discover the recipe for Cranberry Vodka which I did try and which I can say is wonderful! I then moved on to Cranberry Cocktail and it too was really good.

I made the orange and cranberry pie recipe but I also added granny smith apples to the mix. It was very good. All in all the cookbook delivers on what it says it does.
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