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on November 19, 2009
When I first heard that Editors were putting aside their strings for keyboards, I thought two things. First, I hoped that this was not the destination for them, but rather a progression of the brilliant discography they started 5 years ago. In other words, I didn't want them to see themselves as going from Joy Division to New Order and then stopping there. They are just trying something new. The other thing I thought was, "I hope they don't embarrass themselves."

Well, they don't. They are not trying to be New Order, Depeche Mode, Kraftwerk, or any other 1980s synth-pop band. This is still an Editors album. And they don't just get through a bunch of songs without their guitars. They manage to pull off some surprises and dramatic musical departures.

The band says they had to do this in order to produce a third studio album on-time (which for them was year-end 2009). So they motivated themselves to do different things. And then they increased their chance of success by hiring Flood to produce the album. Flood's presence really makes itself felt on the fifth track, The Big Exit, which has a 'no-wave' guitar intro straight out of an early 1970s Brian Eno record (Another Green World, actually). Guitars are present from time to time on tracks like the title track, 'Papillon', 'The Boxer', 'Like Treasure', and 'Human' (on the 'Cuttings II' bonus disc), and when they are heard, they have that Flood feel to them (think 1990s U2 or Smashing Pumpkins, only distant or muted).

Listing to the album a few times through now, it occurs to me that 'Like Treasure' is the brightest song on the album, and it comes close to sounding like Coldplay without being obvious. Again, this album is full of moments like that. You know where the influences are from, but the compositions succeed in being original based on the sum of their ingredients. The Editors take bits and pieces of 30 years of UK rock and make it all their own.

This is a solid album for Editors, no less enjoyable or interesting than their previous two. But certainly different. Apparently they want to work with Flood again, so we shouldn't be surprised if their next album in 2011 or 2012 is also synth-dominated.

Overall, this is a slightly darker album for Editors (keep in mind their first two were fairly dark to begin with). It is meant to be a late night London album - a simple but appropriate theme for them. Subtle and direct references to London appear throughout and are both highlighted and bookended by the opening and closing tracks. I think theme-wise, the ordering of the tracks couldn't be more perfect. Editors seemed to have sweated the details because they care about what an album is supposed to be. Dying medium or not, Editors are committed to making good albums.

Perhaps the band had to go this route. They did it not only to prove they are capable of setting a new goal and achieving it - but to prove that they are going to be with us for a while. If they reach a fifth album, and bring back their trademark distorted rhythm guitars, they will have completed a 10-year cycle most other bands fail to achieve.

The Editors always seem tip their hats to greater artists that have come before (mainly the giants of the 80s New Wave). But with each full album, they are becoming great themselves. Let's see where they go next.
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on October 21, 2009
With only two studio albums under their belt prior to "In This Light and On This Evening", Editors have proved themselves to be fairly consistent in their sound. When I heard they were working on a third album, I had high expectations and wanted it to essentially pick up where the previous two albums left off. Then I heard that Flood was slated to produce the album and my expectations immediately went away, leaving me wondering what direction the band was going. Upon first listen, Flood's influence is plainly obvious. This is not the Editors we've come to know and love and I was not impressed with this album after the first listen. That said, after multiple listens, I have found a new admiration for this band and the direction they've taken. Lyrically and melodically, not much has changed. Substitute their familiar guitar sound with synthesizers and that describes "In This Light and On This Evening" in a nutshell. The first single "Papillon" does not try to ease listeners into the band's new sound at all. Instead, it starts with the synthesizers up front and personal. The hammering melody that kicks off this song is instantly infectious and definitely "kicks like a sleep twitch", as the lyrics state. Editors have always tended to keep their albums fairly short and the 9 tracks on this one prove no different. The new direction may take some getting used to, but spend some time with this album and try not to judge it on 1 or 2 listens. I think bringing Flood in to produce was a risky move, but the reward is well worth it.
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on October 23, 2009
I absolutely loved "An End Has a Start" and was reluctant to believe that they had changed their sound to revolve heavily around synthesizers. After the initial and forthcoming listens, I was awaiting a breakdown in the album where it would ultimately sound cheap and processed. But honestly, this never happened. I had no idea where each song was going. That voice, so haunting, is the same as ever and seems to hold everything together as each layer adds on itself. The first half of the album is upbeat and driving while the second half seems to settle into more of a groove. I love the song "Eat Raw Meat=Blood Drool." The song continues to change and shift and form even to the end. I found myself inspired to create after listening to the Editors' latest.
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Editors' 2005 debut album "The Back Room" was one of the most accomplished debut albums of the past decade (I call it the UK's answer to Interpol's stellar debut album). The 2007 album "An End Has A Start" had some good songs on it but overall flet like a rehash of the debut album's musical ideas, and not nearly as good. THat left the band with a dilemma on what to do next. Having seen the fork in the road, the band apparently decided to take a decided left turn, and emerges with a new sound.

"In The Light and On The Evening" (14 tracks--including 5 bonus tracks; 67 min.) couldn't sound any different than the first two albums. The electric guitars have essentially been abandoned altogether, and instead a synthesizer sound (not unlike, say, Ultravox 25 years ago) is front and center. Check out the dark title track that opens the album. "Bricks and Mortar" (2nd UK single) and "Papillion" (1st UK single) follow in order. It's hard to see the commercial appeal of those songs, but as compared to the other songs on here, they are the 'catchiest' tracks on here. This is a mood album, pure and simple, and if you're in the proper mood, this will sound great. If you're looking for another serving of "The Back Room", you're going to be mightily disappointed, so, truly, buyer beware. The original album, released in the UK last October, ran 9 tracks. The US version comes with 5 bonus tracks (This House Is Full of Noice; I Want A Forest; A Life As a Ghost; Human; For the Money), all of which sound in the same vein as the regular albums tracks.

I've seen Editors in concert a number of times in support of their first two albums, and singer Tom Smith always gives his 110%, whether he's playing guitsr or piano, seemingly getting lost in a world of his own. It will be very interesting to find out how the new songs will be brought live (I guess guitar-player Chris Urbanowicz will switch to keyboards?). Can't wait to see those guys again. Finally, if you wonder where you can hear Editors, check out WOXY (BAM! The Future of Rock and Roll), the internet-only station that brings the best indie-music in the country, bar none, and where this album has been played regularly since its release.
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on November 10, 2009
Many people don't like this album simply because this is not the Editors, which were in the first two albums. That's true - they have changed. A lot of synth. Mainly synth.

It is natural that people who liked Editors because of the first two albums would like something very similar to those. On the other hand, if this album had been released by Teditors or Ditors, I have no doubt that this album would have been rated at least 4,5 stars. What people have to do is to accept that bands change and try listening to the "new" music. So I'm saying that this album is unfairly underrated. Is it because music is poor? No.

It is funny how the Killers sold so many copies of their newest release and the Editors didn't. Both bands added a lot of synth sound into their music. And you know what? Editors did it better. The new Editors sound captures the depressing fall, is melodic, catchy and fresh. What else - it's not boring. Every song in a way is same and at once very different from each other. The mood, temper and atmosphere keeps varying and though still deep and captivating.

Key tracks:
- Papillon
- The Big Exit
- Like Treasure
- Eat Raw Meat = Blood Drool
- Walk The Fleet Road
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on November 15, 2009
Boy, talk about challenges: The Editors is bombarded with comparisons to bands both new and old (Interpol and Joy Division) based on their first two albums. Now The Editors try something a bit different from those two albums and people are reacting as if the ship sank. Can't please everyone all the time I guess...

The album is good. Yes I was taken aback by the heavy electronic presence. While I'm a big fan of guitar-based rock, I can see how this is a natural extension of the Editors' sound. Let's face it --their use of instruments is close to a pulsing, mechanical sound than not. They are not known for riffs, they are known for rhythm. There are numerous tracks on their old albums where much of the guitar could be swapped for electronic elements and you'd hardly notice.

Again, at first listen I was kinda thinking "...What?". But after a few listens you feel The Editors (albeit a little dark --not that it's a bad thing.)

And I like the lyrics. They are kind of weird and as such lend to a unique identity for the band. Again, if there are so many comparisons to pre-existing bands, it's great that they are going off into their own world. More power to them --Editors keep it up.
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Editors' 2005 debut album "The Back Room" was one of the most accomplished debut albums of the past decade (I call it the UK's answer to Interpol's stellar debut album). The 2007 album "An End Has A Start" had some good songs on it but overall flet like a rehash of the debut album's musical ideas, and not nearly as good. THat left the band with a dilemma on what to do next. Having seen the fork in the road, the band apparently decided to take a decided left turn, and emerges with a new sound.

"In The Light and On The Evening" (9 tracks; 43 min.) couldn't sound any different than the first two albums. The electric guitars have essentially been abandoned altogether, and instead a synthesizer sound (not unlike, say, Ultravox 25 years ago) is front and center. Check out the dark title track that opens the album. "Bricks and Mortar" (2nd UK single) and "Papillion" (1st UK single) follow in order. It's hard to see the commercial appeal of those songs, but as compared to the other songs on here, they are the 'catchiest' tracks on here. This is a mood album, pure and simple, and if you're in the proper mood, this will sound great. If you're looking for another serving of "The Back Room", you're going to be mightily disappointed, so, truly, buyer beware.

I've seen Editors in concert a number of times in support of their first two albums, and singer Tom Smith always gives his 110%, whether he's playing guitsr or piano, seemingly getting lost in a world of his own. It will be very interesting to find out how the new songs will be brought live (I guess guitar-player Chris Urbanowicz will switch to keyboards?). Can't wait to see those guys again. Finally, if you wonder where you can hear Editors, check out WOXY (BAM! The Future of Rock and Roll), the internet-only station that brings the best indie-music in the country, bar none, and where this album has been played regularly since its UK release in October 2009 (the US release is January 12, 2010, with 5 bonus tracks to boot).
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on January 14, 2010
This album is a bit different from your first listen of "Bullets" from the original 7" record. Sometimes years of playing and gigging can change a life, or lives. I remember asking Chris what the next album would sound like after a gig during the "End-Start" tour. He laughed and said "you would probobly know better than me" with a laugh. We both agreed that the guitar had been put back a bit and there was more room made for the piano. So, from full on devastating tunes like "Munich", "All Sparks", and the soft easy peaceful lament of "Distance", there became more of a craft to the songwriting on "End-Start". Many critics said they had become like Colplay. I didn't here that. Nor do I hear any Joy Division in them at all with the exception of the deep nasal vocal. Morrison had it, Curtis had it, and what the heck, so does Paul banks(Interpol)-which sounds more like the Chameleons UK anyway all you citics!!! Wake up and listen! So, as for what I said to Chris about that third album, I said go for the "Ocean Rain"(Bunnymen)! Instead of strings I heard synth. But it is still very much like orchestration. The synth piece on "Papillon" is an interweaving loop that seems to swey back and forth up and down the scale. The human drum machine is perfect!LOL. The vocals are strong and robust. Very confident. That is what I love about Tom Toms voice. He really gets his lyric across even if it means banging it out 16 times. Anyway, the instrumentation on this new album and the lyrical context shows immense growth and humility in the face of the all mighty MUSIC INDUSTRY(major label). So if you like EDITORS, buy those CD singles and 7" records!!! They would appreciate it. I've collected everything they have released from the beginning and have been listening from the very start. So take it from a dedicated listener, give this album more than a few listens. In fact, try to listen to the entire album from start to finish without a break. Then it speaks. And yeah yeah yeah, every album is going to have its singles that you may hear too much but don't let that ruin an album. This album is a 5 star because it shows growth, creativity, imagination, color, experimentation, emotion(which is hard to capture digitally), energy, and of course that overall sense of a bunch of people all working together to create a strong foundation and build something that is pressed for listeners now and listeners in the future. EDITORS don't seem to be a band that is concerned with money or fame. Its purity. I respect that. I'll support that. Like this! Now go listen to "Munich" really f'n loud of you never have and tell me that that isn't REAL!!! Oh yeah, the new album is definately reccomended. Thanks for reading....and its EDITORS, not "THE editors". ;-) Looking forward to the show guys! I'll bring my own Sharpie this time!
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on November 27, 2009
This Editors album is a lot darker and more mysterious than their last album. They tried something new and replaced a lot of the guitars with synth...but it sounds amazing. As someone who is too young to have been able to experience Joy Division firsthand, this is the next best thing for me and is the sound that I have been looking for. Each song takes a different, unexpected twist filled with brooding synth beats and Tom Smith's voice.
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on November 6, 2009
I was a big fan of the first two Editors CDs. A guitar sound reminiscent of the Chameleons UK (an 80s favorite of mine). Saw them twice as well....once at the 9:30 Club in DC and the Electric Factory in Philly. This is a very different sound that is heavy on rhythmic synthesizers. I really enjoy this CD, although it is a very different sound for them.
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