Incidental Findings and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Buy New
$6.00
Qty:1
  • List Price: $15.00
  • Save: $9.00 (60%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Only 3 left in stock.
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
Add to Cart
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Incidental Findings: Lessons from My Patients in the Art of Medicine Paperback – Bargain Price, April 1, 2006


See all 6 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Paperback, Bargain Price
"Please retry"
$6.00
$3.45 $2.73

This is a bargain book and quantities are limited. Bargain books are new but could include a small mark from the publisher and an Amazon.com price sticker identifying them as such. Details


Special Offers and Product Promotions


Frequently Bought Together

Incidental Findings: Lessons from My Patients in the Art of Medicine + What Doctors Feel: How Emotions Affect the Practice of Medicine + Singular Intimacies: Becoming a Doctor at Bellevue
Price for all three: $36.11

Buy the selected items together

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Product Details

  • Paperback: 192 pages
  • Publisher: Beacon Press (April 1, 2006)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0807072672
  • ASIN: B004J8HX9U
  • Product Dimensions: 8.2 x 5.2 x 0.6 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 8.8 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (24 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,156,512 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

Ofri, an attending physician at New York City's Bellevue Hospital and founder of the Bellevue Literary Review, again displays the same sensitivity and carefully crafted writing that distinguished her first medical memoir (Singular Intimacies). The emphasis in these 14 engrossing pieces is on her determination to learn from those she has treated. Ofri begins by recounting a time when the shoe was on the other foot, when she, as a first-time expectant mother, was the patient. After a sonogram, Ofri and her husband were rather casually told that their baby's umbilical cord was missing one artery. Her disorientation and anxiety that day deepened her ability to empathize with those who are ill. In "A Day in the Clinic," she describes how a language barrier left her unable to effectively comfort an Asian man with a brain tumor. In the especially moving "Terminal Thoughts," Ofri intuits that a woman's signature on a Do Not Resuscitate order and her refusal of dialysis were rooted in depression. Ofri reworks her pain medications and extracts a promise that the patient will stay on dialysis. The patient will not be cured, but Ofri's goal is not to provide happy endings; rather, she aims to wed compassion to medical training and knowledge, to recall her ongoing struggles to understand the sick and to make their lives more bearable. (Apr.)
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From Booklist

Ofri supported a postgraduate semisabbatical by taking temporary assignments, filling in where needed at a variety of hospitals and clinics as she traveled the country. The experience, originally planned as a quasi vacation to recover from the rigors of medical residency, resulted in much more than she bargained for. Indeed, Ofri learned more--the incidental findings of the title--about the softer emotional underbelly of medicine than she had picked up clinically. One can't help wondering whether this exceptional series of introspective essays on her experiences serves more to remind the Bellevue physician, as she now is, of patients' basic humanity than to record that humanity for posterity. The musings seem drawn from her very marrow and too personally raw to be originally intended for broad distribution. "In the end," she concludes, "medicine will always be about one patient and one physician together in one room, connecting through the most basic of communication systems: touch." Good writing + good doctor = good reading. Donna Chavez
Copyright © American Library Association. All rights reserved --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

More About the Author

Danielle Ofri, MD, PhD is the author of the critically acclaimed "What Doctors Feel: How Emotions Affect the Practice of Medicine" (Beacon Press, 2013). She is an associate professor of medicine at New York University School of Medicine and has cared for patients at Bellevue Hospital for over two decades. Her other books are Singular Intimacies: Becoming a Doctor at Bellevue, Incidental Findings: Lessons from my Patients in the Art of Medicine, and her latest book, Medicine in Translation: Journeys With My Patients. Ofri is a regular contributor to the New York Times' Well blog as well as the New York Times' "Science Times" section. She is the editor-in-chief of the Bellevue Literary Review.

Danielle lives in New York City with three endogenously caffeinated kids, an aging lab-mutt, and the forever challenges of the cello.

Visit her website at http://danielleofri.com/.

Find her author fan page on Facebook at
https://www.facebook.com/pages/Danielle-Ofri-Writer/78285974468

Photo Credits: Joon Park and John Abbot

Customer Reviews

4.5 out of 5 stars
5 star
17
4 star
5
3 star
0
2 star
2
1 star
0
See all 24 customer reviews
It is amazing to me that all the stories are true.
Rachel S.
While the medical details are handled effectively, the heart of the book, in every sense, is Dr. Ofri's encounters with her patients as individuals.
zenpicker
I have learned a lot by reading this book and highly recommend it.
cindy

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

23 of 24 people found the following review helpful By Lynn Harnett VINE VOICE on May 10, 2005
Format: Hardcover
Dr. Ofri's first book of essays, "Singular Intimacies," was a soul-searching, thought-provoking self-portrait of becoming a doctor at a busy, inner-city hospital, New York's Bellevue. Ofri is still at Bellevue as an attending physician and editor of the Bellevue Literary Review.

This second reflective and graceful book of essays ranges over her experiences since - from far-flung temp positions during a post-qualifying travel break to her own rude awakening as a patient during her first pregnancy. But the bulk of the book revolves around Bellevue; the month-long rotations on hospital wards and the ongoing clinic practice which is her base. In the hospital rotations her interaction with a patient is intense, but finite. She prefers the clinic where the people are less sick, but the relationship is ongoing.

The book opens with Ofri's first experience as a patient dismayed by a busy doctor's delivery of fear-inducing news, the intimidation inherent in the relationship, and the medical professional's casual use of jolting jargon, like "high risk." In one of the last essays, she delivers her baby and discovers the reality of being an ordinary patient:

"I had no idea how much shame and humiliation are part of the experience: from the horrid gowns that never cover enough, to the exposure of some of the most private and embarrassing bodily functions, to the smells and sights which one is forced to wallow in, to the helplessness and inability to assert one's control." Ofri does get to exert control though, when eventually she succumbs to the temptation to throw her weight around - "I am an attending physician on faculty here" - and service improves dramatically.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
12 of 12 people found the following review helpful By C. Azad on December 28, 2005
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I rarely review books on Amazon because my writing always seems so abysmal in comparison to the work I'm reviewing. However, I really want to tell everyone what a wonderful book this is. I was deeply touched and found myself crying over several essays, wondering how my husband (a physician) manages. Ofri is a very good writer, and I thoroughly enjoyed this book. My only complaint was that it ended too soon, so I'm off to go buy "Singular Intimacies."
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
13 of 14 people found the following review helpful By Jenny Park on May 2, 2005
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Recently I had finished reading SINGULAR INTIMACIES by Ofri and I was so disappointed that the book had to end. When I found out that she had written a new book, I picked it up right away. INCIDENTAL FINDINGS is an easier read in some ways because Ofri is now an attending physician at Bellevue. Her first book was a graphic depiction of a young doctor's education. Both books are exquisitely written, and I look forward to Ofri's third book (hopefully there will be one). I recommend her books to anyone who ever considered medicine as a profession, anyone who has considered any of the healing professions.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By M. J. weinig on August 27, 2005
Format: Hardcover
This is not only a compelling read, but a telling read. Should be read by all those who are caregivers for others. Well worth reading D.Ofri's other work as well.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By ML on August 16, 2005
Format: Hardcover
Dr. Ofri is an amazing writer. She is able to turn her most intimate interactions with patients into chapters that make the reader think and learn. She is able to share all aspects of medicine, not only the rewarding experiences, but also the stresses associated with her career. By reading her writings, one can begin to understand what is necessary to be a successful doctor, a strong doctor-patient relationship.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By A .J. Casper on July 30, 2005
Format: Hardcover
The book has a remarkable opening, and the writing is wistful and somewhat entertaining. Danielle Ofri writes about the stress and challenges of working in a major city hospital like Bellevue, New York. It's clear that there is a dynamic, a connectedness between Dr. Ofri and her patients.

There are many challenges and decisions faced in medicine. How, for example, would one deal with a patient with chronic renal problems who wants to be taken off dialysis to die a slow death? And how does one tell an incarcerated patient with advanced diabetes that they are only going to get worse?

The book "Incidental Findings" contains details about her work and travels to Florida, New England, and Mexico. Ofri also raises many questions on ethics in the book. In one of the chapters, she seeks to find common ground with a patient seeking an abortion. Ofri herself had an abortion at 17. This also brings in the hardships of trying to keep one's personal life from the profession.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Midwest Book Review on September 4, 2005
Format: Hardcover
Orphi's postgraduate life involved taking temporary assignments at hospitals and clinics as she traveled the country to recover from her medical residency - during that process she learned much about patients and humanity. Incidental Findings: Lessons From My Patients In The Art Of Medicine shows how she becomes a better healer when she sheds her white coat and enters the hospital as a patient herself, when she travels to rural communities and small towns, and when she learns from her patients - even those she dislikes. A vivid story of patients and changing relationships evolves.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Rachel S. on May 12, 2009
Format: Paperback
A beautifully written collection of brave insights into Dr Ofri's world as an MD at Bellevue Hospital in NYC. I love her brave honesty. It is amazing to me that all the stories are true. I felt privileged to gain access to her inner thoughts as she treats challenging patients.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Customer Images

Most Recent Customer Reviews

Search