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Include Me Out: My Life from Goldwyn to Broadway Paperback – May 13, 2008


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 288 pages
  • Publisher: St. Martin's Griffin; 1st edition (May 13, 2008)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0312357745
  • ISBN-13: 978-0312357740
  • Product Dimensions: 9.1 x 5.9 x 0.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 10.4 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (45 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,124,206 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

With a title taken from Samuel Goldwyn's famed malaprop catchphrase, this polished and perceptive memoir etches a scintillating portrait of life inside Tinseltown soundstages where "nothing was real except anxiety, insecurity and fear." Granger notes that only three of his films (Senso, Strangers on a Train and They Live by Night) gave him a "sense of pride" as he struggled to free himself from his Goldwyn contract in order to do theater. Granger arranges his life into three acts: Act I begins with a 17-year-old Granger being discovered by Goldwyn's casting director, his first films and his WWII navy hitch in Hawaii. In Act II he recalls working with Hitchcock and Nicholas Ray. By Act III, Granger is on the East Coast doing theater and live television. Contrasting fame and obscurity, Granger regales the reader with anecdotes about the people in his past, recollecting relationships with Ava Gardner, Arthur Laurents and Shelley Winters: "She adored being a star. I hated it." The book has a huge celebrity cast, from Mike Todd, Rita Hayworth and Cornelia Otis Skinner to Leonard Bernstein and Peggy Guggenheim. Granger and Calhoun write with a stylish and iridescent flair, in this autobiography's anecdotal 100 short chapters. 16-page b&w photo insert. (Feb. 6)
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

About the Author

Farley Granger and Robert Calhoun live in New York City.


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Customer Reviews

It is superficaial, banal, boring, and at times even annoying.
Nicholas Groth
My recommendation: for anyone who loves movie star biographies this is a very good one, easy to read and entertaining.
Paul A. Tassone
All in all, this is an essential classic film star autobiography.
A.C. Robinson

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

71 of 74 people found the following review helpful By Paul A. Tassone on March 8, 2007
Format: Hardcover
I've always enjoyed watching the films of Farley Granger. And, I always wondered what became of him after he turned his back on Hollywood after a decade in the movies. This book provides the answers and is a very enjoyable reading experience.

What I gained from reading this memoir is that Mr Granger is a man who enjoys the finer things of life. His description of trips he took, parties he attended, people he encountered and even meals he ate is detailed and quite fascinating. He presents a portrait of a professional actor, a man serious about his art and his profession. And, of special interest are his remembrances of three of his most celebrated movies ("Rope", "Strangers On A Train" and "Senso.") For anyone who loves movies, the details of how these films were made will prove entertaining and enlightening.

The book is very readable with plenty of celebrity gossip and details of many famous people that he encountered along the way. Names like Judy Garland, Tyrone Power, Barbara Stanwyck, Shelley Winters and many others are featured. Though all are discussed respectfully, I was pleased that he didn't love everyone with Polly Bergen and Danny Kaye being two co-workers that he didn't care for. Finally, the reasons for turning his back on Hollywood in the mid 1950's and what he did following this is detailed answering the questions I always wondered about concerning Mr Granger.

My recommendation: for anyone who loves movie star biographies this is a very good one, easy to read and entertaining. I would happily recommend it.
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32 of 33 people found the following review helpful By Valley Gay Press Book Review on May 7, 2007
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Valley Gay Press Book Reviewer: Liz Bradbury
"Count Me Out" by Farley Granger with Robert Calhoun

Farley Granger's detailed and well written autobiography chronicles his journey from Hollywood to the New York stage by way of exciting European cities and early TV theatricals, but it's the people he meets or parties with (or sleeps with) that make this book fascinating. And the honesty about his same-sex experiences, especially in the first half of the book is refreshing. Perhaps he's more veiled in the second half because more of the characters are still alive.

Each of the detailed remembrances sets a scene that makes you feel as though you were there, if you know who the people are he's talking about. Granger dishes on big stars like Barbara Stanwyck, Joan Crawford and Danny Kaye, and flays the foolishness of studio mogul Sam Goldwyn. But when Granger talks about how interesting it was meeting Kay Medford and Maurice Evans when he was in the navy during the war, and when he mentions bumping into Stella Adler and how she was an important influence in his life, though I happen to know who those people are, I couldn't help but wonder whether those younger than I and with less interest and awareness of the period, would be lost.

Well, so what...this is a book for middle-aged movie queens who live for 1950s Hollywood and New York theater dish. I certainly fit into that category.
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47 of 52 people found the following review helpful By Amy Albani on March 12, 2007
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
In the interest of full disclosure, I must admit that as a teenager -- many years ago -- I was an avid fan of the handsome young actor. And now I'm an even more avid fan of his memoir, which I found impossible to put down! At times, I'd wondered "what ever happened to Farley Granger," as I'm sure many others did, too. In this absolutely fascinating book, we find out just about everything that ever happened to him. It's extremely well-written, with a refreshing lack of vanity -- and although he "tells all" about his bisexuality and the many liaisons he had over the years with famous people, it's done in a non-prurient way. The stories are subtly sexy, much like Mr. Granger's screen persona. The reader will come away feeling that he has really gotten to know this underrated actor -- and happy that he has found his true love, the stage, after the years of working for Sam Goldwyn in some rather underwhelming movies. Bravo, Mr. Granger -- after reading your book, my teenage crush has turned into the real thing!
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36 of 43 people found the following review helpful By Nicholas Groth on March 19, 2007
Format: Hardcover
When I read an autobiography, I like to feel I have come to know and to have enjoyed meeting the author. What did I learn from "Include Me Out? Nothing very much other than (1) apparently Mr. Granger has not had a meal that he has forgotten! You have to search far and wide to find a page on which food and/or drink are not mentioned. (2) He must have a problem with short-term memory, since he keeps repeating himself in this slender volume. For example, he tells a story about Richard Rogers and a deleted song from "Babes In Arms" on page 99 and then repeates the same story on page 205; ditto with a story of Peggy Guggenheim's bequest stipulation that her art collection remain in the city of Venice which first appears on page 148 and then again on page 170. (3) His relationships seem superficial: Although he states "I fell in love with Janice [Rule]...and before long we were making wedding plans." Only four lines later "it was time to move on with our lives and careers, not with married life." Most of his affairs with women seem to be "one night stands" and although an article in the 3/27/07 issue of THE ADVOCATE states that "he has been happily partnered with TV producer Robert Calhoun...for the past 45 years", Farley Granger never identifies himself as gay or describes his relationship to Robert Calhoun [co-author of INCLUDE ME OUT] with any passion. In fact, he leaves the reader with the impression that they are neighbors rather than lovers. Nowhere in the book does he talk about pursuing anyone sexually. Passively, life happens to him, instead. (4) Some of the things he writes about just don't make sense. For example, he describes a restaurant (food again!) in Venice where the gondoliers hung out: "It was for men only...Read more ›
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