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Incredible Cover Up Paperback – June 1, 1975


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Product Details

  • Paperback
  • Publisher: Omega Pubns (June 1975)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0931608066
  • ISBN-13: 978-0931608063
  • Product Dimensions: 8.1 x 5.4 x 0.4 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 8 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (16 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #379,026 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

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38 of 40 people found the following review helpful By "danbrown@hiwaay.net" on September 12, 2000
Format: Paperback
This is an excellent book on the fascinating origin of the pre-tribulational rapture view of eschatology, also called dispensationalism. The author has done some fine historical research and his skill as an investigative reporter shows. If Baptists knew that their pet eschatological doctrine originated with a 15-year-old charismatic, tongues-speaking, woman "prophet" in 1830, they would probably drop their dispensational views like a hotcake! The book is not very flattering of John Nelson Darby, who is often attributed with originating dispensationalism. One explanation for Darby's glaring omission of mentioning Margaret MacDonald's rapture "prophecy" is that he probably did not want to be associated with the charismaticism of the day. Although the author holds to a premillennial post-trib rapture (chiliast) view, the book is still a valuable resource for reformed Christians holding either an amillennial or postmillennial view. Both in America in the early 1900s and in Scotland in 1830, the primary and possibly sole justification for the revival of the charismatic gifts of tongues and prophecy was the eminent return of Christ. And how did they know His return was eminent? Because they prophesied it!
The author shows the MacDonald clan of two older brothers and three sisters to have a reputation of leading godly and humble lives, in spite of their charismatic errors. One explanation for this inconsistency is that several years prior to the 1830 charismatic experience, the twin elder brothers, acting as heads of the household (their parents had died), began leading the family in twice-daily family worship.
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34 of 37 people found the following review helpful By "shofar" on May 21, 2000
Format: Paperback
In the foreward, Dr. James McKeever, referring to the author, states that "some of his anger shows through this book." I am a reader who is normally very sensitive to the attitude of the author as he expresses himself through his writing. But as I read through the book, I did not find it as irreverent as I had expected. In fact, I did not even find it as disrespectful as some other fervently argued theological works. Of course there are several things the author could have done to make the book sound more like objective reporting. For instance, he might have simply titled the book "The Origin Of The Pretribulation Rapture" to sound less aggressive, etc. We should keep in mind however that the author is not known primarily as a theologian, and he does not write or sound like one, so we should not judge the book as though it were written by one. He sounds more like a regular guy writing his thoughts down. This may be either refeshing or unbearable depending on your mind set.
One of the things that we should also keep in mind is that the book, which is comprised of two of his earlier works which were published in 1973 and 1974, is somewhat outdated so far as the "cover-up" theme goes. Today in the year 2000, I don't think that there are many who have seriously studied the pretribulation rapture who have not heard of Margaret Macdonald. It is not something that is kept as a secret. My initial thought was, what real difference does this information make to the theory, since we have the facts of the theory and we need to check them out against the authority of the scriptures anyway. I do not hold to the pretrib theory, and yet, I wonder why it is so important to know about an alledged cover-up that took place 170 years ago.
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17 of 18 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on November 19, 1999
Format: Paperback
The Anti-"Left Behind." Learning the history of where the pre-trib idea really came from was a BIG help to me. If you're at all open to considering that this idea is not at all Scriptural, I highly recommend this book about the truth of the historical birth of the pre-trib rapture theory.
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19 of 21 people found the following review helpful By Shawn Tzu on March 8, 2000
Format: Paperback
As a Catholic I had never really lent much creedence to the Pretribulation Rapture theory knowing that it did not exist prior to the time of John N Darby in the 19th century. However, in discussing these matters with a number of Protestants who adhere to this view, I came to the realization that there were people who really took this view seriously and even seemed to allow it to (in some manner) permeate their worldview. After all, if the saints are all going to be "raptured" up before the Tribulation, than this could indeed have perilous consequences if this belief was a false one (which it indeed it). Knowing that there are actually Fundamentalists involved with Israel who are actively working to help re-establish the old Mosaic sacrificial system over there (in the hopes that the Anti Christ will then come), this is dangerous indeed because these people believe that they will somehow be spared of the problems and sufferings that will come in that day and age. It can also lead (indirectly) to irresponsibility in civic functions, etc. because, the worse things get (or so the theory goes), the closer we are to the Tribulation period of which "we shall be spared." This is a VERY dangerous mindset to have.
Because of this, I decided to obtain some books to better understand the origins of this theory both for my own education and hopefully to better explain these matters to others who adhere to this view.
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