Buy Used
$3.78
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: Book very good throughout. Library stamp on inside cover front and back
Add to Cart
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more

My Incredibly Wonderful, Miserable Life: An Anti-Memoir Hardcover


See all 4 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from Collectible from
Hardcover
"Please retry"
$0.01 $0.01 $23.00

Customers Who Viewed This Item Also Viewed

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Big Spring Books
Editors' Picks in Spring Releases
Ready for some fresh reads? Browse our picks for Big Spring Books to please all kinds of readers.

Product Details

  • Hardcover: 304 pages
  • Publisher: Pocket; First Printing edition (July 22, 2008)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1416572570
  • ISBN-13: 978-1416572572
  • Product Dimensions: 8.6 x 5.7 x 1.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 13.6 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 3.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (130 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,522,737 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Booklist

Despite those legendary auricles, when it came to being a father, Leonard Nimoy wasn’t all ears. In fact, he was seldom around. That’s the message in his son’s “anti-memoir.” In the years prior to Star Trek, the elder Nimoy, a tough kid born to Russian immigrant parents, was always hustling for work. His son relished the rare moments they spent together, though dad was often distant and drenched in booze. Nimoy’s tale recounts the dissolution of his own marriage, his marijuana and alcohol addictions, and his moderately successful career as a television director. He’s at his best describing efforts to stay connected with his two children (his discussions with teenage daughter Maddy are especially poignant). Less interesting are his trials and tribulations as a newly single dad in Los Angeles. In the end, the author’s reefer madness seems mild compared to the dysfunctional displays documented in more memorable memoirs like Burroughs’ Dry. This is tame stuff but sure to appeal to readers seeking a glimpse of life with a pop icon pop. --Allison Block

Review

"Mr. Spock's soul-searching son struggles with a classic midlife crisis and emerges from his iconic dad's shadow... a touching, humorous, and in the end wise account of how a Hollywood brat transcended lifelong resent of his father by learning to accept without blame."-- "Kirkus Review"

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

Not that the book started off bad--I just didn't know where it was going.
Esther B.
The chapters are a bit too short and the way the book is put together is a little jumpy and disjointed.
Stephanie
Adam Nimoy has written a poignant and all-too-real memoir of his life that is full of pathos and wit.
California Greg

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

43 of 48 people found the following review helpful By D. Summerfield on September 21, 2008
Format: Hardcover Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
Adam Nimoy, son of legendary television star Leonard Nimoy, is one angry guy. His new book, labeled an "Anti-Memoir" is ostensibly about the recovery from a down-hill slide of a long-time drug and alcohol addict who just happens to be the son of the actor who played "Star Trek's" Mr. Spock. Unfortunately in his attempt to convey the stylish angst of Augusten Burroughs( Running with Scissors: A Memoir; Dry: A Memoir) or David Sedaris( Naked; Me Talk Pretty One Day), he falls far short of their twisted, jaundiced and always hilarious views of the surreal side of life.

As an author, Nimoy just doesn't have Burroughs' or Sedaris' sense of the ridiculous, nor their gift of wit. He takes himself so seriously that even when he seems to be poking fun at his own foibles, he comes across as whiny. The vibe that he gives off is one of a man who feels like life has handed him a rotten deal and that other people -- his father, his mother, his ex-wife, his children and even his friends and potential date-mates -- are really to blame.

In deciding to read a memoir by the child of a famous person, the reader wants to get some idea of what that celebrity is like. Who better to tell us than someone who lived intimately for many years with the celeb?
Read more ›
9 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
11 of 11 people found the following review helpful By Sheryl Spencer on November 2, 2008
Format: Hardcover Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
I use to love watching Star Trek and was a fan of Leonard Nimoy's, so I had high hopes to start reading this book by his son, Adam Nimoy.

The book sounded interesting enough, since Adam had recounted his troubled life with a humorous aspect and gave the reader a glimpse at what it was like to grow up in a famous household. But, my expectations were too high. I can't say that this book completely dashed my hopes of being interesting, but it certainly wasn't what I was expecting either.

When I'm reading a book about a persons life, I expect it to be written in somewhat of a chronological order, but this book is far from it. How it seems to me that Adam wrote this book, was that he sat down and simply wrote about whichever event came into his thoughts at the moment.

This book starts off with Adam humorously recounting what he went through to get this book published, but then the chapters that follow are just random excerpts of his life. He does talk about his growing up years, his special moments with his children, his marriage and divorce, his drug addiction and his trials and tribulations, but it's hard to follow since he goes back and forth between the years. Even the pictures that are inserted throughout this book don't match with the point in time that he's writing about.

I give Adam credit for wanting to write a book about his own life and not simply write about his "life with Leonard", but I think if he would have taken the time to arrange this book a little bit better, this book would be a lot better to read.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Larry Commons VINE VOICE on November 17, 2008
Format: Hardcover Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
I bought this because I'm a huge fan of the original STAR TREK and admire Leonard Nimoy's work. I remember seeing "Directed by Adam Nimoy" on an episode of STAR TREK: THE NEXT GENERATION in the early '90s and expected this autobiography would have plenty of behind-the-scenes anecdotes.

It doesn't, but what's in the book is still pretty interesting. It's mostly tales of Adam's family and his struggles with substance abuse. That doesn't sound like anything new, I know, but Adam is a natural writer and comes across as likable and humble. There are some rare photographs throughout the book, including some from the original STAR TREK days.

Where the book lacks: details about Adam's TV directing experiences, and how exactly that career ended.

Worth getting if you want a quick & often witty read. Just don't expect much in the way of STAR TREK.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Morrigan Alexandros VINE VOICE on November 12, 2008
Format: Hardcover Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
This is a wonderfully honest and heartwarming book. Adam Nimoy is the son of Leonard Nimoy (Star Trek's Spock). But this book is not about growing up as his father son; rather, it is about being a father and maintaining a good relationship with his children while going through a divorce, battling a marijuana and alcohol addiction, his own relationship with his father (there are few and vague mentions of this) and finding a job.

The book is never dark or gritty or filled with lurid and scandalous details, it is simply the author learning to be honest with himself. The book is comprised a anecdotes (sort of chapters) lived by the writer whose main theme is that of accepting to move on with his life. The book is a bit self-absorbed but it is honest in its writing and feelings. It is obvious that the writer has not worked out through all of his "angst", even at the end, but it is something he is trying to do.

The style of writing does seem young (adorned with Nimoy seeming to have the mind of an adolescent in terms of women) and like that of a starting writer. It is disjointed and without any clear timeline, which I did not mind that much. The book reads like a journal and it may be just that: a series of anecdotes Adam Nimoy wrote for himself and decided to publish. I was not expecting much when I got this book. I chose it because of the title (it was a bit ingenious). Still, I enjoyed the book. It was easy and fast to read.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews

Search
ARRAY(0xaa7d92f4)