Incunabula

November 29, 1993 | Format: MP3

$9.49
Song Title
Time
Popularity  
30
1
3:18
30
2
8:00
30
3
6:55
30
4
3:33
30
5
5:24
30
6
9:02
30
7
7:48
30
8
6:32
30
9
11:17
30
10
7:16
30
11
8:55

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Product Details

  • Original Release Date: November 29, 1993
  • Label: Warp Records
  • Copyright: (C) 1993 Warp Records Limited
  • Total Length: 1:18:00
  • Genres:
  • ASIN: B001E43GWA
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (61 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #91,518 Paid in Albums (See Top 100 Paid in Albums)

Customer Reviews

Great sounding in the beginning though.
Impreza22B
Most of the tracks on this are really good, the sounds are very electronic, and futuristic sounding.
Nick Martinez
You can put more than 30 hours of music on a single CDR.
Rykre

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

48 of 48 people found the following review helpful By Ian Vance on January 30, 2005
Format: Audio CD
Released with virtually no fanfare or hype in 1993, Autechre's full length debut *Incunabla* is now considered the watershed pinpoint of early experimental electronica, `pure' IDM ambient at its finest. Sheffield natives Rob Brown and Sean Booth, childhood hip-hop aficionados and graffiti artists, began with this album a career trajectory in sonic manipulation that, in reflection, is as baffling as it is monumentus, the scope of which must be calculated in non-verbal experience, rather than the usual superlative expressionism (though we try, we really do...). *Incunabula*, Latin for `cradle' or `origin', is a fitting title for this sublime gem; when directly compared to Autchre's more recent releases like *Confield*, very little similarity can be discerned, at least superficially. But when taken in context, record to record, a journey of mind-boggling proportions unfolds, and the seeds of Autechre's eventual exploration of chaos-within-order sound structure can be found on this, the `birth' record, by far the most accessible and least-demanding work of Ae's oeuvre...and, consequently, considered by many as their best.

Whichever Autechre you prefer - order or chaos - *Incunabula* stands as one of the catchiest `cold' albums in existence. The gray tones of the cover visually distinguish the overall color-scheme of the entire album: in the mind's eye, I am constantly reminded of overcast skies, windswept mountains clad in ice; dull chrome and greasy steel; the pall of industrial fumigation and the necroshine of a neon-drenched cityscape. Fans of Autechre often describe this music as the closest aural equivalent to the Song of Machines, all clicks and bleeps and grinding gears, mathematical equations hardwired into sonic representation.
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35 of 36 people found the following review helpful By loteq on March 3, 2000
Format: Audio CD
Autechre's debut album gets excellent reviews for good reason. Entering the UK charts at #1, it also was a well-deserved commercial success. Still, there some distinct musical differences to Autechre's later-era output. The rhythm constructions are more fragile, subdued, and fluid, and tracks like "Bike" and "Lowride" even expose Autechre's hip hop roots. "Incunabula" comes up with very beautiful and aesthetic melodies which never seem to be trite, formless, or trashy. Rather allied to '70s electronic pioneers like Brian Eno, Kraftwerk, and Tangerine Dream, "Incunabula" is also a work with concept character. From "Eggshell" on, Autechre take you on a plesant, neverending journey through time and space. Listen to "Windwind" and imagine a moonlit mountain range covered with shimmering ice and snow. I never thought that electronic music could have such an emotional power and quality. This is excellent trance music without the boredom of many other new age or ambient records. Unlike many of Autechre's other efforts, this album is palatable for everyone, even for people who usually don't care about techno music.
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16 of 17 people found the following review helpful By Impreza22B on March 6, 2005
Format: Audio CD
Electronica has got a bad rep for being unemotional and annoying. Autechre is one of those groups/artists which shatters that stereotype with rythmic, intelligent, and beautiful electronica music (the others that I am aware of that are GREAT are Aphex Twin, Boards of Canada, and Squarepusher). Autechre's music may not be extremely easy to listen to, but after you listen to any of their albums 2 or 3 times you relize just how beautiful and flowing it is. In my opinion, Incunabula represents the pinnacle of Autechre's music. Unlike many of their other music, Incunabula is filled with old-school electronica sounds, which is why some people say it sounds out-dated or simple, but in all it is a reason why it is so great. Incunabula's music relies more on percussion and hip-hop beats, which is different but gives the album a sound that is actually rare. As with most of Autechre's music, Incunabula is very mathematical, and its beats are perfectly synchronized. At first, it does sound like it was put together with elementary software using old, out-dated sounds. But once you get used to the album, you see the hidden beauty. Every song in this album has its own characteristic, but all are great. The only song I really grown to enjoy is Bronchus 2.

1. Kalpol Introl- 8/10- Probably the most inriguing sounding song of the album. It doesnt rely on the hip-hop percussion beats like the rest of the songs do, as it uses the strange flowing sounds that are more common in electronica today. The thing is it just drags on without getting somewhere significant. Great sounding in the beginning though.

2. Bike- 9/10- This song sets the ambient/hip-hop beats that are common throughout the album. Not the most entertaining song of the album, but is very good nonetheless.

3.
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12 of 12 people found the following review helpful By Marblehead Johnson VINE VOICE on September 12, 2009
Format: Audio CD
It's strange to read such apathetic reviews of "Incunabula", so I felt compelled to try and explain why this album was, and still is, such a landmark in the world of electronic music.
To truly understand why this album is so brilliant is to realize when it was released. It came out in November, 1993, nearly 16 years ago. I was 21 years old then, and there simply was no music on the earth that sounded like this. There has been tons of electronic music that's been released since then that follow the mold of Autechre, and that sound eventually got slapped the lazy label of the cringe worthy "IDM" tag. Aphex Twin preceded this album by one year with his "Selected Ambient Works" album, but it was a different beast. What makes this album such a special moment in electronic music history was its flawless effort in taking the emotion of Detroit techno and molding it with newer, and distinctly British, elements such as rave culture and ambient house. I have thousands of electronic records in my collection, and I can proudly say that "Incunabula" holds a massively special place in my heart. Acts that I love now such as Boards Of Canada, Two Lone Swordsmen, and just about any artist on the Warp label owe a huge debt to Autechre and this album in particular. When you hear the ravey, junglist sounds of Autechre's debit single "Cavity Job", and compare "Incunabula" to it, you realize what a huge evolutionary step they took. Autechre definitely used electro and ambient sounds to influence them with this album, but they paved a distinctly original path as they mixed in what was to become THE sound of "IDM", or whatever you want to call it. Richard James refers to this kind of music as "braindance", and it's a far more appropriate title.
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