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Indecent Exposure: A True Story of Hollywood and Wall Street (Collins Business Essentials) Paperback – November 7, 2006


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Product Details

  • Series: Collins Business Essentials
  • Paperback: 576 pages
  • Publisher: HarperBusiness; Reprint edition (November 7, 2006)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0060508159
  • ISBN-13: 978-0060508159
  • Product Dimensions: 5.3 x 1.3 x 8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.1 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (13 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #265,284 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

David McClintick, an investigative reporter at the Wall Street Journal for eleven years, is an award-winning author and journalist. His other books include Swordfish and Stealing from the Rich. He lives in New York and Los Angeles.


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Customer Reviews

A very well written book.
Lemon
This book gives details of David Begelman the head man at Columbia Pictures getting caught forging Cliff Robertson's name on a check.
Melvin Hunt
I read this book when it was first published years ago and I'm reading it again.
"stephpeskie"

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

47 of 49 people found the following review helpful By Dennis Foley on June 5, 1998
Format: Mass Market Paperback
David Begelman would never have been exposed as the crook he was without the dogged, principled determination of Cliff Robertson to get to the bottom of corruption at the top levels of Hollywood. This excellent book documents Robertson's heroic efforts to get at the truth -- for which he was blackballed by the Hollywood establishment for years. Cliff once said to me: "Of all the things in my life I'm proud of -- if I'm proud at all -- it's not winning the best actor Oscar or Emmy; it's my part in bringing down that crook Begelman."

But perhaps the book is most valuable for its exposure of the top echelon of Hollywood -- people with lots of money and no taste; people who know nothing whatever about movies. And could care less. I hope this book is reprinted soon. It is timeless.
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11 of 11 people found the following review helpful By Margaret Bartley on December 24, 2007
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This is not really a tale of embezzlement and disgrace - it is the store of power struggles between the Board of Directors for Columbia Studios, who were clearly had personal loyalty in their underlings as their top priority, and the CEO, Alan Hirschfield, trying to do what he needed to do to save the studio.

I don't have access to people at this level, so I appreciate the peeping-Tom aspect of viewing the thought processes and actions of people who normally hide behind lawyers, secretaries, and call-screeners.

The author obviously interviewed many many people to put this book together, and I appreciate how he reported on the media coverage, as well. I never really thought of how people manipulate the news as part of the story, but course it is.

The book is like a newspaper story in that it is filled with information, but the narrative reads like a novel - very easy to read. The author does a good job of developing story-lines, so we have a sense of completeness, and a sense of an overview, while also sprinkling the famous names and the glamour that makes Hollywood so compelling to people.

I've never understood why Hollywood turns out bad movies month after month, year after year, when it is so easy to tell from the beginning that a movie is going to be awful. Why make awful movies?

This book doesn't directly address that issue, but it shows how irresponsible and irrational the leading powers that control Hollywood on both coasts are, and how corrupt the whole system is. It's obvious that normal things like making a good product become irrelevent to their attention span.

I guess it's not really corruption, if everyone knows it's happening, and it's just a way of getting things done.
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17 of 19 people found the following review helpful By "stephpeskie" on April 8, 2004
Format: Paperback
David Begelman, powerful head of a studio thinks he is above the law, until an actor by the name of Cliff Robertson exposes him. This book is a well written tale of immorality in a town known for it's lack of scruples. Hollywood insiders should not be surprised at this tale, but I was. The check Begelman forged was for a small amount. The man made more than that in a month. The book exposes the reasons why a man who had it all, would choose to commit such a crime and fall from grace. I was quite disappointed by Robertson's treatment by Hollywood's hierarchy when he was the victim, not Begelman. But it proves just how far studios will go to protect the bottom line. I read this book when it was first published years ago and I'm reading it again. The list of books I will read more than once is a short one. I highly recommend it.
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14 of 16 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on November 26, 1997
Format: Mass Market Paperback
First things first. This book only gets an "8" becuase I realize some people could care less about studio executives in Hollywood(unless their name is Julia Phillips or Steven Speilberg, both of whom make appearences in the book) but it truly is a ten. It is truly an amazing tale: what starts out as a theft of less then a $100, 000 becomes a battle for corporate power. David Begelman, the man behind the scandal, isn't even the main character of the book. It's Alan Hirschfield trying, desperately, to do the responible business decisions he was hired to do and is one of only a few major players in this detailed history to remain a completely sympathetic person by story's end. Indecent Exposure is truly is one of great true life American Dramas I have ever read. (Review by Michael Goodman)
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Lemon VINE VOICE on March 30, 2009
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Over twenty years after its original publication, this book is still a compelling page turner that I could not put down. Actor Cliff Robertson unwittingly uncovers an embezzler, which ultimately fuels massive incompetence and repeated mistakes that almost destroy Columbia Pictures. While we are now lamenting the greed, corruption, and incompetence that lead to our current financial crisis, it's interesting to note that Wall Street has always suffered from foolishness. A very well written book.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By L. Alfaro on May 28, 2008
Format: Mass Market Paperback
I just finished this book, and Cliff Robertson is actually a very minor character. In fact, the subject of him being "blackballed" is barely mentioned. (It receives one paragraph in the Epilogue.) Robertson was the first person to suspect something was amiss at Columbia, but the book is actually about the power struggle between the President of Columbia, Alan Hirschfield, and the controlling interests of the shareholders, led primarily by Herbert Allen Jr. This is a long book, but it was so riveting that I found it difficult to put down. It is really well written, even if it does not paint any of the characters in a terribly sympathetic light. I can't help but think that if Hirschfield had shown more backbone in the beginning and stuck by his decision to fire the check-forger Begelman instead of caving in to Allen's demands, none of this epic battle would have happened.
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