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India Untouched: The Forgotten Face of Rural Poverty Hardcover – January 1, 2010

ISBN-13: 978-1594111228 ISBN-10: 1594111227 Edition: 1st

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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 368 pages
  • Publisher: Abraham George; 1st edition (January 1, 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1594111227
  • ISBN-13: 978-1594111228
  • Product Dimensions: 9.1 x 1.1 x 6.1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.6 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (25 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,066,468 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

I see what a single man’s vision can do. I complement Mr. George for his incisive understanding of the situation. --I. K. Gujral, Former Prime Minister of India

A remarkable story of what one man can accomplish with vision and determination.

Ralph Nader, Consumer Advocate and Environmentalist

Dr. Abraham M. George has written an important and moving story about one of the world's most critical issues. --Alex S. Jones, Director, Shorenstein Center on the Press, Politics and Public Policy, Harvard University

Abraham George has precisely the kind of imagination that we should all want to emulate. --Thomas L. Friedman, Foreign Affairs Columnist, The New York Times

About the Author

A former Indian Army artillery officer with a PhD in Business Administration from NYU, Abraham George founded a software company, authored three books on international finance, served on the board of a global investment bank and consulted for over 100 Fortune-500 companies. Today, he shuttles between New Jersey and Bangalore directing the humanitarian projects of The George Foundation in India.

Customer Reviews

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I encourage all of you to read this book.
elizabeth
This is a must get book for any India-American or anyone that is interested in the topic of social poverty and the different strategies of combating the problem.
Dular
This book tells their story and does so with a sense of urgency, helping us see that it is indeed possible to make a difference to improve humanities condition.
David W. Arndt

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

12 of 12 people found the following review helpful By Raghuveer on February 8, 2006
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
This is an important book for anyone who thinks 'educating people' is a magic wand that will somehow wipe away poverty and other evils in the third-world. It is unbelievable how many barriers exist in India even for someone who wants to provide unselfish help. This book is a reality check for those who, by watching some sappy movies, think that things can be changed easily by mouthing platitudes and by making token donations to NGOs.

How readable is the book? It reads very well when the author talks about his personal experiences in detail. His difficulties while he went about setting up his school are a real eye-opener to how things really are. But the chapters become cliched when he starts generalizing; you feels like you have heard similar talk before and probably have.

But George Abraham is sincere and has done what many of us think we should do. For that alone, he deserves a lot of praise and support.
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11 of 11 people found the following review helpful By Wes Bernard on May 18, 2005
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
India is an interesting place, and a land of extremes. Nestled among the large cities and prosperous transformation is an entire culture of have nots. This book tells of the have nots in a moving, unedited fashion. A very sad depiction of real life in modern India but one that is filled with hope. I must admit, sometimes it was a tough read, but never boring. It is just that it is such a true and sad state of affairs. It talks a lot of corruption and inefficiences in the system. It talks about the ways people are discriminated against in the "world's largest democracy," but most of all it talks about giving people hope. It talks about what someone is willing to do to give people a credible, sustainable future. It is great to see someone who has worked hard and earned his money now putting that money to work to give hope to others. A truly moving story and well worth the read.
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10 of 10 people found the following review helpful By William C. Schroth on March 24, 2005
Format: Hardcover
With an understanding of globalization and public policy, the author dissects the problem of rural poverty in India and advances bold new ideas on how to improve the situation. Illustrated by his own extraordinary personal experience in south-central India, the author provides lessons which cross national boundaries for those who want to make a difference in the lives of the world's poorest citizens. The problem is deep-seated and the obstacles to improvement are many, but one finds hope in the book through the improvements one committed man has made in the lives of a small portion of India's rural poor.
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9 of 9 people found the following review helpful By Joseph Nampiaparampil on March 2, 2005
Format: Hardcover
Recently, Dr Abraham George, author of India Untouched was honored at a function in Chicago. Mr. P S Nair, introduced Dr George with words along these lines-

Five thousand years ago, India came up with the idea of vasudeivakudumbakam (the whole world is one family). For Dr. George, the whole world is one family- the global family.

While reading the book, one finds out how aptly the description Mr. Nair gave fits its author. It covers the experiences of a person trying to provide equal opportunities to people in the lowest ladder of society and

the mechanisms he has set up to accomplish the objective.

Dr George was in the forefront of the IT revolution which brought about the reality of global village.

It is in a way a strange coincidence that Dr George chose Dharmapuri near Bangalore for his model for global family. Multinational corporations in Bangalore, the Silicon Valley of the East, go after the best coming out of India's schools. George Foundation founded by Dr George also goes after the best but with a difference. The Foundation is after the most deprived children of Dharmapuri. These are kids who `had never used toilets, slept in beds, sat in a chair, worn footwear, eaten a square meal in a day, or played with toys". They are given access to the same technologies as the children of the rich and are getting a world class education.

Dr George has come with an innovative workable model in social sciences, which is transportable anywhere in the world where there is poverty and despair.

The book should be a required reading for global studies in high schools, social/political sciences in colleges and policy making bodies in national/international organizations.
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9 of 9 people found the following review helpful By Robert on March 22, 2005
Format: Hardcover
India Untouched shows what a determined individual can accomplish to alleviate the suffering of the poor. The author had his undergraduate education in India and was an artillery officer in Indian army. He comes to the States, gets a Ph.D. in Business from New York University and starts a company to help multinationals to manage their foreign currencies. He is successful in his business. Now he decides to sell his business and goes to India to do some thing for the poor. He selects for his operation one of the poorest areas in whole of India where caste and class have combined to make life of the poor unbearable. A residential school is started and four year olds from the poorest are selected. The author makes use of his business acumen to get a highly motivated staff to give these kids a high quality education.

Once you get involved with kids, you come face to face with the problems facing the rural folk. There is practically no good health care in the rural areas. The author successfully installs a computer based "Early Detection and Prevention System" in the primary Health Center run by the government which has now become a model for other centers to provide better health care at minimal cost.

The author then starts a banana plantation to give jobs to the poor women to raise their status in society. Each of the women working in the plantation will get half an acre if she puts part of her wages in a deposit scheme. With ownership of productive land the woman will have her place in society.

The author tells what has to be done to raise the standard of the poor and has shown that it can be done.
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