Enter your mobile number or email address below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone
  • Android

To get the free app, enter your email address or mobile phone number.

Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

His Indian Brother Hardcover – 1955

4.9 out of 5 stars 8 customer reviews

See all formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Price
New from Used from
Hardcover
"Please retry"
$27.50

Top 20 lists in Books
Top 20 lists in Books
View the top 20 best sellers of all time, the most reviewed books of all time and some of our editors' favorite picks. Learn more
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE


Product Details

  • Hardcover: 188 pages
  • Publisher: Abingdon Press; 1St Edition edition (1955)
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B0007EU2AM
  • Product Dimensions: 9 x 6 x 1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.4 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (8 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,709,858 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

5 star
88%
4 star
12%
3 star
0%
2 star
0%
1 star
0%
See all 8 customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Hardcover
I'm even older than this book, and read it -- dozens of times -- in my youth, so may have forgotten a bit, but as I recall, the author based it upon a true, but sketchy, account of a New England father and son who went in a canoe up a river into wild Maine to establish a home for their family. They built a cabin and started a garden, and the father went back to get the rest of the family. The family's return was delayed by illness. The son kept up the work around the cabin and was OK for a while, but was beginning to be in real trouble when he was found by another father and son -- of the much earlier Maine settlers. The Indian father needed to be elsewhere, so he left his very unwilling son to take care of the white boy, who was unable to travel. The bulk of the book is the story of how two very different adolescents, each initially feeling superior to the other, learn to respect one another, become friends and eventually, adopted brothers.

There is no horse in this book, but there are moose and muskrats, and a bough house built to provide a proper sleeping environment. An element I didn't consciously notice until I was grown is that the two fathers, though fairly minor characters, are both intelligent, thoughtful men, loyal to their own cultures, but capable of understanding that something different can also be good in its own way, which is probably why they had sons who, when thrown together with someone very different, could find, not an enemy, but a brother.

The author's efforts to take the bare essentials of the story in the true account and fill it in with a plausible set of "might have been" details produced a work likely to be enjoyable reading for boys and girls of any age.
Comment 2 of 2 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Textbook Binding
Excellent book for Elementary School age children. The book is probably best suited for boys who want to read about the adventures of a young boy who was separated from family and had to learn to survive in the Main wilderness assisted by Indians. Hope you enjoy reading this book.
Comment 2 of 2 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover
When I was in Elementary School this was my favorite book. I would check it out of the library and read it time after time. A great story about a boy taken in by the Indians in Maine and his adventures.
Comment 1 of 1 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover
I first read this book when I received it as a Christmas present in 1956 ...yes that long ago. I still have my copy. I loved the book then, and I love it now. I later became aware of the book, Sign of the Beaver, written by Elizabeth George Speare in 1983, decades after Hazel H. Wilson wrote and published His Indian Brother. It's the SAME story, only with different names for the characters. It's as if Speare paraphrased WIlson's book, but Speare won recognition for her book with a Newbery Honor Award in 1983. I could NEVER understand why. This is an excellent story for any age, timeless in its message.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse