Your Garage Best Books of the Month Amazon Fashion Learn more Discover it PME Fire TV Stick Subscribe & Save Patriotic Picks Shop-by-Room Amazon Cash Back Offer WienerDog WienerDog WienerDog  Amazon Echo  Echo Dot  Amazon Tap  Echo Dot  Amazon Tap  Amazon Echo Introducing new colors All-New Kindle Oasis Segway miniPro

Format: Paperback|Change
Price:$4.75+ Free shipping with Amazon Prime
Your rating(Clear)Rate this item


There was a problem filtering reviews right now. Please try again later.

on September 5, 2013
This book was important to me as a child who was interested in Native American culture, and I loved it and wore out my paper copy. It's an easy but informative read for any child, including boys as well as girls.

Aside from the accurate, detailed, interesting writing and drawings of Native American ways and artifacts, the book also focuses on the very real feelings of grief, loss, and abandonment, and finally the acceptance of a child who has lost her family and been forced to accept a new one. Children nowadays often lose family and friends through death, divorce, and sudden family moves, and being able to relate to Mollie's sadness and the firm but kind behavior of her new people could be therapeutic for a child in one of those situations.

Having re-read this book as an adult, I would recommend it to any child between the ages of about 8 or 9 and older, especially kids who have struggled with grief and loss.
0Comment|One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on November 16, 2006
As we travel back in time, to the middle 1700s', we find ourselfs face to face with Molly Jemison. A girl of the mere age of twelve, her family is taken captive and murdered, all except for Molly. A friendly indian tribe takes her in and treats her like their own. Molly, or "Corn Tassle", doesn't like it there and misses her family. She weeps and is punished for it, has to carry a burden strap, and live like an Indian. She makes only one friend, Little Turtle, for all the other children treat her differently. Corn Tassle must learn to live in this new world, because it's eat or get eaten! She hates everyone and want's to go. But there copper skined people teach her about the earth and it's creatures, so when she is given the chance to leave, will she take it? Find out when you read Indian Captive!
0Comment|7 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on April 8, 2008
I bought this book for my 11 year old daughter who enjoys biographies, especially about women and girls. I actually ended up reading the book before she did, and I was pleasantly surprised at how much *I* enjoyed it. It gives a realistic view of Mary's life after being kidnapped by indians, and her physical, mental, and emotional struggles over losing her family and having to adapt to a new way of life. It's a great book, and I recommend it for any pre-teen, but especially for young girls who enjoy reading true stories about girls close to their own ages.
0Comment|7 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on January 11, 2007
Indian Captive, writhen by Lois Lenski, is a based true story of young Mary Jemison, who was taken, in the year of 1758, by Seneca Indian. A band of warriors invaded her house and took her family captive. Mary is separated from her family. They went across mountains and valleys to get to Fort Duquesne. Mary was sold to two Indian women, and was taken to their village.

At the village, Mary got a new name of Corn tassel and was called Corn tassel because of her blond hair. She was miserable so she tried to runaway. She makes new friends and starts to enjoy living with Indian. She is offered a chance to go back with her family, but she can't leave her new family behind. Will she ever see her family again, or will she stay with the Indians? Read the book and find out.

We give this book *** [3] and a half stars, because interesting and exciting. We recommend this book to our friends.
0Comment|4 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on August 3, 2013
The only book I have ever read about children being kidnapped by the Indians. This is a touching story about 'Molly' Jemison. It's strange this is not in my history books at school. I like books that are going to keep you entertained the whole time you are reading it. And this book did! My favorite part of the book is when Molly gets a chance to go and live with the Englishman. She decides to stay with the Indians and she shows that she is a true Indian girl at heart. You must read this book now!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
0Comment|3 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on November 27, 2013
I am 11 years old, so consider this a kid's perspective.

I was told by my little sister that this was her favorite book, and if I read this book, I could tell her to read one too. (She read a whole nother story)

I admit, I didn't have high hopes for this book, and I was kinda disappointed she chose this one.. Now, I am so glad she did because it is one of my personal favorites. Amazing book, and I suggest this book to anyone... They can be five and like it, and don't be hesitant to read it if you are an adult or beyond that. Read this book, please, and you'll be glad you did.
0Comment|2 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on March 2, 2015
I discovered Lois Lenski's books about 65 years ago and read all that were available in my elementary school library. I especially remember Indian Captive and Strawberry Girl so I purchased these to pass among my 6 grand daughters. What fun we are having sharing our favorite books.
0Comment|One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on February 22, 2000
I didn't want to read this book, but it was school asignment so I had to. As soon as got got into it, I didn't want to put it down! It's not very thrilling, but you really feel with the character! You picture Molly out in the field of rippening corn with her yeller hair a shining in the sun. You cry with for her when she's taken from her family, and you rejoice when she learns to love the indians, because by that time you love them too! Great book! Not a boring moment!
0Comment|4 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on November 1, 2000
Possibly interesting reading for a young teenage or preteen girl. Otherwise, the writing is very simplistic, often redundant to make a 'teaching' point. Thrust of the book seems to be teaching Indian methods and building a positive image, not necessarily telling Mary Jemison's story. Perfectly politically correct reading, which means somewhat sterile, but safe for all ages... if they will bother to finish it.
0Comment|4 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on February 27, 2014
I wish to add a bit of clarity to the reviews of this book...
It is written for little girls (at heart) in a completely "fictional" storybook format.
Yes, it is based on a real person, but the events are not described as "first person" or factual, but rather as a narrative including the main character's thoughts & emotions although the author is not part of the story line or subject expert.
This book is not a biography or research documentary, it's a child's storybook...and a nice one at that.
Just know what you're getting. Enjoy.
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse

Send us feedback

How can we make Amazon Customer Reviews better for you?
Let us know here.